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Full text of "Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh"

11 JUL. 90 



TRANSACTIONS 



OF THE 



ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH 

VOL XXXV. PART IV.— (Nos. 20 to 23)— FOR SESSION 1889-90. 



CONTENTS. 






'J* 






«S 



Art. XX. On the Thermal Conductivity and Specific Heat of Manganese-Steel. By A. 

Crichton Mitchell, B.Sc, . . . . . .0 17 

XXI. Strophanthus hispidus: its Natural History, Chemistry, and Pharmacology. By 
Thomas R. Feasbb, M.D., F.R.S., F.R.S.E., F.R.C.P.E., Professor of Materia 
Medica in the University of Edinburgh. Fart I. Its Natural History and 
Chemistry. (Plates L-VIL), . . . . . .955 

XXII. On the Foundations of the Kinetic T/ieory of Gases. III. By Professor Tait, . 102!) 

Will. On Systems of Solutions of Homogeneous and Central Equations of the nth D<^ 

and of two or more Variables'; with a Discussion of tht Loci of such Equations. 

By the Hon. Lord M'Laben. (Plates I. -VI.), .... 1043 



APPENDIX 

The Council of the Soviet!/, .... 

Alphabetical Lid of the Ordinary Fellows, 

L ist of Honorary Fellows, .... 

List of Ordinary Fellows Elected during Session 1887-88, 
List of Ordinary Fellotvs Elected during Session 1888-89, 
Laws of the Society, ....... 

The Keith, Makdougall-Brisbane, Neill, and Victoria Jubilee Prizes, 

Awards of the Keith, Makdougall-Brisbane, Neill, and Victoria Jubilee Prizes 

Proceedings of Statutory General Meetings, .... 

List of Public Institutions and Individuals entitled to receive Copies of the Transactions and 
Proceedings, ..... 

Index, ...... 



1102 
1103 
1118 
1120 
1122 
1125 
1132 
1135 
1139 

1145 
1151 



\Tssued Mm i 12, 1800 A 



( 947 ) 



XX. — On the Thermal Conductivity and Specific Heat of Manganese-Steel. 
By A. Crichton Mitchell, B.Sc. 

(Read 1st April and 1st July 1889.) 

Introduction. 

Until a few years ago it was the general opinion among metallurgists that the 
presence of manganese in steel exceeding the proportion of 1 per cent, is prejudicial to 
the value of the steel, inasmuch as a higher percentage of manganese has the effect of 
lowering markedly its tensile strength and toughness. But in 1884, Messrs Hadfield 
& Company, of the Hecla Steel Works, Sheffield, exhibited, at a meeting of the Institute 
of Mechanical Engineers, a number of samples of steel containing upwards of 10 to 15 per 
cent, of manganese,"and submitted the results of experiments, which showed that the 
samples were, in point of tensile strength and hardness, in no way inferior to steel. Again, in 
1888, Mr R. A. Hadfield read to the Institute a paper on the subject, giving the details 
of a large number of tests, which brought to light some interesting mechanical pro- 
perties of alloys of manganese and iron. Since its introduction, these alloys (and 
particularly that containing 10 to 15 per cent, of manganese, known as " manganese-steel ") 
have been studied by several physicists, and further peculiarities have been found. It 
appeared desirable that the thermal conductivity of so peculiar a substance should be 
investigated. The present paper is an account of experiments made in the Physical 
Laboratory, Edinburgh University, with a view to the determination of its thermal con- 
ductivity. In the reduction of such experiments a knowledge of the specific heat is 
necessary, hence there is also given an account of experiments whereby the specific heat 
was determined. 

General Properties of Manganese-Steel. 

It will be well to give here a brief summary of the properties of this substance, so far 
as they have as yet been investigated. In the first place, the peculiar effects of the 
addition of varying percentages of manganese to steel must be noted. Mr Hadfield's 
experiments on this point may be shortly summarised as follows : — Ordinary steel 
contains from 0*6 per cent, to 0*8 per cent, of manganese, besides the usual pro- 
portions of carbon, silicon, phosphorus, &c. If the proportion of manganese be increased 
to 2 - 5 per cent, a marked falling off in tensile strength takes place, the material becoming 
at the same time somewhat brittle and "unsound"; if from 2'5 to 7'5 per cent, be 
present, the steel becomes exceedingly hard, the tensile strength is still lowered, and it 
becomes so brittle that small samples may be reduced to powder in a mortar ; as the 
proportion of manganese increases to 10 per cent, the brittleness disappears, and the 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV (NO. 20). 7 F 



948 MR A. CRICHTON MITCHELL ON THE 

material gains enormously in toughness and tensile strength, while the hardness which is 
so marked in the lower percentage is lessened. The same holds with higher proportions 
up to 25 per cent. Thus, taking into consideration as well the other properties to be 
immediately mentioned, we find that while iron and manganese alloys containing upwards 
of 7 "5 per cent, of the latter present features more akin to those of steel, others with 
higher proportions, exceeding 7 '5 per cent., have the entirely different characteristics of 
what is practically a new substance. As already mentioned, it is to that particular alio} 7 , 
containing from 10 to 15 per cent, of manganese, that the name " manganese- 
steel " has been given. 

The chemical composition of manganese-steel varies, but the following may be taken 
as an average : — 



Carbon, 

Silicon, 

Sulphur, 

Phosphorus, 

Manganese, 



- 85 per cent. 
0-23 
0-08 
0-09 
13-75 



Its density is 7 '8 3 ; practically the same as wrought iron. Its hardness is of a some- 
what peculiar nature. Thus, while to drill a hole in manganese-steel takes 15 or 20 times 
longer than in ordinary steel, and while it is hard enough to scratch any steel but the 
hardest-tempered, yet it may easily be indented by a blow from a hand-hammer. It is 
also strange that, being so difficult to drill, or to cut with a planing-tool, when subjected 
to a compression-load of 100 tons, cylinders of manganese-steel, 1 inch long, 0'75 inch 
diameter, were shortened 0'25 inch; while chilled iron cylinders of exactly the same 
dimensions, and under the same conditions, were scarcely altered. The tensile strength 
varies from 50 to 65 tons per square inch, according to the mode of treatment. Hard- 
drawn manganese-steel wire will, however, stand upwards of 110 tons per square inch. 
The tensile strength is greatly increased by the process known as "water-toughening"; 
i.e., raising the material to yellow heat, and immediately plunging it into cold water. 
The elongation under stress is much greater in this alloy than in steel of the ordinary 
kinds, being in some cases as much as four times. Steel with a tensile strength of 60 
tons per square inch seldom gives more than 10 per cent, elongation ; while a similar 
bar of manganese-steel will give 50 per cent, elongation. 

When manganese-steel is subjected to the usual process employed in tempering steel, 
it behaves in an unusual manner. " Water-toughening " makes it softer ; heating it, 
and allowing it to cool in air, hardens it ; sudden cooling also increases its ductility. 
These effects are the reverse of what takes place in ordinary steel. 

One of the most peculiar features about this alloy is that it is almost non-magnetic ; 
a fact first pointed out by Mr Bottomley * and Dr HoPKiNSON.t Since then, Professor 
EwnroJ has fully investigated its magnetic properties. He finds that its magnetic suscep- 

* B.A. Report, 1885, p. 903. t Phil. Trans., 1885, Part II. t B.A. Report, 1887, p. 587. 



THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND SPECIFIC HEAT OF MANGANESE-STEEL. 949 

tibility is about 8 ^ 00 of that of iron, i.e., only fractionally greater than that of copper, 
brass, or air ; further, that it is constant ; not undergoing any change corresponding to 
the " breakdown " in resistance to magnetisation which is found in the case of iron. 

From the experiments of various observers, it would seem that the electrical resistance 
of manganese-steel is about eight times that of iron, the temperature coefficient being one- 
third of that in iron. 

Thermal Conductivity of Manganese-Steel. 

Experimental Methods and Details. — The bars upon which were made the experi- 
ments for the determination of the conductivity were kindly furnished, in the rough cast 
state, by Messrs Hadfield. The work of bringing them into the required shape and 
dimensions was one of considerable difficulty. It was at first attempted to reduce them 
to the desired rectangular section by planing, but this was found to be simply impossible. 
To begin with, only thick shavings could be taken off at each stroke of the planing-tool, 
which, when it did get a good grip, seemed rather to tear than to cut the material. 
Again, the planing-tool s were soon all ruined, for, after a few minutes' work, their edges 
were all but completely turned off. Thus, even with the best tempering of the tools 
possible, the process of planing was found to be useless. In this extremity, Messrs 
Hadfield were asked to supply a piece of manganese -steel of harder quality than that 
of the bar, with which to make a planing-tool, but in reply they stated that although 
this had been frequently suggested, it had not proved successful. In these circumstances 
recourse was made to grinding the bar down by means of an emery-wheel revolving at 
high speed. This method does not, of course, ensure the same uniformity of section that 
planing would do ; but on testing very carefully the finished bar, it was found that 
the section was quite uniform enough for the purposes of the experiment. The dimen- 
sions of the long bar were 50^ inches by 1^ inch by 1^ inch. Eight holes were drilled in 
this bar for the thermometers, the first being 9 inches from one end, the others 12, 
15, 18, 24, 30, and 42 inches respectively from the same end. The holes were 1-g- inch 
in depth and ^ inch in diameter. The length of the short bar was 20 inches, its cross 
section being, of course, the same as that of the long bar. One hole of the same size as 
the above was drilled in the short bar, which was fitted with screw-eyes at the ends with 
which to support it on bearings while being heated. Both bars were finally nickel-plated. 

A sample of the turnings from the bar was analysed in Professor Crum Brown's 
laboratory ; the following is the mean of two determinations : — 

Iron, ....... 87"56 per cent. 

Manganese, ...... 9'89 „ 

Carbon, . . . . . 1'30 „ 

Silicon, 0-48 

The method of finding the conductivity was substantially that originally devised by 
Forbes, the only difference being that a shorter bar was used, with a cooling bath placed 



9f>0 MR A. CEICHTON MITCHELL ON THE 

either at its cooler end, or near its middle, on the cooler side of the fifth thermometer. 
This was suggested by Professor Tait in his paper on "Thermal and Electric Conductivity,"* 
and first carried out in my experiments " On the Thermal Conductivity of Iron, Copper, 
and German Silver, "t The advantages of this improvement were noticed in the latter 
paper. 

The thermometers employed in the experiments were, with one exception, the same, 
and were used in the same way as in Professor Tait's and my own previous work. The 
single exception was that of the thermometer in hole A (i.e., that nearest the source of 
heat). This instrument was broken at the beginning of the experiments, but was replaced 
by another of exactly similar make and dimensions, and whose error was carefully ascer- 
tained. 

Of the eight holes in the bar, only five were used, those being first five reckoned from 
that end of the bar towards which they are closer together. These holes were, for con- 
venience, named A, B, C. D, E. The first four were separated by intervals of three 
inches ; the fourth and fifth by one of six inches. The cooling bath, through which a 
stream of water was kept steadily passing, was placed close to hole E. 

In all other respects the experiments were conducted on exactly the same lines as 
formerly, so that nothing remains to be said so far as details of experiment are 
concerned. 

Deduction of Conductivity. — The manner in which the readings of the thermometers 
are reduced, and from them the curve of stationary temperature excess constructed, has 
already been fully described in my paper quoted above. It has also been pointed out 
that this curve furnishes, so far, a test of the extent to which the experiments made on 
different days agree among themselves. Judged in this way, the experiments were very 
successful ; the only discrepance being in connection with the readings of the thermometer 
next to the cooling bath. But that this should be so is not at all surprising. 

The curve of stationary temperature excess being obtained, the next step is to find 
the value of the tangents to it at different points corresponding to different sections of 
the bar. This is best done by finding an equation between v (temperature excess) and 
x (position along the bar, reckoned from some arbitrary origin), which will represent the 
curve, and by differentiation finding the value of the tangent of inclination which is simply 

that of -y-. In my previous paper, two formulas were given which have been used 
for this purpose. These were — 

log* = loga- j-^ (A) 

\ogv = log a + ~T^~ ex ■ .... (B), 

where v and x have the above meaning, and where a, b, c, and e are constants. But for 
the present case, while either would with tolerable accuracy represent any small portion 

* Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin., vol. xxviii. t Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin., vol. xxxiii. 



THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND SPECIFIC HEAT OF MANGANESE-STEEL. 951 



of the curve, neither was applicable throughout its whole length with that exactness 
which is necessary. Accordingly, the curve was treated in sections, each beginning with 
a point corresponding to one of the holes in the bar, and terminating in another corre- 
sponding to the next hole. Each part of the curve was, by addition to or subtraction 
from its ordinates, converted into a logarithmic. From a comparison of the observed 
and calculated values of v, it was found that the formula for these separate sections 
represented curves having a slightly greater curvature than the observational curve, and 
that the calculated numbers agreed better with the observed in the middle of each 

section. Hence the values of -=- were nearer the truth when found for the middle of each 

ax 

section, were too high for the higher values of x, and too low for the lower values. But 



dv 



were 



by making the sections separately treated overlap one another, three values of 

obtained ; one too high, another too low ; and a third, which always lay between these 
two, and was obviously near the true value. 

It must be noted that the data from which the constants in the empirical formula? 
were obtained were the ordinates of points merely on the curve — not those particular 
points given directly by experiment. But the fact that the observations agreed remark- 
ably with each other, and that by using different temperatures at the source of heat, a 
considerable number of points were given directly by experiment, and all lying well on 
the curve, justifies the use of such points for data. 

The experiments on the cooling of the short bar were carried out, and also reduced 
in the usual manner. Hence little remark on this point is necessary, save the observa- 
tion that the curve of rates of cooling at different excesses of temperature exhibited no 
inclination to fall away, or show any point of contrary flexure. This, of course, is due 
to the precaution of raising the short bar to a temperature considerably higher than 
what is actually required to observe the cooling at any particular temperature excess 
reached by any of the thermometers in the long bar. 



Final Results. — 



Rates of Cooling of Short Manganese-Steel Bar. 



Temperature 
Excess. 


Eate of Cooling. 


Temperature 
Excess. 


Rate of Cooling. 


5 


005 


110 


1-55 


10 


010 


120 


1-73 


20 


021 


130 


1-92 


30 


033 


140 


208 


40 


045 


150 


2-27 


50 


0-58 


160 


246 


60 


073 


170 


2-67 


70 


092 


180 


291 


80 


104 


190 


314 


90 


123 


200 


337 


100 


139 




1 



952 



MR A. CRICHTON MITCHELL ON THE 



The following table contains nearly all the substance of the further calculations, 
and sufficiently explains itself : — 



Thermometer. 


Distance in Feet 
along Bur. 


Temp. Excess 

■c, 


dv 

dx ' 


Area of Curve of 

Cooling to next 

Value of x. 


Area of Curve of 

Cooling to end 

of Bar. 


Area corrected for 

Change of Specific 

Heat. 


A 
B 
C 
D 
E 


00 

025 

05 

075 

1-25 


189-2 

1082 

617 

341 

115 


35-32 

20-29 

11-86 

711 


6-625 
3321 
1-636 
102 


12-603 
5-977 
2-656 
102 


14-653 
6-619 
2-841 
1065 



From these data, it follows that the thermometric conductivity of manganese-steel is 
represented by the following numbers : — 



(1) 


From uncorrected areas, 








0° 

•00221 


100° 
00254 


200° 

•00287 



(2) From corrected areas, 

•00233 



00285 



00337 



It now remains to correct the values of the tangents and the areas of the curve of cooling 
for the error involved due to variable heating of the thermometer stems. The method by 
which this error is estimated and applied is detailed by Professor Tait in his introduction 
to my former paper. Applying this correction, the above results become — 

(1) From areas not corrected for change in specific heat, 

0° 100° 200° 

00211 -00246 -00281 

(2) From areas corrected for change in specific heat, 

•00219 00272 -00325 

For the purposes of comparison with the corresponding results for iron* (Forbes' 
wrought iron bar, cooled midway), the conductivity of manganese-steel may be taken 
as above, the results being corrected for change in specific heat, and also for error due to 
unequal heating of thermometer stems. The figures are as follows : — 





0° 


100° 


200° 


Manganese-steel, . 


•00219 


•00272 


00325 


Iron, .... 


0119 


•01274 


01358 



Hence it appears that the presence of 10 per cent, of manganese in iron or steel 
lowers its conductivity at 100° to one-fifth, and that the rate of increase of conductivity 
with temperature is, in manganese-steel, little more than half the corresponding 
coefficient in iron. That such a proportion, comparatively small, of manganese should 
have such a distinct effect upon the conductivity of steel, is remarkable, and, while it 
is on a parallel with the other rather anomalous properties of this substance, it points 

* Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin., vol. xxxiii. p. 555. 



THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND SPECIFIC HEAT OF MANGANESE-STEEL. 953 

to the extreme desirability of a thorough examination of the thermal conductivity of 
alloys, especially of those whose properties differ in a marked way from those of their 
components. 

Specific Heat of Manganese- Steel. 

The method employed to determine the specific heat of manganese-steel was practi- 
cally that known as the "method of cooling"; one which is based on the fact that two 
bodies, whose surfaces are exactly similar in nature and extent, lose by radiation equal 
quantities of heat, when their excesses of temperature over that of surrounding bodies 
are equal. That their losses of heat, under such circumstances, due to the combined 
effects of radiation and convection, should be equal, it is necessary that the mode in 
which the two experiments are performed should be as nearly similar as possible; the 
same precautions as to air-currents, and other influences tending to alter convection 
effect, should be adopted to the same degree in both. This was scrupulously attended to 
in the experiments, of which the following details may be given. 

Two cubical masses, one of wrought iron, the other of manganese-steel, were obtained, 
the latter being a part of the same material as that out of which the bars for the con- 
duction experiments were made. They were made as exactly as possible of the same 
dimensions, the length of each edge being If inch. A circular hole, 1 inch in depth, 
^-| inch in diameter, was drilled in each ; the axis of the hole being perpendicular to, and 
in the centre of, one of the faces of the cube. The surfaces of both cubes were made 
the same by the deposition on them of soot from the smoky flame of a paraffin lamp. 
One of the cubes was raised to a convenient temperature, say 300° C, by the flame of a 
Bunsen burner, and then allowed to cool, its temperature being noted at intervals by a 
thermometer whose bulb was inserted into the hole, which was filled up with a few drops 
of mercury to ensure good thermal contact of the bulb with the sides of the hole. The 
other cube was meanwhile placed at a distance, and used, by its thermometric indications, 
as a means of ascertaining the temperature of surrounding bodies. The thermometer 
employed for these cooling experiments was that used in the cooling experiments on the 
short bar in the conduction investigations ; its error was well known by comparison with 
carefully- constructed Kew standards. 

By such means the rates of cooling of both cubes were deduced from the observations, 
throughout a considerable range of temperature excess. Then, if m, m be the masses 
of the iron, and manganese-steel cubes, respectively ; c, c, their specific heats ; r, r , their 
rates of cooling at the same given temperature excess, 

m r'c = mrc, 

since each of these quantities represents the amount of heat lost in unit time at the 

given temperature excess. Hence 

, mr 

c = — —, c . 
mr 

Thus, if the specific heat of iron be known throughout the range of temperature used, 



954 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND SPECIFIC HEAT OF MANGANESE-STEEL. 



the other data along with it give the specific heat of manganese-steel. The specific heat 
of iron may be taken as being 0"114 (1 + *0014 t), most experimenters agreeing with 
this result. 

The following table embodies the mean results of ten experiments on each of the 
cubes. Temperature excess is in degrees Centigrade ; rates of cooling in degrees 
per minute : — 





Rate of Cooling. 




Temperature 
Excess. 




Ratio of these 
Rates. 








Iron. 


Manganese-Steel. 




20 


102 


0-91 


1121 


40 


210 


1-88 


1-117 


60 


319 


2-87 


1111 


80 


441 


3-97 


1111 


100 


5-78 


517 


1118 


120 


7-22 


645 


1119 


140 


8-76 


7-83 


1118 


160 


1038 


9-27 


1119 


180 


1210 


10-86 


1114 


200 


1398 


12-50 


1118 


220 


15-96 


14-28 


1117 


240 


1817 


16-20 


1121 



The fourth column shows that the ratio of the rates of cooling of the two cubes is 
very nearly constant. The average value of these numbers may be taken for the 
purposes of calculation as being very near the truth. This average value is 1*117. 
Then the specific heat of manganese steel is — 



, m r 
c = , x- x c 
m r 



252-25 



x 1117 x 114 (1 + 0014 t) 



259-25 
- -124(1 + -0014 0- 

Thus the specific heat of manganese-steel is about 1*087 times that of iron, and its rate 
of rise with temperature is the same as that in iron. 



( 955 ) 



XXI. — Strophantus hispidus : its Natural History, Chemistry, and Pharmacology. 
By Thomas E. Fraser, M.D., F.R.S., F.R.S.E., F.R.C.P.E., Professor of Materia 
Medica in the University of Edinburgh. 



Part I. — Natural History and Chemistry. (Plates I. -VII.) 

(Read 4th February 1889.) 



CONTENTS. 



Histoeical Introduction, .... 

A. Natural History — 

1. Use in Africa as an Arrow-Poison, and 

Description of Arrows, 

2. Botanical Description — 

General Description, 

Description of Root, Stem, Leaves, 
Flowers, Follicles, and of Seeds and 
other contents of the Follicles, 

Dehiscence of Follicles and Dissemi- 
nation of Seeds, .... 



PAGE 

955 



960 



975 



977 



990 



FAGE 



'. Chemistry — 

1. Seeds — 

Composition ; Ether Extract ; Alcohol 
Extract, its Characters, Constituents, 
and Reactions ; Absence of an Alka- 
loid ; Presence of a Glucoside, . 993 

Strophanthin ; its Preparation, Charac- 
ters, Composition, and Reactions, . 1008 

Strophanthidin; Kombic Acid, . 1017 

2. Composition of other Parts of the Plant — 

Comose Appendages; Pericarp; Leaves; 

Bark; Root, 1018 

Explanation of Plates I.-VIL, . . . 1025 



Historical Introduction. 

The preliminary notices published by me in 1870 and 1872, on the action and 
chemistry of Strophanthus, indicated that it was likely to prove of value as a therapeutic 
agent; and so early as the year 1874, I had applied the substance in a few cases to the 
treatment of disease. Before sufficient data, however, had been obtained to justify any 
conclusions regarding its value as a therapeutic agent, the observations were interrupted 
by my leaving Edinburgh to occupy a public office in England, in connection with which 
it was impossible to conduct observations on the treatment of disease. In 1879, oppor- 
tunities were again afforded to resume the interrupted observations, and results con- 
firmatory of the anticipations which had been raised by the earlier physiological observa- 
tions were gradually collected. The publication of a few of these results at the Cardiff 
meeting of the British Medical Association in 1885* has led to Strophanthus gaining a 
wide recognition as an important therapeutic agent, and to the production of numerous 
papers dealing with its botany, chemistry, pharmacology and therapeutics, not only in 
this country, but also in the continent of Europe and in America. 

In this paper I propose to give, with greater detail than has been attempted in the 

* British Medical Journal, vol. ii., 1885, p. 904. 
VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 G 



950 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

previous communications, an account of the observations I have made on the general 
natural history, the chemistry, and the pharmacology (or physiological action) of Strophan- 
tus. Before doing so, it may be desirable to state what knowledge existed with regard 
to these departments of its study and consideration previously to the publication of my 
papers of 1870 and 1872; to reproduce some of the leading statements contained in these 
papers ; and to indicate the extent to which the knowledge regarding Strophanthus was 
increased during the period of fifteen years which elapsed between the publication of my 
paper of 1870 and of my subsequent paper read before the British Medical Association 
in 1885. 

Previously to the publication of my preliminary paper of 1870, the knowledge regard- 
ing Strophanthus consisted of several botanical descriptions of the plant ; of notices by 
travellers of its use by African tribes, who had discovered its poisonous action, and had 
employed it as an arrow-poison in the chase, and apparently also in warfare ; and of a few 
brief references to some points relating to its physiological action. 

Interest was first attracted to the physiological action of this substance by the intro- 
duction into Europe of a few specimens of fruits and seeds reputed to be the source of 
a remarkable arrow-poison used in several parts of Africa, and termed in some districts 
the Kombe and in others the Inee poison. The physiologists who first examined the 
properties of this poison seem to have been Sharpey, and Hilton Fagge and Stevenson 
of London, and Pelikan of St Petersburg. 

Sharpey's experiments were made in 1862-63, but they were not published, as before 
his investigation had been completed my preliminary notice of 1870, briefly descriptive 
of the general results I had then obtained, was communicated to this Society, and, much 
to my regret, led Sharpey to refrain from publishing his observations, as they entirely 
agreed with those contained in my paper. From the notes of his experiments, which he 
afterwards very kindly sent to me, it is apparent that Sharpey had determined that the 
action of Strophanthus was characteristically that of a cardiac poison. 

On the 18th of May 1865, Hilton Fagge and Stevenson stated, in a note appended 
to a paper communicated to the Royal Society of London, on the " Application of Physio- 
logical Tests for Certain Organic Poisons,"* that the Manganja arrow-poison, obtained 
during the Zambesi Expedition by Sir John (then Dr) Kirk, acts as a " cardiac poison." 
By this expression they imply an action on the frog's heart of the same kind as that 
produced by digitalin, Antiaris toxicaria, Helleborus viridis and niger, Scilla, and 
certain other poisons ; and, especially, that the heart is stopped with the ventricle " rigidly 
contracted and perfectly pale." 

In the same year, on the 5th of June, PELiKAN.t in a note communicated to the 
Academy of Sciences of Paris, pointed out that an extract obtained from the seeds which 
yield the In^e or Onage arrow-poison acts on the frog's heart in the same way as digitalis 

* Proceedings of the Royal Society, vol. xiv., 1865, p. 274. 

t " Sur un nouveau poison du cceur provenantde l'lnde ou Onage, et employe au Gabon (Afrique Occidentale) comme 
poison des Heches" (Comptes Bendus de VAcaddmie des Sciences, tome lx., 1865, p. 1209). 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 957 

and other similar cardiac poisons, but with greater activity. The heart's beats were quickly 
arrested, with the ventricle in systole and with the auricles distended. This effect is 
attributed by him to an action on the nerve structures of the heart. He also states that 
his experiments were confirmed by Vulpian. Pelikan obtained the seeds from the 
Colonial Exhibition held in Paris in 1865, to which they had been sent by M. Griffon 
du Bellay, a surgeon in the French Naval Service, who had obtained them in the Gaboon 
district of West Africa, where they are used by an elephant-hunting tribe (Pahouins) to 
poison their small bamboo arrows. 

In 1869, a few specimens of ripe follicles were presented to the Materia Medica 
Museum of the University of Edinburgh by the Rev. Horace Waller, who had been a 
member of the Oxford and Cambridge Universities Mission of 1861-64, superintended 
by the late Bishop Mackenzie, with whom had been associated, during the operations 
of the mission between the River Shire and Lake Shirwa, the famous traveller Living- 
stone and the enterprising botanist Kirk. The follicles were sent with the information 
that the seeds contained in them constituted the Kombe arrow-poison of South-Eastern 
Africa. Mr Waller informs me that, at his suggestion, they had been brought to this 
country by Mr E. D. Young, R.N., when he went to Africa in 1867, to clear up the 
story of Livingstone's murder. Sir Robert Christison placed these follicles at my 
disposal for examination, and as in the course of time the insufficient material which 
they afforded was supplemented by some additional follicles sent to me by Professor 
Sharpey and, afterwards, by Mr John Buchanan, I was enabled to determine the most 
important facts in the pharmacological action, as well as in the chemistry of the substance, 
some of which were communicated to this Society in February 1870, in the form of a 
preliminary notice, and published in the Proceedings of that year, # and also, with a few 
amplifications, in the Journal of Anatomy and Physiology of 1872-t While the investi- 
gation was in progress, Sir Douglas Maclagan received from Sir John Kirk a poisoned 
arrow, obtained from the same district of Africa as the follicles ; and with this arrow I 
was enabled to determine that the poison possesses the same action as the seeds contained 
in the follicles, and thus to confirm the discovery already made by Kirk of the source of 
the arrow-poison. J 

My experiments were made on cold-blooded animals and on birds and mammals ; and 
the administration was effected by subcutaneous injection, and by introduction into the 

* Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, vol. vii., 1869-70, pp. 99-103. 

t Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, vol. vii., 1872, pp. 140-1 55. 

J In a recently written letter (31st Oct. 1888) Sir John Kirk thus graphically describes the discovery he had made 
in 1861 of the plant from which the Kombe poison is obtained : — " The source of the poison, namely, Strophantus 
Kombe', was first identified by me. I had long sought for it, but the natives invariably gave me some false plant, until 
one day at Chibisa's village, on the river Shire, I saw the ' Kombe,' then new to me as an East African plant (I had 
known an allied, or perhaps identical, species at Sierra Leone (1858), where it is used as a poison). There climbing on 
a tall tree it was in pod, and I could get no one to go up and pick specimens. On mounting the tree myself to reach 
the Kombe pods, the natives, afraid that I might poison myself if I handled the plant roughly or got the juice in a cut 
or in my mouth, warned me to be careful, and admitted that this was the ' Kombe ' or poison plant. In this way the 
poison was identified, and I brought specimens home to Kew, where they were described." 



958 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

stomach and rectum. In the pharmacological portion of the preliminary papers above 
referred to it was shown that — 1. " Strophanthus acts primarily upon the heart, and 
produces, as a final result of this action, paralysis of that organ with permanence of the 
ventricular systole." Experiments were quoted to support the view that it " acts in a 
powerful and direct manner upon the cardiac muscular fibre, greatly prolonging, in the 
first place, the contraction of these fibres, and ultimately rendering it continuous, and 
only to be overcome when relaxation occurs as a natural consequence of post-mortem 
decomposition" (p. 148); and that in frogs this action on the heart is independent of 
any influence exerted through the cerebro-spinal nervous system, as it occurs after 
destruction of the brain and spinal cord, and after division or paralysis by atropine, of 
the vagi nerves. It is added that sufficient data had not been obtained to warrant the 
assertion that no action is exerted upon the intra-cardiac ganglia (p. 149). 2. "Pul- 
monary respiration continues in cold-blooded animals for several minutes after the heart 
is paralysed. 3. The striped muscles of the body are acted upon, twitches occur in 
them, their tonicity is exaggerated, and, finally, their functional activity is destroyed, 
the muscles being then hard, and, soon afterwards, acid in reaction. These changes are 
accomplished subsequently to the final effect on the heart. They are the result of direct 
contact of the substance with the muscles themselves, and are independent of the action 
on the heart, as well as of any changes that occur in the physiological condition of the 
cerebro-spinal nervous system. 4. The reflex function of the spinal cord is suspended 
soon after the heart is paralysed, but the motor conductivity of the spinal cord and of 
the nerve trunks continues after the striped muscles are paralysed. 5. The lymph 
hearts of the frog continue to contract for many minutes after the blood heart has been 
paralysed." 

The papers also contain a description of the botanical source and distribution of the 
arrow-poison and of some of the characters of the plant from which it is obtained, especially 
of its follicles and seeds, and of the more important of the chemical constituents of the 
seeds. It is also stated that the seeds contain a large quantity of an inert fixed oil and 
an active principle of crystalline form, for which, in accordance with the terminology at 
the time adopted in this country to distinguish neutral or glucosidal active principles 
from alkaloids, the name Strophanthin, characterising a glucoside, was proposed. This 
strophanthin was further stated to act in the same way as the extract from the seeds 
(p. 142). 

In the interval of fifteen years that elapsed between the publication of my preliminary 
papers and of the communication to the British Medical Association, in which the thera- 
peutic uses and value of Strophanthus were pointed out (1870-1885), only two papers 
were published on Strophanthus.* 

* In 1870, however, M. Legros, at meetings of the Societe de Biologie, on the 14th and 21st of May, exhibited 
frogs under the influence of the Inee poison derived from arrows used at the Gaboon, in order to show that 
the heart is arrested by it, with the ventricle in systole ; and at the latter meeting, M. Bert stated that he had 
observed similar effects in cats under the influence of the same poison (Comptes Rendus de la Socie'te' de Biologie, 1870, 
pp. 81 and 84). 






DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 959 

The first of these is an admirable essay by MM. Polaillon and Carville, published 
in the Archives de Physiologie of 1872.* It contains much interesting information 
regarding the Strophanthus used in the Gaboon as an arrow-poison, and known there, as 
well as in other districts of West Africa, as the Inee, or Onaye, or Onage poison; but 
the greater part of it is occupied with a full description of an experimental investigation 
on the pharmacology of the seeds of the Strophanthus plant. These authors especially 
examined the action on the heart, on striped and non-striped muscle, and on the cerebro- 
spinal nervous system. Their results altogether harmonise with those I had already 
published in the preliminary papers. The most important of them are summarised by 
MM. Polaillon" and Carville in the following statements : — It acts on the heart, and 
produces death by paralysing this organ (p. 550). The ventricles are never arrested in 
diastole ; they are always contracted in systole (p. 705). The action on the heart is not 
produced through the brain, medulla, nor spinal cord (p. 697), but by an effect on the 
muscular fibre of the heart (p. 704). Inee acts on the muscular fibre, striped and 
smooth, of which it rapidly destroys the contractility ; but it does not appear to act on 
the nervous system nor on the peripheral blood-vessels. It is essentially a muscle 
poison. It has no action, or only a secondary action, on the other organs (p. 695). 
MM. Polaillon and Carville also state that the Inee poison produces no effect on the 
sea medusa, a creature unprovided with a central contractile organ for the circulation 
(p. 707). 

The second paper which appeared between the years 1870 and 1885 was that of MM. 
Hardy and Gallois on the active principle of Strophanthus hispidus, published in 
1877.t The two chief statements contained in this paper are, that the seeds of Strophan- 
thus contain an active principle which is not a glucoside (" ne rentre point dans le groupe 
des glucosides "),| and that the comose appendages of the seeds contain a crystalline sub- 
stance for which the name " Ineine " is proposed. This " ineine " is stated to give the 
reactions of an alkaloid, but to be destitute of any action on the heart, and, apparently, 
of any physiological action whatever. 

In the process adopted by them for separating the active principle of the seeds, 
Hardy and Gallois unfortunately used alcohol acidulated with hydrochloric acid. By 
so doing, they necessarily failed to separate the true active principle, which, as I have 
shown, is a glucoside easily decomposed by acids, even at an ordinary temperature ; and 
they, therefore, obtained only a decomposition product of the glucosidal active principle 
— the body, in fact, since described by me as strophanthidin. 

In reference to the alkaloid, believed by them to exist in the comose appendages of 
the seeds, subsequent observers, working with much larger quantities of material than 
they were able to obtain, have not been successful in discovering its existence. In the 
chemical portion of this paper I shall have occasion to point out that, even when one pound 

* Tome iv. pp. 523 and 681. 

t Journal de Pharmacie et de Chemie, t. xxv., 1877, p. 177. 

X Loc. cit, p. 179. 



960 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

of the comose appendages is manipulated, no alkaloid could be detected in the products 
that were obtained. 

To summarise this historical sketch, in so far as it relates to the pharmacology and 
chemistry of Strophanthus, previously to the publication of my papers of 1870 and 1872, 
only two brief notices appeared on its pharmacological action, both of which dealt merely 
with the nature of the action on the heart ; while during the interval of fifteen years 
that elapsed between the publication of my first paper and the subsequent communication 
of 1885, one paper of much interest, though adding but little to the existing knowledge, 
was published on the pharmacological action, and also only one paper on the chemistry 
of Strophanthus, which, however, did not advance the knowledge of the chemistry of the 
subject. 

Following upon the publication of the paper of 1885, on the therapeutical applications 
of Strophanthus hispidus, the literature of the subject has, however, very rapidly 
increased, and it now embraces upwards of a hundred separate papers. 

Until 1885, also, Strophanthus, elsewhere than in Africa, was a mere curiosity, repre- 
sented in a few museums by specimens of its flowers, follicles, or seeds. Since that 
time it has become a not inconsiderable article of commerce, several tons of seeds having 
been exported from Africa by London merchants alone, in order to supply the require- 
ments of medical practice. 

A. NATURAL HISTORY. 

1. Use in Africa as an Arrow-Poison, and Description of Arrows. 

In nearly every narrative of exploration in uncivilised tropical regions accounts are 
given of poisonous substances, which in many instances are stated to possess remarkable 
properties. Usually these poisons are of vegetable origin, and nearly all of them may be 
included in the two great divisions of Ordeal and of Arrow poisons. Among the most 
interesting of the Ordeal poisons are the Physostigma venenosum, and the Akazga 
or Akaja, or M'boundou of West Tropical Africa ; the Sassy, or Muave, or Casca 
(ErythrophlcBum) of wide distribution over Africa ; and the Tanghinia venenifera of 
Madagascar : and of the Arrow poisons, the Antiaris toxicaria and Strychnos Tieute of 
Java; the Aconitum ferox of China and India ; and the famous Wourali or Curare poison 
of South America. 

As I have previously stated, it is also to the enterprise and discriminating observation 
of explorers and missionaries that we are indebted for the interest in the Kombe arrow- 
poison, which has led to the examination of its properties and to the appreciation of its 
value as a therapeutic agent ; and several of them have collected valuable as well as 
curious information regarding it. 

Dr Livingstone, describing the employment of poisoned arrows for killing buffaloes 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 961 

by the tribes inhabiting the banks of the Mukuru-Madse, a tributary of the Shire Eiver, 

states that " the animals are wary, from the dread they have of poisoned arrows 

The arrow making no noise, the herd is followed up until the poison takes effect, and 
the animal falls out. It is then patiently watched till it drops — a portion of meat round 
the wound is cut away, and all the rest eaten. Poisoned arrows are made in two pieces. 
An iron barb is fastened to one end of a small wand of wood, ten inches or a foot long, 
the other end of which, fined clown to a long point, is nicely fitted, though not otherwise 
secured, in the hollow of the reed which forms the arrow shaft. The wood immediately 
below the iron head is smeared with the poison. When the arrow is shot into an animal, 
the reed either falls to the ground at once, or is very soon brushed off by the bushes ; but 
the iron barb and poisoned part of the wood remain in the wound. If made in one piece, 
the arrow would often be torn out, head and all, by the long shaft catching in the under- 
wood, or striking against trees. The poison used here, and called Kombi, is obtained from 

a species of Strophanthus It is possible that the Kombi may turn out a valuable 

remedy There is no doubt that all kinds of wild animals die from the effects of 

poisoned arrows, except the elephant and hippopotamus. The amount of poison that 
this little weapon can convey into their systems being too small to kill those huge beasts, 
the hunters resort to the beam-trap instead."* One of the arrows referred to by Dr 
Livingstone is represented in Plate I. fig. B. 

According to Sir John Kirk, " one poisoned arrow is said to be sufficient to kill a 
buffalo, but half a day is required for the poison to act. Probably the mechanical state 
of the poison causes this ; for the poison composition is hard, and will require time to be 
absorbed into the system from the wound. The hippopotamus is killed by it, but the 
quantity needed seems to be about thrice that on an ordinary arrow. It is driven through 
the thick skin of the animal by being placed on the barbed head in the lower end of a 
beam of wood, which falls from a height as the beast passes underneath a trap. The 
poisoned head is driven well in by the big end of the beam, and is left to act, which it is 
said to do in about half a day." t 

The Rev. Horace Waller, who was a member of Bishop Mackenzie's Expedition, 
informs me that in May 1863 he was presented with some pods of the Kombe poison at 
Chibisa's village, on the Shire river, by a chief named Dakananioio.J This chief, at the 
same time, stated that the manner of preparing the poison was " to gather the pods when 
green, cut off the outside rind, then expose them to the sun till dry, when the seeds 
were taken out, pounded, mixed with red clay, and the mixture, which is a red paste, 
packed round the arrow." Mr Waller also states " that in time of war it is common 
for the people of a village to place a quantity of the thistle-down appendage about the 
entrances, to warn the enemy that the villagers have been busy smearing their arrows." 

I am indebted for much valuable information to Mr John Buchanan, at present 

* Narrative of an Expedition to the Zambesi and its Tributaries, 1858-1864, by David and Charles Livingstone, 
1865, pp. 465-467. 

t Unpublished letter to Dr Sharpey, dated 1st January 1864. 

% Mr Waller subsequently gave these pods to Sir John Kirk, who brought them to England in 1863. 



962 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

Acting-Consul in the Nyassa district, and formerly associated with the Blantyre Mission 
of the Church of Scotland. In a letter, dated 8th May 1885, he informs me that "the 
Strophanthus plant is widely known amongst the natives at Blantyre and the surrounding 
districts as the most powerful poison they have. It is called ' Kombe' by the Manganja 
and ' Likombe ' by the Wayao tribes. I hardly think it is to be found in large quantities. 
At the chiefs village a small quantity may generally be got, for a parcel is always kept 
in the chiefs verandah in case of emergency, along with a number of poisoned arrows, 
ready to be used against an enemy. Formerly, game was often killed by arrows poisoned 
with Strophanthus. The flesh round the wound was cut out and thrown away, and the 

remainder eaten, but the precaution was always taken to boil the meat In 

preserving the Strophanthus, the follicles are taken from the plant before they are 
quite ripe, and the outer covering is scraped off. A number of follicles are tied together 
with palm leaves, so that they may not open when put out to dry in the sun. So far as 
I am aware, only the seeds are used." 

In a letter, dated 28th June 1881, Mr Buchanan thus describes the method followed 
in preparing the poison for arrows : — " A man breaks a follicle, and puts the seeds with 
wool attached into a pot. He then takes a small piece of bamboo, which has two thin 
splints inserted crosswise in the end, and he revolves this speedily by rubbing it between 
his hands. The seeds are thus put into motion and fall to the bottom of the pot, and the 
wool rises and comes out at the top, and is carried away by the least breath of wind. 
The seeds are then put into a small mortar and pounded into a paste, which is then ready 
for use. It is common to mix the milky juice of a Euphorbia with it to make it stick 
on the arrow. * .... Poisoned arrows are used in their wars with deadly effect." 

During his residence in the Gaboon district of West Africa, Dr Vincent found that 
the Pahouins or Fans, a warlike tribe inhabiting the banks of the rivers falling into the 
estuary of the Gaboon, employ a kind of cross-bow with which they shoot small bamboo 
arrows that are smeared at one end with a poison called "Inee" or " Onaye." This 
poison was subsequently discovered to be derived from the fruit of a Strophanthus.t 

M. Ehrmann, a merchant of Tchimbie, in the Gaboon country, states that while 
the Pahouins or Fans, inhabitants of the interior, term the arrow poison " Inee," 
the Gabonais, inhabitants of the coast, term it " Onaie." The poison is prepared by 
drying the pod, removing and pounding the seeds, and forming a paste with water. This 
paste is used to smear arrows, and also small pieces of iron which are discharged from 
firearms. M. Ehrmann further states that the inhabitants of the West Coast have 
largely replaced their bows and arrows by firearms, and that therefore the arrow-poison 
is now chiefly used by the inhabitants of the interior.J 

* In a letter to Messrs Burroughs and Wellcome of London, of later date than the above, Mr Buchanan states that 
the paste for the arrows is made by mixing the pounded seeds with water, and, to confer adhesiveness, with the juice 
from the bark of a species of Liliacese. He also states that before the flesh of an animal killed with poisoned arrows is 
eaten, the sap from the bark of the Baobab tree is put into the wound made by the arrow, as it is believed to neutralise 
any poison that may remain in the wound. 

t Archives de Physiologie normale et pathologique, tome iv., 1871-72, p. 524. 

X Bulletin Qe'ne'ral de TMrapeutique, tome cxiii., 1887, p. 529. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 963 

References to the use of poisoned arrows in Africa occur in the writings of many other 
travellers and explorers, but in most instances the effects of the poison, and the source 
from which it is derived, are not described with sufficient definiteness to render it 
possible to identify the poison.* 

Only a few poisoned arrows have as yet reached this country from Africa, owing, 
probably, to some extent to the difficulties of carriage, but certainly much more to the 
reluctance of the natives to place poisoned arrows in the possession of Europeans. I 
have, however, been able to examine arrows of eight different forms obtained from 
various parts of Africa. Two of them were given to me as specimens of arrows the 
poison of which was known to be the Kombe poison, or Strophanthus. Of the others, 
either no knowledge of the poison existed, or it was believed to be derived from plants 
other than Strophanthus. A few details regarding these arrows may prove of interest. 

Arrow A (see Plate I.). — Arrow in the Materia Medica Museum of the University of 
Edinburgh. One of four tied together, and labelled " Poisoned arrows from the interior 
of Africa, poison unknown." The label has unmistakably been written by Sir Robert 
Christison, but there is no further information to be found in the Catalogue of the 
Museum. This arrow has a total length of 38 inches. It has a shaft made of bamboo cane 
34 inches in length, with a deep notch for the bowstring, and with eight narrow feathers 
commencing 1^ inch above the notch, and extending If inch along the shaft. The 
arrow-head is a formidable-looking weapon made of iron, which is inserted into a hollow 
in the cane and secured by a cord, apparently consisting of animal tendon, tied round 2f 
inches of the cane. The portion of the head not inserted in the cane is almost 4 inches in 

* Burton (The Lake Regions of Central Africa, 1860, vol. ii. p. 305), for example, states that the Wanyika of 
Mombasah, the Wazaramo, the Wak'hutu, the Western Wasagara and the people of Uruwwa use poisoned arrows in 
warfare, and that the poison is extracted by the Wazaramo and the Wak'hutu from a plant called Mkande-Kande. They 
sold the poison at an exorbitant price, " but avoided pointing out to the Expedition the plant, which from their descrip- 
tion appears to be a variety of Euphorbia." Schweinfurth (The Heart of Africa, translated by Ellen E. Trewer, 
1878, vol. i. p. 140) asserts that the Bongo tribe of Central Africa poison their arrows with the milky juice of one of the 
Euphorbiae (venifica). Thomson (To the Central African Lakes and Back, 1881, vol. ii. pp. 40, 139) describes encounters 
in which he was threatened with poisoned arrows at Kwakissa, and by a Maranga chief. Cameron (Across Africa, 
1885, pp. 59, 242, 291) refers to the employment at Ugambo and Mombassa of poisoned arrows, neatly covered with 
banana leaves, for killing elephants ; to the natives at Neketo, on the Kaga, possessing arrows deeply barbed and 
poisoned ; and to the inhabitants of Ulegga using poisoned arrows for which they had an antidote. Montagu Kerr 
(The Far Interior, 1886, vol. i. p. 29) states that the Masarwa bushmen carry small bows and bark pouches containing 
poisoned arrows, the points of which are made of bone or iron, and the poison is the concentrated milky juice of 
Euphorbia arborescens. And Farini (Through the Kalahari Desert, 1886, pp. 332, 253) gives a description of the pre- 
paration of the poison for arrows from the milky juice of a large bulb mixed with serpents' venom, and states that 
poisoned arrows are used by the M'kabba, a pigmy tribe, and by the Orange River bushmen. 

Further, I am indebted to Dr Felkin for several small arrows, designated " Tikki-Tikki or Akka arrows," obtained 
by him at Rohl Bahr-el-Ghazal, a province of Central Africa, north of the Equator. They are from 18^ to 20 inches 
in length, and are furnished with iron heads, of which the straight portion is hollow, and fits on to the end of the 
wooden shaft, and the true head is oval or obovate, and in some of the arrows provided with wire-like spikes at the 
base. The poison is applied by dipping the whole head, including the straight part, into a dark brown gummy fluid, 
stated to be derived from a Euphorbia, which seems to be afterwards removed from the outside of the iron head, as it is 
found only on the inside of its hollow straight portion, and on the wood of the shaft covered by it. The thin wooden 
shaft has no feathering, but its extremity is cut into a circular disc of greater diameter than the rest of the shaft, showing 
apparently that the arrows are projected from a blow-tube. They are reputed to be very active, and are said to be used 
in warfare as well as for killing game. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 H 



964 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

length ; its straight portion is furnished with two curved and strong spikes pointing 
downwards and having sharp points ; and the true arrow-head is 2^ inches long, 
elegantly shaped, with a fine tapering extremity and sharp barbs, and with one lateral 
half of each surface concave and the other convex. The poison covers, in a layer of from 
|th to T Vth of an inch in thickness, the whole of the exposed straight portion of the 
barb and the two spikes projecting from it, and also the true arrow-head with the 
exception of its point and edges. This poison is of a dark greyish-brown colour, and 
is earthy, though rather tough, in consistence. Only a small portion of it is soluble in 
water, the solution being faintly acid, bitter, and of a light sherry colour ; the remaining 
undissolved portion appearing under the microscope as a granular debris in which frag- 
ments of vegetable tissue, numerous pieces of vegetable hairs, and oil globules could be 
distinguished. 

When examined chemically, the poison produced with solution of potash a faintly 
yellow fluid, in which pinkish or brownish particles were suspended ; and when heated 
between 116° and 120° F. along with 10 per cent, sulphuric acid, it gradually acquired 
a greenish colour, which passed into light brown. 

When O'l grain was thoroughly mixed with four or five drops of distilled water, a clear 
almost colourless solution was obtained, having a slightly bitter taste. This solution was 
injected under the skin of a frog weighing 420 grains, and it produced the disorders of 
motility, fibrillary twitches of muscles, and paralysis of respiration, which are observed 
under the action of Strophanthus. The heart was exposed one hour and forty-five 
minutes after the poison had been injected, and it was found to be in complete standstill, 
with the ventricle small and mottled, and the auricles dark and somewhat distended; 
and mechanical irritation applied to the ventricle and auricles failed to excite movement 
of any part of the heart. For some time after complete paralysis of the heart, active 
general reflex movements could be excited by slight irritation. 

Arrow B (see Plate I.) is one of the four tied along with arrow A, and its form is the 
same as that of other two of these four arrows, and altogether different, as the illustration 
shows, from the fourth arrow, or arrow A. Arrow B also closely resembles the arrow already 
referred to (pp. 957 and 961) as having been obtained in Bishop Mackenzie's Expedition, 
and described by Livingstone.* This circumstance probably indicates that the arrows A 
and B had also been obtained from the neighbourhood of the River Shire or of Lake Shirwa. 

Arrow B is 37 inches in length. The cane portion of the shaft has no feathers, but 
they seem to have been removed along with several inches of the extremity of the shaft. 
The head is of iron, and consists of a long nearly straight portion inserted into a hollow 

* An illustration has not been given of this arrow, as it is the same in every important detail as arrow JB. The 
physical characters of the poison are also the same, and it also consists structurally of fragments of vegetable tissue, 
amorphous yellowish-brown granular matter, oil globules, and incomplete vegetable hairs. The solution obtained by 
macerating and triturating one-tenth of a grain with water, somewhat quickly produced, in a frog weighing 329 grains, 
muscular weakness, gaping movements of the mouth, fibrillary twitches, and stoppage of pulmonary respiration. Thirty- 
six minutes after the solution had been injected, the exposed heart was found to be motionless, with the ventricle con- 
tracted, and the auricles large and dark, and no movement of the heart could be excited by mechanical irritation, 
although general, but feeble, reflex movements still followed irritation of the skin. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 965 

in the cane, where it is secured by a cord made of tendon wound round the end of the 
cane, and of a relatively small barbed head. The poison has been abundantly applied to 
the straight portion of the iron head, as it surrounds it for a length of nearly 5^ inches 
in a layer of about x^th of an inch thick ; and it has the same appearance as in arrow A. 
The barbed head is rather more than 1^ inch in length ; it has not the elegant tapering 
form of the barbed head of arrow A, but like it, one of the two wings on each surface is 
concave and the other convex. 

The poison is dark brownish-red on the outside, and paler, with a faint pinkish hue, in 
the interior ; and it is rather tough in consistence, and earthy in structure. It also is 
only partly dissolved by water, forming a nearly colourless acid solution; and the un- 
dissolved portion was found, under the microscope, to consist of fragments of vegetable 
tissue, numerous pieces of broken hairs, granular particles, and oil globules. When mixed 
with solution of potash, the fluid part became faintly yellow, having reddish particles 
suspended in it, and when heated gently with 10 per cent, sulphuric acid, it slowly 
became green, and afterwards dark brown. One-tenth of a grain rubbed with a few drops 
of water yielded a nearly colourless clear solution, wdiich produced, in a frog weighing 
310 grains, the same symptoms as the poison from arrow A. One hour after administra- 
tion, the exposed heart was found to be motionless, even when irritated ; and the ventricle 
was small and mottled in colour, and the auricles were dark and distended. Active 
general reflex movements were obtained fifteen minutes after the heart had been exposed. 

Arrow C (see Plate I.). — This arrow is one of two of exactly the same form, kindly 
given to me by Dr Felkin, along with other two arrows having the form represented in 
Plate I. fig. D. 

Arrow C was brought from a district 75 miles N.N.W. of Zanzibar, by Dr Felkin, 
and it is reputed to be poisoned with the same substance as arrow D, namely, the poison 
contained in the packet J, afterwards to be described. 

The total length of the arrow is 31 inches, and of this length about 29^ consists of 
the shaft. The latter is in two unequal pieces spliced together ; one piece, carrying the 
feathering, being about 20^ inches long, and the other, having the head attached to it, being 
about 9^ inches long. Both pieces of the shaft seem to be made of the same wood, which 
is about f ths of an inch in diameter, light, nearly white in colour, and smooth on the 
surface. The shaft has three narrow parallel feathers If inch long, lashed on to the 
shaft 1^ inch from the bowstring notch. The head of the arrow is made of iron, and 
its straight portion is inserted for |th of an inch into a split made in the wooden shaft, 
where it is secured by the shaft being lashed for \ an inch with cord. About ^ inch only 
of the straight portion of the head is exposed. The barbed portion is about l\ inch in 
length, unsym metrical, and somewhat rudely finished, and both wings of it are flat. The 
whole of the barbed head and of the short exposed portion of the straight piece of iron is 
irregularly covered with a thin dark brown incrustation, stated to be the poison, which 
adheres tenaciously to the head. 

On scraping the head with a knife, it was only with difficulty that a small quantity of 



966 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

a hard gritty powder, of dark colour, could be removed, which appeared under the micro- 
scope to consist merely of irregular structureless particles. When the powder was macerated 
and then triturated with water, a yellowish-brown nearly tasteless solution was obtained, 
but the greater part of the powder remained undissolved. The solution thus prepared 
from one-tenth of a grain, along with as much as possible of the undissolved substance, 
was injected under the skin of a small frog, but it failed to produce any obvious effect. 
The experiment was repeated with one-fifth of a grain of the scraped substance, and the 
result was also entirely negative. 

Dr Felkin was good enough to place at my disposal other three of the same arrows. 
On steeping the three heads in distilled water for twenty-four hours, a nearly clear pale 
yellowish-brown solution was obtained, which, on being evaporated to dryness at 100° R, 
left a pale reddish-brown residue, weighing only 0*15 grain. This residue was dissolved 
in 4 minims of distilled water, and injected under the skin of a frog weighing 326 grains ; 
but, as in the previous experiments, no symptoms were produced. 

If these arrows, therefore, had originally been poisoned with the same substance as 
arrow D, which is undoubtedly active, the poison had by some means been removed from 
them. 

Arroiv D (see Plate I.). — This arrow is one of two exactly alike, also very kindly 
given to me by Dr Felkin, and brought by him from the Wanyika country near 
Mombasa, on the east coast of Africa, north of Zanzibar. The arrow is 29 inches in 
length. The shaft is made of a nearly white, fined-grained, light wood : it is smooth and 
round, 23^ inches in length and -^-ths of an inch in diameter ; and is provided with 
three rather broad feathers, each nearly 2 inches long and \ an inch wide, which are 
neatly lashed to the wooden shaft, immediately above the bowstring notch. The head 
is made of iron, and consists of a straight portion, merely inserted, without any lashing, 
for 1 inch into a hollow in the wooden shaft, and of a small barbed head, unsymmetrical, 
and unprovided with any grooving on the wings. The poison is smeared round the straight 
portion of the head, which is 4 inches long and x\ths of an inch thick, and it is pro- 
tected by a covering of skin (like kid) carefully coiled round the whole of the head. The 
poison is of a greyish-black colour on the surface, and black and resin-like in the interior.* 
When a little water is added to it, a reddish-brown clear solution is soon produced, which 
in a few hours becomes very dark in colour and opalescent. The solution has a faintly acid 
reaction, but no distinct bitterness. On microscopic examination, the poison was found 
to consist of an abundance of vegetable cells and fibres, numerous oil globules, some 
amorphous yellowish granular matter, and a few fragments of vegetable hairs. With 
solution of potash it almost entirely dissolved, and became of a dull orange colour, and 
with 10 per cent, sulphuric acid it became light brown, and then, on being heated be- 
tween 116° and 118° F., reddish-brown — the latter colour continuing for twenty-four hours. 

* An arrow almost identical with this one was shown to me by the Rev. Ed. H. Baxter, of Mpwapwa, who had 
obtained it from the Wakamba, a tribe of elephant hunters inhabiting a district adjoining that of the Wanyika tribe 
The arrow is stated to be used in warfare also. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 967 

When the watery solution obtained by triturating one-tenth of a grain with 4 minims 
of distilled water was injected under the skin of a frog weighing about 400 grains, 
symptoms appeared similar to those observed with toxic but non-lethal doses of Stro- 
phanthus, and the frog afterwards recovered. When, however, the watery solution from 
one-fifth of a grain was injected under the skin of a frog, weighing 320 grains, the 
peculiar attitude, the gaping movements of the mouth, the fibrillary twitches of muscles, 
the slowing of respiration, and the general feebleness of voluntary muscles observed in 
Strophanthus poisoning manifested themselves ; and on exposing the heart, forty -two 
minutes after the administration, it was found to be motionless and inexcitable by 
mechanical irritation, and to present the usual appearance of a heart poisoned by 
Strophanthus. General reflex movements could be produced for many minutes 
after the heart had ceased to contract, and they were, indeed, particularly sudden 
and shock-like in character, even when the animal was flaccid and incapable of 
performing any voluntary movements ; but no reflex contractions could be excited by 
succussion. 

Packets or Bags of Wanyika Arrow-Poison, J (see Plate II.). — The poison for 
arrow D, and it is stated also for arrow C, is stored ready for use in cylindrical packets 
or bags, constructed of three layers of palm leaf. I am further indebted to Dr Felkin 
for two specimens of unbroken packets, and also for a separate irregular-shaped, dark, 
resin-like piece of a substance reputed to be the same poison. One of the packets is 
represented in fig. J of Plate II. It weighs 834 grains, and the other packet 732 grains. 
Each packet is neatly tied round and secured at the ends with a cord, which, at one of 
the ends, is continued into a loop for suspending the packet. 

The poison is of a dark brown, nearly black colour, and is hard but yet slightly plastic. 
A small portion put into a few drops of water sank to the bottom, and at once began to 
dissolve, the solution being at first clear and pale brown in colour, but afterwards dark 
brown and opalescent, from suspended minute brown particles. The solution was 
slightly acid in reaction, but in small quantity it was not distinctly bitter. When the 
opalescent fluid was examined microscopically, it was found to consist chiefly of minute 
yellowish-brown granules, and of small masses composed of these granules, mingled with 
which were a very few fragments of vegetable tissue and apparently of vegetable hairs. 
It almost entirely dissolved in solution of potash, forming a deep gamboge-yellow solu- 
tion, which very soon became brownish-yellow; and when heated with 10 per cent, 
sulphuric acid at a temperature of 110° to 120° F., it became at first light brown, then 
darker brown, and afterwards brown with a faint violet hue. 

One-tenth of a grain mixed with 3 minims of distilled water was injected under the 
skin at the left flank of a frog weighing 440 grains. The frog soon moved about 
uneasily, some froth was produced in the glass chamber in which it was confined, the 
respirations became infrequent and then ceased, the pupils contracted, fibrillary twitches 
occurred at the flanks and back and subsequently in the posterior extremities, and the 
movements became greatly impaired. When the frog was lying flaccid and resting on 



968 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

the chest, it was placed, one hour and nine minutes after the administration, on the back, 
and it remained in this position after a few feeble struggles ; and while in this position, 
careful inspection failed to reveal any cardiac movement. One hour and thirty-two 
minutes after the administration, the heart was exposed and found to be motionless 
and inexcitable, with the ventricle small and pale on the anterior surface and dark on 
the posterior surface, and with the auricles large and dark. At this time the pupils were 
small, and the skin much paler than before the experiment. Irritation of the skin over 
the nates caused reflex movements for ten minutes subsequently, when the observations 
were discontinued. 

Half-a-grain of the same poison, dissolved and suspended in four minims of water, 
was injected under the skin of a frog weighing 438 grains. Similar symptoms to those 
last described made their appearance, with the addition of prolonged gaping movements 
of the mouth. In fifteen minutes, the frog remained on the back, and no cardiac move- 
ment could be detected. The exposure of the heart was purposely delayed in order to 
see if any symptoms of a spasmodic description, or any evidence of reflex exaggeration 
would appear, but they were not detected. The heart was exposed one hour and twenty- 
five minutes after the injection of the poison, and it was found to be motionless and 
inexcitable, with the ventricle small and mottled, and the auricles large and dark ; but 
spinal reflex movements could still be obtained on irritation. A few minutes afterwards, 
it was found that a section of the ventricle and also a section of the vastus externus 
muscle was acid in reaction. 

Rather less than two minims of the dark venous blood that had escaped when the 
heart was incised in the preceding experiment were injected under the skin at the left 
flank of a small frog weighing 320 grains. Decided symptoms were manifested in an 
hour and a half, and they were of the same kind as those described in the preceding ex- 
periment. In an hour and forty-five minutes, the respirations had ceased, the frog remained 
on the back, and careful examination failed to reveal any cardiac impact. The heart, 
however, was not exposed until the following morning, when the ventricle was found to 
be pale and contracted, and the auricles dark and distended. Strong general muscular 
rigidity was also then present. 

As the physical and chemical characters of this poison, and also in some respects of 
the poison of arrow D, reputed to be the same substance, were somewhat different from 
those of the poison of most of the other arrows, it was considered advisable to perform 
another experiment, in order to determine if the Sassy or Muave (Eiythrophlceum) poison 
might not be present. The latter poison is of wide distribution; and as it is extensively 
used as an ordeal, its toxic properties are well known to many tribes in Equatorial Africa. 
It also is a cardiac poison, but in addition it produces spasms by acting on the medulla- 
centre. As the latter action might be masked by cardiac and muscle actions simul- 
taneously developed, an experiment was made in which, in a frog weighing 435 grains, the 
blood-vessels of one posterior extremity were carefully ligatured before the watery solu- 
tion obtained by triturating one-tenth of a grain of the poison J with 4 minims of dis- 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 969 

tilled water, was injected under the skin at the left flank. Symptoms of the same kind 
as those manifested in the previous experiment with one-tenth of a grain of the same 
poison, gradually made their appearance ; but at no time was any spasm or any exaggera- 
tion of reflex excitability shown, even in the tied leg. The heart ceased to contract in 
less than one hour after the poison had been administered, and the observations were 
continued until all reflex excitability had disappeared, as a consequence of stoppage of 
the circulation. 

The irregular-shaped piece of dark resin-like substance reputed to be the same poison 
as that contained in the packets was found to be inert when given in doses of one-tenth, 
one-fifth, and one-half of a grain, respectively, to small frogs. 

Arrow E (see Plate I.), like arrow A, is in the Materia Medica Museum of the 
University of Edinburgh. It is one of five similar arrows, tied together, and labelled 
"Arrows from Negroes of River Gambir, poison unknown," and also on a separate label 
in Sir Robert Christison's writing, "Poisoned Arrows used by the W. Africans near 
Macquania Island on the Gambir River. From Dr Neligan, 1856." 

The arrow is 32§- inches in length, but was originally of greater length, as all the 
five arrows have been shortened by being cut across near the bowstring end, there being 
neither notch nor feathering. The shaft is made of a rather slender bamboo cane, and in 
its present state it is 28^ inches long. The head is inserted into a hollow in this cane, 
and the part of the cane receiving the head is strengthened by a lashing of tendon for 
about l£ inch. The straight portion of the head projecting from the cane is 2^ inches in 
length ; and the barbed head is nearly 2^ inches long, and -f of an inch wide at its broadest 
part. The latter is of an elegant saggitate form, tapering gradually to a long fine point 
at the distal extremity, and terminating at the base in two narrow and long barbs ; and 
on each surface one of its lateral wings is convex, while the other is concave. The poison 
surrounds the straight portion of the head, and also extends up the centre of the barbed 
head almost to its point on each side. It is of a dirty greyish-brown colour externally 
and nearly black internally, brittle, without odour, and very bitter. When microscopically 
examined it was found to consist of fragments of vegetable tissue, yellow granular particles, 
numerous oil globules, and numerous broken pieces of vegetable hairs. 

With solution of potash, the fluid part became faintly yellow, with brownish particles 
diffused through it ; and when heated between 116° and 118° with 10 per cent, sulphuric 
acid, the original brown colour was slowly converted to green, and then became reddish - 
brown. When the poison was rubbed up with a little water, a sherry-coloured, clear, and 
faintly acid solution was obtained, but the greater part of it remained undissolved as a 
reddish-brown debris. 

The watery solution from xoth of a grain was injected under the skin of a frog weighing 
435 grains, and produced symptoms exactly resembling those following the administra- 
tion of Strophanthus. The heart was exposed one hour and forty minutes after the 
poison had been injected, and it was then perfectly motionless and inexcitable to 
mechanical irritation, the ventricle being small and mottled, and the auricles large 



970 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPID US. 

and dark. Fifteen minutes afterwards, fibrillary twitches were still occurring in the 
muscles, and active reflex contractions could be obtained by irritating any portion of 
the skin. 

Arrow F(see Plate II.). — In 1882, Mr Buchanan forwarded from the Shire" district of 
East Central Africa six poisoned arrow-heads, the poison of which was stated to be derived 
from a Strophanthus. Unfortunately, the arrows had been packed in a box along with 
botanical specimens preserved in brine and spirit, and as the jars containing some of the 
latter had been broken, the arrow-heads were much damaged on their arrival in this 
country. All the arrow-heads excepting one had the same form as the arrow B. The 
one of exceptional form is figured in Plate II. fig. F. The portion of the shaft that remains 
is made of bamboo cane, and the portion of it receiving the arrow-head is gradually thinned 
to the diameter of the straight portion of the head. This head is a very formidable- 
looking weapon, on account of the six spikes with points curving downwards, arranged 
in three tiers of opposite pairs, with which it is armed. It is altogether A\ inches long, 
the straight spiked portion occupying 2§ inches, and the true head If inch of this length. 
The latter is only \ an inch wide at its broadest part ; it is lance-shaped, and has two 
surfaces, each half of which is slightly concave ; and it is not provided with barbs, no 
doubt because they would be an unnecessary addition to the formidable spikes on the 
straight portion of the head. The composition or paste which originally contained 
the poison entirely covers the straight portion of the head and the spikes, and it is also 
smeared over the lance-shaped head, the encrusting layer having a length of 3 inches. It 
is now of a dull dark-brown colour, somewhat earthy in structure, easily breaking down 
to powder, and destitute of bitterness. With solution of potash a doubtful faint yellow 
was observed in the fluid part, and on heating between 116° and 118° F. with 10 per 
cent, sulphuric acid no marked change was observed, the colour remaining pale brown. 
On microscopic examination, it was found to consist of a large quantity of brownish- 
red particles and granules ; of a few oil globules, pieces of vegetable tissue, and small 
colourless fragments of crystals ; and of a large number of broken pieces of vegetable 
hairs, having a close resemblance to those of Strophanthus hispidus. 

Although containing structures apparently derived from Strophanthus seeds, it pro- 
duced no effect when watery solutions from 0*1 grain, 0'2 grain, and 0*5 grain were 
administered by subcutaneous injection to frogs. This negative result is no doubt to be 
explained by the long soaking in spirit and brine to which the arrow-heads had accident- 
ally been subjected. At the same time, the microscopic examination seems to confirm 
Mr Buchanan's statement that the arrows had been poisoned with the Kombe poison. 

Arrow G (see Plate II.). — Mr Buchanan has more recently (1885) sent me four entire 
and uninjured arrows, also obtained from the Shire' district. They all have the form 
represented in Plate II. fig. G. The total length is 37 inches, and the shaft consists of a 
stout bamboo cane 29^ inches long and from T 'yth to ^th of an inch in diameter. This 
shaft is provided with nine feathers, each about 3 inches long, fixed by being inserted into 
parallel slits in the cane, and also by lashing with tendon at the upper part. The lower 



DE THOMAS E. FEASER ON STEOPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 971 

ends of the feathers are 1-| inch above the bowstring notch of the arrow. The iron head 
is inserted into a hollow in the cane, which is strengthened at the hollowed part by a 
cord, consisting of a tendon lashed round it for 3 inches. The exposed portion of the 
head is 7\ inches long, and the poison surrounds its straight portion, which is nearly 6 
inches in length, in a layer of -|th of an inch in thickness. The barbed head is altogether 
2\ inches long, and it is If inch wide at the broadest part, which is at the ends of the 
barbs. The barbed head terminates in a rounded extremity, the barbs being sharply pointed , 
and one lateral half of each surface of the head is concave, while the other is convex. 
The poison is of a brownish colour, with grey spots ; it is smooth on the surface, has an 
earthy fracture, no odour, but a strongly bitter taste. On microscopic examination it 
was seen to consist of fragments of vegetable tissue, oil globules, numerous pieces of broken 
hairs, and yellow granular particles. 

With solution of potash, the fluid, portion acquired a faint yellowish tinge, and with 
10 per cent, sulphuric acid, at a temperature of 110° to 118° F., it became green in 
colour, but soon the green colour was replaced by brown, and afterwards by a faint dirty 
violet colour. 

The portion dissolved by water from ^th of a grain was administered by sub- 
cutaneous injection to a frog weighing 335 grains. It produced in a short time the 
ordinary phenomena of Strophantlms poisoning. The heart was exposed one hour and 
thirty minutes after the administration, and found to be motionless and inexcitable by 
stimulation, with the ventricle pale and small, and the auricles dark and distended. 
Twenty minutes afterwards, reflex movements could yet be excited by feeble irritations 
of the skin. 

Arrow H (see Plate II.) is one of a pair for which I am indebted to Mr J. K. 
Tomory, M.B., who, for a short time in 1887, resided at the London Missionary Society's 
Station in Central Africa. Dr Tomory informs me that the arrows were obtained from 
one of the Manyuema tribes on the west side of Lake Tanganyika. They were said to 
be used only for killing game, and the poison was believed to have an action like that of 
strychnine, and to be derived from a large tree. 

The arrow is altogether 30^ inches in length. The shaft is made of a single piece of 
fine-grained, reddish-brown light wood, 27 \ inches in length, and T 6 ff ths of an inch in 
diameter near the head, but x^-ths of an inch in diameter near the bowstring end. The 
feathering commences at If inch from the notch, and extends up the shaft for If inch. 
It is very elaborate, consisting of fifteen separate feathers placed parallel to each other, 
and securely lashed to the shaft at each end. The arrow-head is inserted into a hollow 
in the shaft, so that almost no portion of its straight stem projects beyond the wooden 
shaft, the base of the expanded barbed head being, therefore, almost in contact with the 
end of the wooden shaft. The end of the shaft into which the head is inserted is 
strengthened by a vegetable thong (apparently consisting of a rush) lashed round it for a 
distance of 4| inches. The barbed head is 3 inches long and If inch wide at its broadest 
part ; it is of a general oval acuminate shape, and is provided with a sharp spike-like 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 I 



972 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

barb on each side, originating near the junction of the lowest third with the middle third 
of the head. 

The poison is plastered over each surface of the head in a thick layer, for the most 
part -g-th of an inch thick, which covers the whole head, excepting its margins and the 
spike-like barbs. It is tough and hard, dark brown on the surface, and ochry-brown in 
the interior. It is partly soluble in water, and gives a slightly gritty sensation when 
triturated with it ; and the watery solution is nearly colourless, acid in reaction, and 
distinctly bitter. 

On microscopic examination, the poison was found to consist of vegetable tissues, 
pieces of vegetable hairs, oil globules, and brown granular masses. Solution of potash 
caused it to become yellowish-brown in colour ; and, after it had been added, numerous 
microscopic, oval or kidney-shaped, colourless bodies made their appearance in the 
mixture. When heated between 110° and 120° F. with 10 per cent, sulphuric acid, 
it became green, and some time afterwards a faint violet tint could be detected. 

The solution obtained by triturating xV^ n °f a g ram with 4 minims of distilled water 
was injected under the skin of a frog weighing 325 grains. In a short time the peculiar 
attitude of Strophanthus poisoning was assumed, the mouth was frequently opened, the 
respirations became slow, the pupils contracted, fibrillary twitches occurred, voluntary 
movements were enfeebled, and the skin became paler in colour. The heart was exposed 
thirty-six minutes after the poison had been injected; it was found to be motionless, with 
the ventricle small and mottled, and the auricles large and dark, and irritation of any 
part of the heart failed to excite contraction. Twenty minutes afterwards, general and 
feeble reflex movements followed irritation applied to the skin. [At no time during 
the experiment were there any spasms, nor were the reflex movements in the slightest 
degree exaggerated. 

It appeared that some assistance might possibly be obtained in the identification of 
the poison of the arrows and in the packet, by determining whether a glucoside were 
present in any of them, especially as the active principle of Strophanthus is a glucoside. 
It was, however, found that this assistance could not easily be obtained, for each of the 
poisons reduced Fehling's solution before the poison had been digested with an acid. 

In Table I. (p. 973) the results of the examination of the arrow-poisons have been 
summarised. 

From the above experiments I am led to conclude that the poison of arrows A, B, 
E, F, G, and H consists principally, if not entirely, of a substance made with the seeds of 
Strophanthus. In reference to arrow C, no results were obtained sufficient to identify the 
substance with which it had been poisoned ; nor, in the meantime, can any more definite 
statement be made with regard to arrow D than that its poison is a substance closely 
resembling Strophanthus in pharmacological action. This substance also sufficiently 
resembles the poison contained in the packet J to lend confirmation to the statement of 
the natives of the Wanyika tribe, that the poison in the packet is the same as that applied 
to the arrow D. If this poison be prepared from Strophanthus seeds, the seeds must have 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



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974 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

been subjected to some process, by which, probably, a watery extract had been obtained, 
almost perfectly free from vegetable structures in the case of the poison contained in the 
packet J, but less perfectly free from those structures in the case of the poison of arrow D. 
This, in itself, is sufficient to render it doubtful that these poisons have been derived from 
Strophanthus ; for the preparation of an extract of its seeds for application to arrows 
would seem a superfluous labour, and it is actually proved to be superfluous in the case of 
the arrows undoubtedly poisoned with Strophanthus, where the only preparation has been 
to grind the seeds with water and mix the paste with some adhesive substance. This 
circumstance, along with the differences in microscopic appearance and in chemical 
reaction that have been described, renders it possible, if not probable, that the poison of 
arrow* D and the poison contained in the packet J have been obtained from a stem or 
root, Sir John Kirk informs me that at Nyassa an active poison is prepared from a 
wood ; and it is also known that the Somali tribe, inhabiting an extensive district on 
the East Coast north from the Wanyika country, employ for their arrows a poison derived 
from the wood and root of an unknown Apocynaceous plant, apparently belonging to the 
genus Carissa. Further, both Sir John Kirk and Dr Felkin state that the Strophanthus 
plant has not been seen in the Wanyika country. These considerations render it advisable 
to restrict the definition of the poison of arrow D and of packet J to that of a substance 
acting like, but not demonstrated to be, Strophanthus. 

It is, however, a remarkable circumstance that, out of eight arrows of different 
forms, six arrows, derived from districts so widely separated from each other as the 
River Gambia, the Tanganyika Lake, and the Zambesi River, should be poisoned with 
Strophanthus. 

Nor do these represent all the known variations in the form of arrows poisoned with 
this substance, and all the localities in which such arrows are used. Three other forms, 
derived from the Gaboon district of West Africa, have been described ; two made entirely 
of wood,* and the third, provided with an iron head ;t but all three having the shaft 
feathering replaced by a leaf, and, judging from the absence of a bowstring notch, being 
adapted for use in crossbows or blow-tubes only. 

The wide distribution of the Strophanthus plant over Africa, the great activity of 
its seeds, and the readiness with which they can be converted into a form suitable for 
application to arrows, are probable reasons for this extensive use of Strophanthus as an 
arrow-poison. 

While thus widely used, both in the chase and in warfare, as an arrow-poison, it is 
worthy of remark that no evidence can be found of Strophanthus being used by the natives 
of Africa as a medicinal substance. On the contrary, Mr Buchanan informs me that they 
have too great a dread of it to use it in the treatment of disease, and that when they 
were told that the seeds were being used as a medicine in this country they expressed the 
opinion that the English must be mad to employ so poisonous a substance for medicinal 
purposes. 

* Polaillon et Carvillk, Archives de Physiologie, tome iv., 1871-72, p. 708. 
t R. Blondkl, Bulletin Gdn&ral de Thirapeutique, tome cxiv., 1888, p. 78. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 975 



2. Botanical Description. 

Decandolle, in 1802, first described the genus Strophanthus, and gave it this 
name because of the twisted thong-like prolongations of the lobes of the corolla 
(<TTp6(t>o$, a twisted band or cord or thong, avOog, a flower). # It is a genus in the 
family of the Apocynacese, nearly related to Nerium and Echites, and even more so to 
Roupellia, which differs from it almost alone in being devoid of the prolongations of the 
corolla-lobes. 

The genus is thus described by Bentham and Hooker :t — " Calyx 5-partitus, basi 
intus 5-oo -glandulosus (rarius eglandulosus ?). Corolla infundibularis, tubo brevi, fauce 
ample campanulata, squamis ligulisve 10 liberis v. basi perparia connatis instructa; lobi 5, 
contorti, dextrorsum obtegentes in acumen (seu caudam) nunc longissime lineare nunc 
rarius abbreviatum producti. Stamina summo tubo affixa, fauce inclusa, filanientis brevi- 
bus ; antherse sagittatse, plus minus acuminatae, circa stigma conniventes et ei medio 
leviter adhserentes, loculis basi in appendicem vacuam productis. Discus 0. Ovarii 
carpella 2, distincta ; stylus filiformis ; stigma crassum basi in membranam reflexam 
ssepius 5-lobam dilatatum, apicem versus saepius lobis 5-glanduliferis cinctum, apiculo 
conico integro v. 5-fido ; ovula in quoque carpello numerosa, oo -seriata. Folliculi oblongi 
v. elongati, duri, divergentes v. divaricati. Semina compresso-fusiformia, apice in aristam 
longe plumosam producta, inferne coma decidua appendiculata (rarius ecomosa ?). — Arbus- 
culse v. frutices ssepe scandentes, glabri pubescentes v. villosi. Folia opposita, pennivenia. 
Cymse terminales, nunc dense pauciflorse, nunc corymbosse multiflorseque. Flores speciosi 
rarius parvi, albi flavicantes aurantiaci rubri v. purpurei." 

About twenty species are at present known, of which eight are found in Africa. 
Decandolle has himself described four species — S. sarmentosus, of Sierra Leone ; S. lauri- 
folius, of Africa ; S. dichotomies, of India, China, and Java ; and S. hispidus, of Sierra 
Leone. Of the others, the best known are S. Bullenianus, S. capensis, S. Ledienii, S. 
Petersiana, and S. pendulus, all of Africa ; S. brevicaudatus, of Burmah ; S. divergens, 
of China ; S. Griffithii and S. longicaudatus, of Malacca ; and S. Wightianus, of 
India. 

Strophanthus Kombe, described by Oliver,}: and formerly regarded as a distinct 
species, has not been placed in the list, as I understand that Oliver, after an examina- 
tion of further and more complete specimens of the flowers and leaves, now regards it as 
" a variety, a geographical race of S. hispidus." His opinion is "that S. Kombe, of 
East Tropical Africa, is but a mere variety of S. hispidus, and that the differences between 
them are not more considerable than it is reasonable to allow to a species of wide distri- 
bution." Having submitted to this botanist some of the flowers sent to me by Mr 

* Annates du Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, 1802, p. 408; Bulletin des Sciences, par la Societe Philo- 
mathique, Paris, 1802, p. 122. 

t Genera Plantarum, vol. ii. part 2, 1876, p. 714. 

X Hooker's Icones Plantarum, 3rd series, vol. i. part 4, 1871, p. 79, and plate 1098. 



976 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

Buchanan as the flowers of the plant from which the seeds used in the greatest number 
of my experiments had been derived, Professor Oliver expresses the opinion that they 
are the flowers of & hispidus. 

It is, therefore, to the species hispidus that the greatest amount of interest is at 
present attached, for, in all probability, it chiefly has furnished the materials for the 
chemical and pharmacological investigations that have hitherto been made in this country, 
as well as for the therapeutic experience that has been collected within the last fifteen 
years. 

This species is not known to occur elsewhere than in Africa. It appears to be widely 
distributed over that continent, in its tropical and subtropical regions ; having been 
found at various places between the east coast and centre of Africa, above the Victoria 
Falls of the Zambesi (Kirk), on the banks of the Shire River, in the Manganja country, 
and extending northwards to the Murchison cataracts (Buchanan); as well as along a 
large portion of the west coast, in Senegambia, Sierra Leone (Kirk), Guinea, and the 
Niger and Gaboon districts. 

The plant is described by Buchanan* as a strong climber lying in folds on the ground, 
and climbing to the tops of neighbouring trees by forming coils round them. The stem 
is about 3 inches in diameter, and young shoots grow from it, as nearly straight rods, of 
great length. When the stem is cut there exudes from it a milky juice, which is sticky 
and very bitter. The fruit is arranged in pairs, which have the appearance of gigantic 
thorns. He believes that, even under favourable circumstances, a plant will not produce 
flowers and fruit until it is three years of age. 

Sir John Kirk — in a letter dated 1st January 1864, which was sent to me by the 
late Professor Sharpey — gives a similar description. He states that the Kombe plant 
(Strophanthus hispidus) " is a woody climber, growing in the forests both of the 
valleys and hills. The stem is several inches in diameter, and rough on the outside. It 
climbs up the highest trees, and hangs from one to the other like a bush vine." 

There is considerable diversity of statement with regard to the periods of the year at 
which flowers and fruit are borne. At Eastern and Central Tropical Africa it is stated 
by KiRKt and OliverJ to flower in October and November, and by Buchanan in January 
also ; while at Western Africa, Baillon § and Diniau || state that the flowering season is 
in April and May, and Soubeiran,1F on the authority of G. Fontaine, a pharmacist 
employed in the French Naval service, in December. The plant is said to bear fruit at 
East and Central Africa, in June, by Kirk ; and in July, August, and September, by 
Buchanan and Consul Hawes : ## and at West Africa, in June, by BLONDEL,tt Cazaux,}} 
and Diniau. 

* Unpublished letter. t Unpublished letter to Dr Sharpey, 1st January 1864. 

X Loc. cit., p. 79. § Archives de Physiologie, tome iv., 1871-72, p. 526. 

|| Bulletin Ge'ne'ral de The'rapeutique, tome cxiii., 1887, p. 172. 

*T Journal de Pharmacie et de Chimie, 15 Juin 1887, p. 593. 
** Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions, March 3, 1888, p. 748. 
tt Bulletin G4n4ral de The'rapeutique, tome cxiv., 1888, p. 81. 
XX Contributions a Vhistoire me'dicale des Strophanthus. These. Paris, 1887, p. 15. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 977 

Mr Buchanan has at various times sent me specimens of the root, stem, branches, 
leaves, flowers, and fruit,* and has thus provided me with materials for a description of 
the different parts of the plant. I am also indebted for specimens and for valuable infor- 
mation to Sir John Kirk, Mr John Moir of the African Lakes Company, and Messrs 
Burroughs and Wellcome and Messrs Christy & Co., drug merchants, London. 

Root. 

The root consists of a main portion, which is swollen and constricted at irregular 
intervals, and of secondary roots, some of which are also swollen and marked by 
narrow constrictions like the main root. The specimens received from Mr Buchanan 
were preserved in spirit, and when they were compared with fresh roots taken from 
plants growing in the Botanic Garden of Edinburgh, it was seen that they had 
retained their original shape. They are in pieces of from 3| to 15 inches in length; 
but, as the extremities are broken, the length of the entire root cannot be ascertained. 
The pieces are straight or slightly curved, of a dark brown colour, and wrinkled by 
furrows extending in the direction of the long axis of the root. The extremities of 
the pieces are from xfths to T Vths of an inch in diameter. The swollen portions are 
from ^ths to 2^§ths of an inch in length, and from x^ths to l^|ths of an inch in 
diameter, and they have an irregularly oval, ovoid, or spindle shape. The portions of the 
root occupied by the constrictions have a diameter varying from y^ths to T -^-ths of an 
inch (Plate III. figs. 1 and 2). When sections are made through the root, it is seen that 
the swellings or enlargements are caused by a development of the cellular rind of food- 
storing cells, which at the constricted portions is present only as a relatively thin layer 
surrounding the central wood cylinder (Plate III. figs. 3 and 4). In addition to the 
constrictions or deep furrows involving the entire circumference of the root, there are 
other transverse furrows which are less deep, and which extend along a portion only of 
the circumference of the swollen parts of the roots (Plate III. figs. 1 and 2). 

In specimens of the dried root, of which I have received several from Sir John Kirk, 
the masses of hypertrophied cellular-rind occur as soft, friable, and very irregularly- 
shaped and wrinkled swellings, separated from each other in many places by intervals of 
a quarter of an inch, where the hard cylindrical core of woody tissue is exposed. 

The microscopic structure of the root is illustrated in Plate V. fig. 1. 

* The obstacles which Mr Buchanan has had to contend with in procuring and sending specimens, owing to 
tribal feuds and the difficulties of carriage, are illustrated in the following extracts from one of his letters : — " Your 
letter about Strophanthus came duly to hand when I was at Zomba, standing by my property in case of an attack from 
the Mangoni, who were ravaging the country on the high lands on this side (Blantyre) of the Shire River. One of my 
boys who belongs to the river was actually on the road to the river to get a supply when news came of the death of 
Mr Fenwick and Chipitula, and for long no person dared to go to the river. When these difficulties were got over, 
the Mangoni came, and I had to go to Zomba, and remain there until they took their departure. Lately, however, I 
have got a supply, and as I have arranged to come home in December, I shall take the Strophanthus with me. Unless 
special care be taken, it is sure to be damaged owing to leaky boats and canoes. The African Lakes Company's 
steamer is at present undergoing repairs, otherwise I should have sent the Strophanthus by her." (21st October 
1884.) 



978 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

Stem and Branches. 

Specimens of the stem were received, both dry and preserved in spirit. They vary 
in diameter from l^ths to l T %ths of an inch. The dry specimens, equally with those 
preserved in spirit, have a cork-like surface, which is profusely furrowed by deep branching 
grooves (Plate IV. figs. 1 and 2). In the dry specimens, the cork layer has shrunk so as 
to lay bare at the extremities the underlying hard structures of the stem. In a portion 
of dry stem l T 6 & ths of an inch in diameter, the cork layer was ^ths of an inch in thickness. 
The structure of the stem has been further illustrated in Plate V. figs. 2 and 3, repre- 
senting transverse sections, and fig. 4, a longitudinal section. 

The branches are opposite. Their surface is nearly smooth, and the cork layer is 
thin, thus presenting a marked contrast to the stem ; and they have numerous small, 
irregularly-shaped, pale (greyish-brown) markings. 

Juice of Root, Stem, and Branches. — On examining fresh young plants, raised in the 
Edinburgh Botanic Garden from seeds sent from the Shire district, I found that when 
incisions were made into the roots, stem, or branches, there exuded a considerable 
quantity of juice. From each of these parts it is acid and very bitter, and at first quite 
clear and almost colourless. The juice of the stem is, however, very sticky, and in a 
short time it becomes milky ; but that from the root and branches remains unadhesive 
and non-opalescent. 

Through the kindness of Mr John Moir, I have obtained from Africa a small quantity 
of the exuded juice from the stem of a growing plant. It consists of a slightly opalescent, 
bitter, and acid fluid, in which there is a mass of a plastic caoutchouc-like substance. 

Leaves. 
The leaves are entire, and generally oval acuminate, though occasionally they 
are ovate or obovate and shortly acuminate. The largest of those sent from East 
Central Africa is 5 T 2 ^ths by 2-^gths of an inch, and the smallest l T 9 6 ths by i\ths of an 
inch. They are opposite, and have usually short petioles, but those attached to the 
extremities of branches are sessile or almost so. Both surfaces, the lower rather more so 
than the upper, are well covered with short fine hairs, which are most abundant along 
the veins and margins. The petioles, flower bracts, and terminal branches are also pro- 
fusely hirsute (see Plate III. figs. 5 and 6). 

Flowers. 
The flowers are grouped in terminal cymes, which sometimes contain only four 
or five flowers, but often as many as eight or nine (see Plate III. fig. 6). In the 
specimens in my possession, unexpanded flowers are present with expanded ones in 
the same cyme. The calyx is gamosepalous and five-lobed, each lobe being oval 
acuminate in the expanded flower, and almost linear in the unexpanded flower-bud ; 
and the calyx and its lobes are covered on the outside with numerous fine hairs. 
The corolla is gamopetalous, funnel-shaped, and five-lobed, each lobe being pro- 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 979 

longed into a singular-looking narrow tail (see Plate III. fig. 7). In many of my 
specimens the corolla tails are so long as nine inches, but even these have obviously 
been broken, owing to their brittle condition when in the dry state. In the 
unexpanded flower-bud, each of the prolongations of the corolla appears to be doubled 
on itself, and the five doubled prolongations are twisted together to form a cord- 
like structure, which projects upwards from the flower-bud for a distance of from half an 
inch to two inches, according to the age of the flower (see a in figs. 6 and 7, Plate III.). 
As has been stated, the genus received from Decandolle the name Strophanthus on 
account of this very singular character of the flower ; but the drawings accompanying his 
original descriptions represent the prolongations in expanded flowers as projecting verti- 
cally upwards from the extremities of each corolla lobe, whereas they do so only in the 
unexpanded flowers. In the expanded flowers, the prolongations are no longer bent upon 
themselves and twisted together, but they are unfolded and hang downwards as thread-like 
tails, probably more than 10 inches in length, and about the ^jyih of an inch in diameter, 
which give not only a singular, but, also, a very graceful appearance to the flowers. 

The corolla is about f ths of an inch in length in its undivided portion, and each lobe 
is about f ths of an inch in length from its base to the point where it narrows into 
the thread-like prolongation. Within the corolla, and immediately below the points of 
junction of contiguous corolla lobes, are five deeply bifid scales or appendages, each 
division of which projects upwards and inwards, and is terminated by a rounded blunt 
extremity (Plate III. fig. 8). Below these appendages, at the base of the corolla, are 
seen the five stamens closely surrounding the pistil (Plate III. fig. 8, a). The forms of 
the stamens and pistil are represented in Plate III. figs. 9 and 10. 

In dried specimens, the corolla varies in colour from a brownish to a reddish yellow, 
and the inside is of the same colour as the outside. In the fresh, natural condition, 
judging from the descriptions of Buchanan and Huedelot,* it appears to be of a general 
creamy white colour, with yellow at the base and a few purple spots above. Decan- 
DOLLE,t however, describes the colour of the corolla as orange, and Kirk as yellowish- 
white or pale yellow, J or pale yellowish-green. § 

The external surface of the corolla and of its lobes is hirsute, the hairs being extremely 
fine, short, and pointed, and in the lobes most abundant along their margins. The 
internal surface has only a few very minute hairs, but the ovary is distinctly hirsute. 
The tail-like prolongations of the corolla lobes are likewise hirsute, but very sparsely in their 
unfolded state, although markedly so when they are doubled up and twisted together. 

Fruit. 

The fruit is arranged in pairs of follicles. The follicles in each pair are united together 
at the ventral surfaces in the young state, but they gradually become separated as maturity 
advances by a hinge-like movement at their bases, until when ripe each separated follicle 

* Archives de Physioloyie, tome iv., 1871-72, p. 526. + Loc. cit., pp. 412 and 123. 

X Letter to Dr Sharpet, 1st January 1864. § Letter, dated 4th November 1888. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 K 



980 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

projects from the fruit-stalk almost at a right angle with it, the two follicles forming 
together a nearly straight line, whose extremities are the apices of the follicles (see Plate 
IV. figs. 3, 4). The mature follicles have a general fusiform shape, but frequently they 
taper fairly regularly from the base nearly to the apex, and so present a lanceolate con- 
tour. The middle portion, however, is generally thicker than either extremity, and the 
base is always much thicker than the apex. The latter is terminated by an irregular bifid 
disc or expansion, measuring transversely about T Vths by T \ths of an inch, the sulcus of 
which is at right angles to the ventral surface of the follicle. This bifid expansion may 
be produced by an indentation remaining after the style has fallen off, or, in the event 
of the style being persistent, it may represent the cleft apex of the stigma. Each follicle 
has two surfaces ; one rounded and occupying the greater part of the circumference, and 
the other flattened, concave, or even wedge-shaped, and representing the surface originally 
in apposition to the follicle developed along with it. 

The rounded surface is of a dark greyish-brown colour, smooth and fleshy-looking in 
the undried follicles, but rough and marked by numerous small and nearly white spots* 
in the dried follicles (see Plate IV. fig. 3). The flattened or concave surface is in the 
dried follicles of a pale brown nearly white colour. It consists of a thin parchment-like 
and brittle membrane, whose margins are depressed below the contiguous margins of the 
rounded surface, and it presents a central longitudinal slit, and occasionally, when the 
follicle is very ripe, several slits at different parts of its surface, through which the silky 
hairs of the seed-appendages project here and there. 

The dimensions and weights of the entire and dry mature follicles vary considerably. 
Of sixteen sent by Buchanan from the Shire district, it was found that the average length 
was 11*2 inches, the average diameter at the middle 1*2 inch, and the average weight 377 
grains : but the extremes were represented by a follicle 12-e, inches in length, 1 inch in 
diameter, and 512 grains in weight ; and by one 9^ inches in length, 0"85 inch in diameter, 
and 160 grains in weight. 

Only a few entire follicles have, however, been brought to this country. The great 
bulk of those imported have had the outer part of the pericarp, comprising the epi- and 
mesocarp scraped off before importation, and while they are in a fresh and soft con- 
dition (see Plate II. fig. I.). They are thus customarily treated in Africa to enable them 
more easily to be dried and stored for use; and, when dried, they are tied together with 
ribbon-like strips of palm leaves, so disposed as to encircle the follicles in pairs. Long 
bands of follicles arranged parallel to each other are in this way produced, which are then 
rolled into cylindrical bundles each containing from two to three hundred follicles. 

The scraped follicles retain the general form of the entire ones, but their distal 
extremities are not terminated by the bifid expansions found in the follicles that have not 
been scraped. Many of them are fusiform, others lanceolate, and a few almost cylindrical 
in shape. They also possess a rounded or convex dorsal, and a flattened or concave ventral 

* Dr Macfarlane has suggested to me that these spots are scars marking the positions of the roots of the fallen off 
hairs, formerly attached to the carpels. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



981 



surface. The former represents the exterior of the endocarp which has been left as a 
covering for the scraped follicle. This covering is of brittle consistence, only about the 
Y^jth of an inch in thickness, externally of a pale brown colour, and marked by irregular 
shallow furrows produced in the scraping of the follicles, and internally smooth and 
of a uniform dull lemon colour. The flattened or concave ventral surface possesses the 
same characters as in the entire follicles. 

Before describing in detail the structures contained within the follicles, some 
particulars will be given of the dimensions and weights of the follicles and of their 
constituent parts. The chief supplies of follicles were obtained from Buchanan in 1879, 
1881, and 1885, and they were all collected in the Shire district. No important 
differences could be detected between the follicles, or their constituent parts, received at 
these several dates, in respect of their general characters, chemical or pharmacological 
properties, or microscopic structure. 

Entire Follicles. — The dimensions and weights were ascertained of the constituent 
parts of two only of the dry entire follicles. 

Table II. 



Follicle. 


Seeds. 


Weight of 
Pericarp. 


Weight of 
Placenta. 


Weight of 

Comose 

Appendages. 


Length. 


Maximum 
Diameter. 


Weight. 


Number. 


Weight. 


11-65 inches 
10-75 „ 


1-5 inch. 
1-25 „ 


509 grains 
401 „ 


222 
212 


100 grains 
84 „ 


352 grains 

266 „ 


17 grains 
15 „ 


40 grains 
35 „ 



Scraped Follicles. — The dimensions and weights of a large number of scraped follicles 
and of their constituent parts have, however, been ascertained. I have below tabulated, 
separately, the results of the detailed examination of considerable numbers of follicles 
from the supplies received in each of the above three years, giving only the averages 
for each supply: — 

Table III. 



Supply of 


Number 
Examined. 


Follicles. 


Seeds. 


Weight of 

Endocarp and 

Placenta 

(grains). 


Weight of 

Comose 

Appendages 

(grains). 


Length 
(inches). 


Maximum 

Diameter 

(inch). 


Weight 
(grains). 


Number. 


Weight 
(grains). 


1879 
1881 
1885 


116 

149 

72 


1044 

11-8 

10-3 


0-75 

0-88 
0-82 


143-2 
200-8 
191-7 


169-3 

185-8 
189-1 


63-88 

70-4 

76-3 


46-16 

83 

70-7 


31-08 

45-9 

40-9 



The figures in the above table, it will be understood, are merely the average 



982 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



dimensions and weights obtained by dividing the totals for each group of follicles by the 
number of follicles. They show considerable differences in the averages of the follicles 
obtained in different years from the same district. The differences in the follicles of 
each year are still more considerable, and this may be illustrated by stating the dimen- 
sions and weights of the largest and smallest follicles, and of their constituent parts, among 
those examined from the supplies obtained in each of the three years : — 

Table IV. 





Follicle. 


Seeds. 


Weight of 
Endocarp 

and 
Placenta. 


Weight of 

Comose 

Appendages. 


Length. 


Maximum 
Diameter. 


Weight. 


Number. 


Weight. 


( Lamest, 
1879. \ 

1 Smallest, 

( Lamest, 
1881. \ 

I Smallest, 

l Largest, 
1885. 1 h ' 
I Smallest, 


11-0 ins. 
8-25 „ 

12-5 „ 
10-25 „ 

13-12 „ 

8-87 „ 


0-75 in. 
0-62 „ 

1-12 „ 
0-62 „ 

1-0 „ 
0-63 „ 


200 grs. 
53-5 „ 

317 „ 
110 „ 

340-5 „ 
114 , „ 


187 
51 

187 
54 

230 

144 


106 - 5 grs. 
14 „ 

134 „ 
44 „ 

164 „ 
32 


60 grs. 
29 „ 

126 „ 
49 „ 

112 „ 
54 „ 


32-5 grs. 
11 ,, 

53 „ 
16-5 „ 

62 „ 

28 „ 



From the data given in Table III., it appears that the average length of the 337 
scraped follicles there represented is 10*8 inches, and the average weight 178*6 grains. In 
order to obtain some indication of the dimensions and weights of the constituent parts 
of average follicles, twenty follicles, whose size and weight were about the average, were 
selected from the supply of 1885, and an analysis, similar to that shown in Table III., 
was made of their constituent parts. The twenty selected follicles varied in length from 
9*5 to 1T5 inches, and in weight from 172'25 to 198 grains. The results are stated 
below in averages. 



Table V. — Average Weight and Dimensions of Twenty Follicles of Average Size, and Averages of their 

Constituent Parts. 



Follicles. 


Seeds. 


Weight of 
Endocarp. 


Weight of 
Placenta. 


Weight of 

Comose 

Appendages. 


Length. 


Maximum 
Diameter. 


Weight. 


Number. 


Weight. 


10-75 ins. 


0-76 in. 


181-5 grs. 


197-2 


90-5 grs. 


43-7 grs. 


16'4 grs. 


30-3 grs. 



On comparing the figures in this Table with those in Table III., the most noteworthy 
difference between them is seen to be that in the twenty follicles selected as average-sized 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



983 



follicles, the average number and weight of the seeds in each follicle is greater than in 
the 337 unselected follicles. 

A few of the scraped follicles in my possession, obtained from Mr Buchanan in 1885, 
are, however, of greater length than any of those represented in Tables III. and IV. 
Their form, also, is nearly cylindrical ; but, while the seeds contained in them have the 
same characters as those in the fusiform and lanceolate follicles, these seeds are of relatively 
light weight, and, apparently, insufficiently ripened. Several of the follicles are from 
15 to 17 inches in length, but one of 17 inches weighed only 165 grains, and one of 
15 inches only 146 grains. In a follicle 15 inches long, the diameter at the base is 
075 inch, at the middle 0"65, and at the apex 0"59 ; and in another, also 15 inches long, 
the respective diameters are 0'59, 0*62, and 0'53 inch. 

The average number of seeds in each follicle of the 337 represented in Table III. is 
180*8, and the average weight of the seeds in each follicle is 69 "4 grains. In the twenty 
follicles of average size and weight represented in Table V. , the average number of seeds 
in each follicle is 197% and the average weight of the seeds in each follicle is 90*5 grains. 

These averages are, however, much above and below the numbers and weights actually 
found in many follicles. This is illustrated by the following examples : — 



Table VI. 



Follicles containing the -j 


Largest Number of 
Seeds. 


Smallest Number of 
Seeds. 


Greatest Weight of 
Seeds. 


Smallest Weight of 
Seeds. 






Number 

of 

Seeds. 


Weight 

of 
Seeds. 


Number 

of 

Seeds. 


Weight 
of 
Seeds. 


Weight 
of 

Seeds. 


Number 

of 

Seeds. 


Weight 

of 
Seeds. 


Number 
of 

Seeds. 


In the 337 

Follicles 

represented ■< 

in 
Table III. 

In the 20 F 

age size 
presented 


Follicles of 1879 
„ 1881 

„ 1885 


228 
223 
215 
205 


40 grs. 
53 „ 

79-5 „ 
74 „ 


51 

76 
91 
98 


1 4 grs. 
19 „ 
36 „ 
58-5 „ 


106 grs. 

100 „ 
99 „ 
99 ,. 


. 187 
204 
194 
192 


14 grs. 
19 „ 
24 „ 
29 „ 


51 

76 

137 

109 


281 
265 
251 
250 
246 
245 


60 „ 
45-5 „ 
105 „ 
53 „ 
75 „ 
81 „ 


54 
61 
74 
75 
85 
101 


44 „ 
49 „ 
17 „ 
43 „ 
57 „ 
53-5 „ 


179 „ 
153 „ 
145-5,, 
141-5,, 
134 „ 
128 „ 


219 
220 
244 
222 
187 
154 


27-5 „ 
32-5 „ 
33 „ 
36-5 „ 
36-5 „ 
38 „ 


215 

207 
187 
145 
87 
124 


244 
234 
234 
232 


67 „ 

48-5 „ 

90 „ 

109 „ 


92 
109 
114 
129 


61 „ 

57 „ 

101 „ 

57 „ 


155 „ 
139 „ 
137 „ 

122 „ 


174 
178 
173 
193 


32 „ 
34-5 „ 

36 „ 

37 „ 


144 
146 
170 
154 


ollicles of aver- i 
and weight re- • 
in Table V. ( 


235 
229 
226 


96-5 „ 
98-5 „ 
90 „ 


112 
141 
142 


73 „ 
79 „ 

72 „ 


1075,, 
98-5 „ 
97 „ 


204 
229 
202 


72 „ 

73 „ 
79 „ 


142 
112 
141 



A transverse section of a green immature follicle is shown, unmagnified, in Plate IV. 
fig. 5, and of one slightly magnified in Plate V. fig. 5. In the latter figure, the several 



984 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



layers of the pericarp become apparent, and it is seen how great is the thickness of the 
mesocarp relatively to the other layers. When the follicle is mature and dry, the pericarp 
becomes much thinner, the reduction in thickness being mainly caused by shrinking of 
the mesocarp. This is rendered apparent when the above illustrations are compared 
with figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6 in Plate VII., and also by the measurements given below of the 
transverse section of the pericarp and its layers in a mature and in an immature follicle : — 



Epicarp, 

Mesocarp, 

Endocarp, 



Immature Undried Follicle. 

0-0097 inch. 
02559 „ 
0-0078 „ 



02734 



0-00025 metre. 

0-0065 

00002 



0-00695 



Epicarp, 

Mesocarp, 

Endocarp, 



Mature Dry Follicle. 

01 inch. 
005 „ 

001 „ 



0-00025 metre. 
00013 
0-00025 „ 



0-07 



0-0018 



The mesocarp contains numerous vascular fibres arranged in isolated bundles (see Plate 
V. figs. 5 and 56). The structure of the endocarp is illustrated in Plate V. figs. 5, 5c, and 
5c?, and the explanation of its hardness is seen in the elongated indurated cells of which 
it is composed. The circumferential direction of the cells in the inner of its two layers 
(next the cavity of the follicle) and the longitudinal direction of those in its outer layer 
(next the mesocarp) is also shown in these illustrations. 

Contents of the Follicles. — When the interior of a mature follicle is examined, it is 
found to contain three different structures, namely, (a) the placenta, (b) the seeds 
with their attached comose appendages, and (c) a quantity of fine downy hairs, for the 
most part loose in the interior. 

(a) The placenta is attached to the inverted carpellary margins, which project into 
the interior of the follicle in its immature condition, and which, as maturity advances, 
become split into the two plates that together form the placental or ventral surface of 
the follicle. The placenta also subdivides into two portions, each of which curves round 
into one of the lateral halves of the interior of the follicle. In a transverse section of 
the follicle, each lateral half of the interior is, therefore, seen to be occupied by a curved, 
almost completely spiral placental membrane (Plates IV. fig. 5 ; V. fig. 5 ; and VII. figs. 
3, 4, 5, and 6). In the dry follicle, the concave surface of the curved portion of the 
placenta is smooth, shining, and, like the interior surface of the endocarp, of a pale lemon 
colour ; and the convex surface is of much the same grey colour as the nearly flat or 
concave exterior ventral surface of the follicle, with which surface, indeed, it is continuous. 
This curved portion of the placenta is marked by a number of depressions or pittings, 
caused by the pressure of the seeds in contact with it. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 985 

When a transverse section of the placenta in a mature follicle is examined micro- 
scopically, it is seen to consist of a broad cellular centre in which are numerous islands 
of vascular bundles, bounded on each side by several layers of elongated cells. On the 
concave surface of the placenta, the cells constituting the surface layer are of larger 
size than the other elongated cells next them, and they appear to be continuous 
with the circumferentially elongated and indurated cells of the inner surface of the 
endocarp, from which, however, they differ in being less elongated and nonindurated. 
In a longitudinal section, the cells on both surfaces of the placenta are seen to be of con- 
siderably greater length than in a transverse section, and the actual long axis of each cell 
is, therefore, parallel with the long axis of the follicle. 

(6) The seeds which in the green condition of the follicles are attached to the convex 
surface of the curved portion of the placenta are, in the mature, dry follicles, unattached, 
and, therefore, merely in contact with the placenta and the interior of the endocarp, 
from the latter of which, however, they are separated by the loose downy hairs referred 
to above (described under c, p. 989). They are of a brownish-fawn colour, but in certain 
lights they are nearly white, owing to the numerous shining hairs which closely cover 
their surface, and give to the seeds a soft velvety feeling. When placed in water they float 
on the surface, and, if left in the water, they remain floating for many days. They have 
an intensely bitter taste, but no odour until they are bruised, when at first the odour is 
not unpleasant, having some resemblance to oatmeal, but after a considerable time, 
especially if the bruised seeds be exposed to the air, it becomes oily and somewhat 
rancid. They are flattened and have two surfaces, but their shape varies considerably, 
especially in immature seeds, owing to the distortions that occur during the change 
from the moist to the dry state. Most frequently, in well-matured seeds, the shape 
is oval acuminate, though occasionally it is elliptical. The dorsal surface is usually 
convex or nearly flat, and has a depression near the apex, and frequently also several 
slight longitudinal ridges, no doubt caused by puckering of the testa and shrinking of the 
albumen during drying (Plate IV. fig. 6). The ventral or placental surface is always 
irregular, the chief and most constant irregularity being caused by a ridge near its 
middle line occupying two-thirds or three-fourths of the upper part of the seed (Plate IV. 
fig. 7a). On this ridge, generally at the junction of the upper fourth with the lower 
three-fourths of the seed, there is a minute whitish spot or projection (Plate IV. figs. 7a 
and 86, x). The ridge is produced by the raphe of the seed, and the minute spot on it 
represents the funiculus, broken off at its attachment to the seed. The base of the seed 
is usually pointed, sometimes acutely, at other times bluntly ; but, occasionally, it is 
quite rounded and even flattened. Towards its apex, the seed most frequently tapers 
gradually to a fine extremity, which is continued as a slender shaft or stalk, whose 
summit is crowned by a tuft of long silky hairs, this shaft and tuft or coma forming the 
peculiar plumose appendage of the seed. The entire seed, with its plumose appendage, 
has a striking and beautiful appearance, and in its general form it closely resembles an 
arrow: the seed representing the head; the slender prolongation of the testa of the seed, 



986 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

the shaft ; and the long silky hairs that crown the summit of the stalk, the feather of 
the arrow (Plate IV. fig. 6). 

The tuft of hairs forming the coma of the seeds has generally a conical outline, with 
the apex of the cone pointing downwards ; and the summit of the tuft is usually dome- 
shaped, but at times it has the form of a hollow cone. The hairs next to the seed proceed 
from the stalk at an angle of about 70°, but higher up the stalk the angle gradually 
becomes more acute, so that at the upper third it is about 40°, while at the further 
extremity the hairs are nearly parallel with the axis of the stalk. 

In a few follicles the coma has been found to be nearly cylindrical in form, with all 
the hairs placed nearly at right angles with the stalk. 

The dimensions and weights of the seeds vary greatly. 

Of twenty selected on account of their large size, the average length w r as 0'8 inch, 
the average maximum width 0'156 inch, the average thickness from one flat surface to 
the other 0*065 inch, and the average weight 0*78 grain. 

Of twenty selected on account of their small size, the average length was 0*5 grain, 
the average maximum width 0*118 inch, the average thickness 0'058 inch, and the average 
weight 015 grain. 

In order, if possible, to obtain a nearer approach to the average dimensions and weight 
of the seeds, twenty were taken without selection from the seeds contained in the twenty 
average-sized follicles from Buchanan, referred to at page 982, and it was found that the 
average length was 0*686 inch, the average maximum width 0*143 inch, the average 
thickness 0*083 inch, and the average weight 0*586 grain. These great variations are, 
indeed, such as might have been anticipated in seeds obtained from plants in which, of 
necessity, the conditions of maturity, season, and locality of growth could not be the 
same. The averages which the figures represent cannot, therefore, be regarded as true 
for all collections of seeds. This was further exemplified in the case of a large quantity 
of seeds very liberally given to me in 1886 by Mr Mora, of the African Lakes Company, 
of which twenty, likewise taken without any selection, had an average length of 0*7 inch, 
an average maximum width of 0'16 inch, an average thickness of 0*088 inch, and an 
average weight of 0'66 grain. 

It may, however, be stated that good mature seeds have a length of from 0*6 to 0*7 
inch, and a maximum width of from 0*14 to 0*16 inch ; although they may be so large as 
1 inch in length and 0*18 inch in maximum width. 

It is also difficult to define the average weight of the seeds. Deduced from the figures 
in Table III., the average weight of each seed in the examined follicles of 1879 is 0'376 
grain, in those of 1881 it is 0*379 grain, and in those of 1885, 0*403 grain ; and for the 
collective follicles of these three years, 0*386 grain. The average weight, however, of each 
seed in the largest follicle of 1879 is 0*57 grain, and in the smallest 0*27 grain; in the 
largest follicle of 1881 it is 0*71 grain, and in the smallest 0*81 grain ; and in the largest 
follicle of 1885 it is 0*71 grain, and in the smallest 0*22 grain (Table IV.). When these 
figures are considered along with the circumstance that the average weight of each seed 



DR THOMAS R. ERASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



987 



in the twenty follicles of average size (Table V.) is 0'458 grain, the inference may be 
drawn that the average weight of a mature seed of Sti^ophanthus hispidus is from about 
0*4 to 0'6 grain. 

Magnified longitudinal and transverse sections of the seed, and illustrations of its 
microscopical structure, are given in Plate VI., and a somewhat diagrammatic repre- 
sentation of a longitudinal antero-posterior section in Plate VII. fig. 1. In the latter, 
the raphe and funiculus are shown. 

While great variations are met with in the length of the plumose appendage of the 
seed, it may in general terms be stated to be shortest in the smallest and lightest follicles, 
and longest in the largest and heaviest. The variations may be illustrated by the fol- 
lowing measurements of the appendages of seeds from the upper, middle, and lower parts 
of three follicles, the follicles themselves being representative of those of small, medium, 
and large size (Table VII.) 

Table VII 



Follicle. 



Length. 



8 inches, 



10 „ 



16 



Weight. 



135 grains, < 



194 „ i 



312 T„- 1 



Position of Seed 
in Follicle. 



Top, . 
Middle, 
Base, . 
Top, . 
Middle, 
Base, . 
Top, . 
Middle, 
Base, . 



Coraose Appendage. 



Length of 
Naked 
Portion. 



0-96 inch. 
1-03 „ 



1-28 
109 

0-96 
0-81 

1-18 

1-25 

1-21 
1-31 

1-56 
1-09 

2-87 
2-81 

312 
253 

2-09 
2-25 



Length of 
Tuft. 



1-18 inch. 

153 „ 

1-56 „ 

1-81 „ 

1-4 „ 

1-18 „ 

181 „ 

15 „ 

1-96 „ 

1-84 „ 

1-96 „ 

1-81 „ 

2-68 „ 

2-75 „ 

2-81 „ 

2-78 „ 

2-12 „ 

2-218 „ 



Total 
Length. 



2"1 4 inches 
2-56 „ 



2-84 
2-9 

2 36 
1-99 

2-99 
2-75 

3-17 
315 

3-116 

2-9 

5-55 
5-56 

5-93 
5-31 

4-21 

4-468 



Size of Seed. 



0-53x0-12 inch 
0-5 x009 „ 

0-53x014 „ 
0-56x014 ,, 

0-43x0 14 „ 
0-4 xO-13 „ 

0-68x0-15 „ 
0-68x0-14 „ 

0-65x0-156,, 
0-68x0-13 „ 

0-68x0-12 „ 
0-65x0-09 „ 

0-81x0-2 „ 
0-93x0-18 „ 

0-87x0-2 „ 
0-92x0-19 „ 

0-53x0-156,, 
0-59x0-18 „ 



Weight of 
Seed. 



032 gr. 

03 „ 

0-295 „ 

0-32 ,, 

0-26 „ 

0-15 „ 

0-46 „ 

0-51 „ 

039 „ 

0-44 „ 

0-39 „ 

0-31 „ 

0-45 „ 

0-88 „ 

0-8 „ 

088 „ 

065 „ 

025 „ 



The measurements in the above Table show that the longest comose appendages occur 
at the middle of each follicle, and that the shortest are more frequently at the base than 
at the top. They also show that the tufted portion of the appendage is generally of 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 L 



988 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



greater length than the naked portion, although the difference between them is never 
great. On consideration of details, it is seen that the tuft is slightly longer than the 
naked shaft in the smallest and medium sized follicles, and that in the largest follicle the 
tuft is in some seeds longer and in others shorter than the naked shaft. 

Comose appendages have, however, been met with of greater length than any repre- 
sented in the above Table (VII.). Not uncommonly they are found slightly over 6 inches 
in length in large follicles. I give below the measurements of the comose appendages of 
seeds taken from a follicle 17 inches in length. 







Table VIII. 






Position of Seed in 
Follicle. 


Comose Appendage. 




Length of Naked 
Portion. 


Length of Tuft. 


Total Length. 


Size of Seed. 


Top, . 


(2-62 inches. 
< 2-68 „ 
1 2-92 „ 


3-25 inches. 
3-12 „ 
2-75 „ 


5*87 inches. 

5-8 

5-67 „ 


0-75x0-156 inch. 
0-84x0-156 „ 
0-81x0-175 „ 


Middle, 


(2-78 „ 
\ 2-43 „ 
(2-31 „ 


3-25 

3-12 „ 
3-25 „ 


6-03 „ 
5-55 
5-56 „ 


0-85x0-156 „ 
0-75x0-175 „ 
0-62x0-175 „ 


Base, . 


( 2-34 „ 
< 2-31 
( 2-5 


2-4 

2-31 „ 
306 „ 


4-74 „ 
4-62 „ 
4-56 


0-65x0-14 „ 
0-65x0156 „ 



The measurements in the Table (VIII.) also give further evidence in favour of the 
statement that the tufted portion of the comose appendage is generally longer than the 
naked portion. 

Two or three follicles have been observed in which all the seeds have comose 

appendages of unusually small and uniform size. The dimensions of two entire seeds 

taken from the top, middle, and base, respectively, of one of these follicles were found to 

be as follows : — 

Table IX. 



Position of Seed in Follicle. 


Comose Appendage. 


Size of Seed. 


Weight of 
Seed. 


Length of 
Naked Portion. 


Length of 
Tuft. 


Total Length. 


Top, .... 
Middle, .... 
Base, .... 


/ 0-96 inch. 
1 1-06 „ 

(0-87 „ 
t 0-93 „ 

f0-78 „ 
( 0-87 „ 


1 -03 inch. 
106 „ 

1-09 „ 
1-06 „ 

0-81 „ 
0-87 „ 


1-99 inch 
212 „ 

1-96 „ 
1-99 „ 

1-59 „ 

1-74 „ 


0-46x0-12 inch. 
0-53x0-15 „ 

0-56x012 „ 
0-5 x0-14 „ 

0-5 xO-15 „ 
0-5 xO'12 „ 


0-37 grain. 
0-41 „ 

0-39 „ 
041 „ 

0-4 „ 
0-38 „ 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 989 

The seeds with the small appendages attached to them are very beautiful and graceful 
miniature representations of seeds with larger appendages. The follicle containing the 
above seeds was 10 inches in length, and the seeds themselves were fairly mature, as their 
sizes and weights show. 

The shaft of the comose appendage consists of a prolongation of the testa of the seed. 
It is extremely brittle, and has a diameter of about the one-hundredth of an inch, which 
remains pretty uniform throughout the whole length of the naked portion of the shaft."" 

The hairs in the tufted portion are unicellular, white, silky in lustre, and flexible, but 
yet delicate and easily broken. They vary in length from a little less than 1 inch (0"9) 
to 3 inches. Their diameter at the base is about 0*0022 inch (0*055 mm.), and they 
gradually taper to a fine point of about 0*00012 inch (0*0032 mm.). At the base, there 
is often a slight swelling or bulb. The structure of the hairs is represented in Plate IV. 
figs. 9, 10a, and 10&. 

c. Fine Hairs covering, and longer than the Seeds, and interposed between the Seeds 
and the inner surface of the Endocarp. — When a mature follicle is opened without any 
special precaution, a large quantity of a soft down is seen to be mingled with the seeds, but 
not attached to them. If the dorsal surface of the endocarp be carefully removed so as to 
expose the interior of the follicle, especially after the follicle has been soaked in water 
for a few days, the seeds are found to be concealed by a padding of hairs, interposed 
between the seeds and the inner surface of the endocarp (see Plate VII. fig. 2). The 
hairs constituting this padding appear to originate at the base of each seed, where the 
collected hair-roots are seen as opaque transverse lines. For the most part, the hairs 
proceed directly upwards, so as entirely to cover the dorsal surface, and a portion of the 
comose appendage of the seed from whose base they appear to originate, and, also, a 
part of the next seeds immediately higher up in the follicle and the interspaces between 
them. A few hairs extend downwards. Nearly all the hairs are therefore interposed 
between the dorsal surface of the seeds and the inner surface of the endocarp, and 
between contiguous seeds ; only a small number lying upon the placental (or ventral) 
surface of the seeds. 

The roots of the hairs are generally curved, and as the hairs become swollen above 
the roots, the roots have very commonly a beak-like appearance (see Plate IV. fig. 12a). 
Above the swollen portion, the hairs gradually taper to a somewhat blunt extremity. 
Their length is from 0*657 to 1*12 inch, and their diameter at the end of the root is 
about 0*00052 inch (0013 mm.), at the bulb-like swelling 0*0026 inch (0*065 mm.), 
and at the tip or apex 0*00052 inch (0*013 mm.). Their naked eye and microscopic 
appearances are illustrated in Plate IV. figs. 11, 12a, and 126. 

* The following are the diameters of the naked portion of the shaft of two comose appendages removed from 
two average-sized follicles : — 

Near Base. Near Middle. Near Tuft. 

N , j 0-0112 inch. 0-015 inch. 0-0093 inch. 

' * * \ 028 mm. 0*25 mm. 0-23 mm. 

N ~ ( 0-0108 inch. 0'0092 inch. 0*008 inch. 

' * " ( 0-27 mm. 0-23 mm. 0"22 mm. 



990 DE THOMAS E. FEASER ON STEOPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

The roots of the hairs are firmly pressed against each other, forming the bases of 
tuft-like groups, the individual hairs of which, in undried and immature follicles, are in 
contact and parallel with each other. In dry follicles, however, the hairs, while still 
remaining in contact at the roots, diverge from each other above the roots to an extent 
directly proportional to the dryness and advancement in dehiscence of the follicle 
(Plate IV. fig. 11). 

The structural relationship of these hairs to the seeds is indicated, even in dry mature 
follicles, by the circumstances that the tips of their roots are pointed towards the base of 
the seed from which they appear to originate, that those hairs whose roots point towards 
the centre of the base of seeds curve round the base, and thus acquire their usual vertical 
direction, and that the hairs are found only in the portion of the interior of the 
follicle where the seeds are placed, and, therefore, not at the upper part. # Their 
relationship to the seeds is, however, unambiguously shown when an immature 
undried follicle is examined ; for it is then seen that a tuft of hairs of considerable length 
originates at the base of each seed, and is firmly adherent to it. A group of these hairs 
attached to the base of a seed removed from an immature green follicle is illustrated in 
Plate IV. fig. 13, the hairs having been drawn down from the surface of the seed, in 
order to display them more distinctly. Their probable function is referred to in the 
succeeding paragraphs. 

Dehiscence of the Follicles and Dissemination of the Seeds. — As the follicle matures, 
its ventral or placental surface enlarges by the inverted fused edges of the carpels, which 
project into the interior of the follicle in its immature condition, splitting up more and 
more, and so expanding this surface. The tearing asunder of the inverted carpellary 
edges appears to be mainly produced by the gradual separation from each other of the 
ventral margins of the pericarp, which becomes less and less rounded as maturity and 
drying proceed. The changes produced in this process are illustrated in Plate VII. figs. 
3, 4, 5, and 6, which represent transverse sections of dry follicles in four stages of maturi- 
tion. On comparing fig. 5, Plate IV., or fig. 5, Plate V., with figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6, 
Plate VII., it will also be seen how greatly the pericarp shrinks, especially in its meso- 
carp portion, as maturition and drying advance. Several entire follicles in my posses- 
ion exhibit a still greater degree of flattening of the pericarp and opening up of the 
ventral surface than is shown in Plate VII. fig. 6, but in them some of the contents of 
the follicle, including even a portion of the placenta, have generally escaped from the 
interior. No doubt, the assumption by the pericarp of a flat or nearly flat shape occurs 
in natural conditions when perfect maturity has been attained, and thereby the com- 
plete extrusion of the seeds is rendered possible. 

That the condition of roundness or flatness of the pericarp is greatly dependent on the 
moisture or dryness of its structures ma) 7 be shown by immersing a dry mature follicle in 

* For example, in a follicle 11 inches in length, these hairs were present only in the lower 6§ inches, and this exactly 
corresponded to the part of the follicle where seeds occurred. Above this part the follicle contained only placenta and 
comose appendages. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDTJS. 991 

water. The effect of immersion is a gradual transverse rounding of the pericarp, with a 
corresponding approximation of the placental or ventral edges and a consequent narrow- 
ing of the placental or ventral surface of the follicle. An originally flat entire pericarp, 
one inch and a quarter wide, may in a few hours become so greatly rounded that its 
edges approach to within three-quarters of an inch from each other. If the pericarp be 
then allowed to dry, by merely exposing it to the air at an ordinary temperature, it 
gradually resumes its original flat shape, its edges gradually separating from each other 
to their original distance. If the endocarp alone be immersed in water and then removed 
and allowed to dry, it assumes the same changes of form as the entire pericarp, but 
they are more rapidly accomplished. If the endocarp be removed from the pericarp, 
the conjoined meso- and epicarp also react in the same way as the entire pericarp, or as 
the endocarp alone, under the influence of moisture and dryness. 

The above experiments seem to show that the changes in form are not dependent on 
the anatomical structure of any one part of the pericarp. As the changes occur, however, 
most rapidly and completely in the detached endocarp, the presence in it of elongated 
indurated cells, arranged in circumferential and longitudinal directions (see Plate V. 
figs, be and 5d), may confer, as Blondel * has supposed, on this portion of the pericarp 
a special facility of movement during the change from the condition of moistness to 
that of dryness. It cannot, however, be overlooked that the existence of indurated cells 
in the endocarp would strengthen the entire pericarp, and, by enabling it more effectually 
to resist any bursting force operating in the interior of the follicle, would prevent splitting 
of the follicle elsewhere than at the feebly resisting placental or ventral surface. It will 
afterwards be pointed out that, for the satisfactory extrusion of the seeds, it is of import- 
ance that dehiscence should occur at the ventral surface. 

When the separation of the inverted carpellary edges and the resulting expansion of 
the ventral or placental surface of the follicle has advanced to a certain stage, the latter- 
opens either at the middle line alone, by complete separation of the edges of the two 
previously united carpellary margins, or both at the middle line and at other parts of the 
dried and brittle ventral surface, by several longitudinal splittings. 

The dragging of the inverted carpellary edges from the interior to the surface of the 
follicle induces a change in the position and form of the placenta, which is attached to 
these edges. By this movement it is brought nearer to the ventral surface of the follicle, 
and, as it is being drawn from its original position, its spiral is unfolded (Plate VII. 
figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The seeds, imbedded at maturity in the elastic hairs which surround 
them, and fixed in position, also, by their comose appendages, are unable to accompany 
the placenta in its changes of position, and they thus become detached from it by rupture 
of the now dry and brittle funiculi. 

The actual extrusion of the seeds appears to be produced by the pressure exerted 
upon them by the hairs contained in the follicle, and especially by the long basal seed- 
hairs, which separate the seeds from the endocarp and from each other. These hairs, in 

* Bulletin Ge~n<fral de TMrapeutique, 1888, pp. 100-103. 



992 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

the immature moist follicle, are arranged parallel to and in close contact with each other, 
but in the mature follicle, as the process of drying advances, they acquire elasticity and 
a tendency to diverge and become separated from each other. The basal seed-hairs, being 
interposed between the seeds and the endocarp, thus press the seeds towards the ventral 
or placental surface, and through the openings in this surface ; and the movement out- 
wards of the entire seeds, as well as the extrusion of the placenta, is aided by a similar 
elastic force acquired, during drying, by the hairs of the comose appendages. 

In order to convince oneself of the adequacy of the extruding force of these hairs to 
produce dissemination, it is sufficient to observe a follicle from which the ventral surface 
has been removed. In a short time the contents of the follicle protrude through the 
vacant space, and the protruded seeds, with their appendages, expand into a large loose 
heap, consisting of the seeds mingled with the widely separated basal hairs, and of the 
comose appendages with their hairs now widely diverging from the stalk of the coma. 
On moistening the large heap of seeds and hairs, it soon again shrinks into a small bulk, 
owing to the hairs losing their elasticity, and again becoming closely approximated to 
each other along their whole length. 

The basal seed-hairs, which separate the seeds from the endocarp and from each other, 
and which in mature follicles are no longer attached to the seeds, seem to possess the 
additional function of preventing fracture of the long and brittle shaft of the comose 
appendages, by forming a soft and yielding bed for the seeds, during their changes in 
position before they escape from the follicle. They thus insure that the seeds shall be 
disseminated with their comose appendages attached to them. 

I have not considered it necessary to give a detailed and systematic description of 
the histological characters of each part of the Strophantus hispidus plant. These 
characters are fully illustrated by the figures relating to histological structure in Plates 
III. to VII., in whose preparation I owe much to the kind assistance of Dr Macfarlane, 
of the Botanical Department of the University. The description of the figures (pp. 
1025-1027) will sufficiently explain their more important details. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 993 

B. CHEMISTEY. 
1. Seeds. 

Composition. — In order to ascertain the general composition of the seeds, a weighed 
quantity, after having been carefully powdered, was dried at 100° F. and extracted by 
percolation, first with petroleum ether, boiling below 50° C. (100° F.), and then with 
anhydrous ethyl ether. After the ether had been completely removed by exposure to 
the air and to a moderate heat, the residue was divided into two equal portions, one of 
which was extracted with rectified spirit, and the other with distilled water, and in the 
latter solution the mucilage and albumen were estimated. The water was estimated by 
heating a separate quantity of ground seeds to 212° F. ; and this, also, was used for the 
determination of the inorganic matter by combustion. Stated in percentages, the results 
were — 

Analysis No. 1. 

Water, ............. 6-7 per cent. 

Petroleum ether extract (chiefly fat), . . . . . . . 31-81 „ 

Ethyl ether extract (resin, chlorophyle, &c), ...... 0*845 „ 

Rectified spirit extract (20 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), ... 8 "94 „ 

Water extract, { Mucila S e > • ■ • ■ ?-35 » 

I Albumen, ......... 1*95 „ 

Ash, 3-514 „ 

61-109 
Undetermined constituents, . . . . . . . . . 38 -891 

100000 

Analysis No. 2. 

In a second analysis, in which the same processes were adopted, with seeds from the 
same parcel as those and in the first analysis, the chief results were — 

Water, ............. 6-35 per cent. 

Petroleum ether extract, . . . . . . . . . . 31-725 ,, 

Ethyl ether extract, 0-905 „ 

Rectified spirit extract (20 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), ... 9*1 „ 

Water extract, J Murilaga, 7-142 „ 

I Albumen, 2-03 „ 

In many other analyses, no attempt was made to estimate the water, mucilage, 
albumen, and inorganic matter, but the seeds were merely extracted with ethyl ether 
followed by rectified spirit, or with rectified spirit alone. It was early found that the fat 
and mucilage present in the seeds rendered water an inappropriate menstruum for remov- 
ing the active principle ; and for the same reason even dilute alcohol, in the form of proof 



994 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

spirit, could not conveniently be used, especially when extraction by percolation was 
attempted. The results of a few of these analyses are given below, and in all of them 
the extraction was accomplished by the process of percolation. 

Extraction by Anhydrous Ethyl Ether (sp. gr. 0'7 SO) followed by Rectified Spirit. 

Analysis No. 3. 

581 grains of seeds from Buchanan, 1885, lost on drying 37'99 grains = water, 6*538 

per cent. 

500 grains of the above dried seeds yielded — 

Ethyl ether extract (18 of ether to 1 of seeds), 160*82 grains, . . = 33*96 per cent. 

Rectified spirit extract (18 of spirit to 1 of seeds), 54*93 grains, . . = 10*986 , 

Undetermined constituents, 27132 grains, ...... = 54*26 „ 



99-206 



Analysis No. 4. 

500 grains of dried seeds from Buchanan, 1885 — 

Ethyl ether extract (13 of ether to 1 of seeds), 165 grains, . . . =33*0 per cent. 

Rectified spirit extract (18 of spirit to 1 of seeds), 53 grains, . . . = 10*6 „ 

Undetermined constituents, 280 grains, . . . . . . =56 ,, 



99-6 



Analysis No. 5. 

6000 grains of seeds from Buchanan, 1885 — 

Ethyl ether extract (12 of ether to 1 of seeds), 2164 grains, . . . =36 - 066 per cent. 

Rectified spirit extract (6 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), 48748 grains, = 8*124 „ 

Extraction by Rectified Spirit and subsequent Removal of Fat, &c.,from the Alcoholic 
Extract mixed with Water by frequent agitation with Ethyl Ether. 

In the next analysis, the ground seeds, after having been dried at 100° F., were first 
extracted with rectified spirit, and then the fat, &c, was removed from the alcoholic 
extract by mixing it with a little water and agitating the mixture with successive 
quantities of ether. The residue obtained on the evaporation of this ether is the " ethyl 
ether extract" mentioned in the following analyses, and the " rectified spirit extract " is 
the dry residue obtained by evaporation of the watery solution of the alcoholic extract, 
after this extract mixed with water had been agitated with successive quantities of ether. 

Analysis No. 6. 
4000 grains of seeds from Buchanan, 1885 — 

Rectified spirit extract (12 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), 362*19 grains, = 9*06 per cent. 
Ethyl ether extract, 536865 grains, . 13*421 „ 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 995 

Analysis No. 7 . 

8000 grains of seeds from Buchanan, 1885 — 

Rectified spirit extract (12 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), 70T655 grains, = 8-77 per cent. 
Ethyl ether extract, 1013-416 grains, =12-667 „ 

In this analysis the extraction of the seeds by rectified spirit had been effected by two 

successive percolations. The first percolate of 1*3 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds yielded — 

Rectified spirit extract, 388-755 grains, ..... = 4"859 per cent, of seeds. 
Ethyl ether extract, 260-65 grains, = 3'258 „ 

The second percolate of 10*7 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds yielded — 

Rectified spirit extract, 312-9 grains, ...... = 3-911 per cent, of seeds. 

Ethyl ether extract, 752-765 grains, ...... =9*409 „ 

Analysis No. 8. 

1500 grains of seeds from Buchanan, 1885 — 

Rectified spirit extract (8 of rectified spirit to 1 of seeds), 114-66 grains, = 7 - 664 per cent. 

Ethyl ether extract, 499 grains, = 33-266 „ 

In analyses 3, 4, and 5 the extraction with ether was continued until a colourless 
percolate had been obtained, and the subsequent extraction with spirit was continued 
until the percolate was free, or almost free, from bitterness. In analyses 6, 7, and 8, the 
percolation with spirit was continued until the tinctures were colourless and free, or almost 
free, from bitterness. 

In the analyses in which extraction with ether preceded extraction with rectified spirit, 
the results were fairly concordant. They show that the ether extract, consisting mainly 
of fat, with a small quantity of chlorophyll and of resin, amounts to about 34 per cent., 
and that the alcohol extract, containing the active principle, amounts to about 9 '5 per 
cent, of the seeds. 

When the seeds were first extracted with rectified spirit, and the substances in the 
extract soluble in ether then removed from it, the results varied considerably. This was 
specially apparent in the case of the ether product, but it was also observed in the alcohol 
extract from which the substances soluble in ether had been removed. As will, however, 
be pointed out, in so far as the latter product is concerned, these differences are of com- 
paratively little importance as indications of corresponding variations in the actual 
quantities of active principle present in the seeds. 

Ether Extract. 

The ether extract, whether obtained with ethyl or petroleum ether, consists mainly 
of a liquid fat or oil containing chlorophyll and other colouring matters ; and when 
obtained with ethyl ether, of a small quantity also of resin. It gives a permanent 
translucent stain to paper. Its colour varies considerably, the lightest coloured specimens 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 M 



996 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

being very pale greenish-yellow, and the darkest, brown with a faint tint of green ; the 
chief intermediate shades being grass-green and pale and deep olive-green. The lighter 
coloured ether extracts were usually derived from the later percolates, and the dark 
coloured from the earlier percolates of the same seeds. The extract is translucent and 
clear, but after standing for some time a nearly colourless sediment usually separates, which 
disappears when the extract is heated to 120° F. Ethyl alcohol, amyl alcohol, acetone, 
chloroform, ethyl and petroleum ether, and bisulphide of carbon dissolve the extract freely. 
It has an oleaginous odour, and when dissolved in ether and washed by shaking several 
times with water, it has an oleaginous taste without bitterness. The well- washed ether 
extract does not possess any toxic action, nor indeed any other action than that of a 
bland oil. Its viscosity, and in the paler specimens, its appearance and other characters, 
are very similar to those of olive oil. The specific gravity, determined in a pale yellow 
or greenish-yellow oil, was found to be 0'975, in a pale green oil 0*954, and in a dark 
greenish-brown oil 0'9267. The two former or light-coloured oils, when heated to 120° F., 
and then allowed to cool to the temperature of the laboratory (about 60° F.), became 
semi-solid and uniformly opaque, although previously to this heating they had remained 
for more than twelve months liquid, and, with the exception of a slight deposit, clear 
and translucent, in the same laboratory. When microscopically examined in the opaque 
condition, the oil was found to contain numerous small aggregations of slender, needle- 
shaped crystals. 

In several of the analyses, when the ethereal solution of the oil and other substances 
was shaken with water a thick and persistent emulsion or magma was produced, from 
which, however, the greater portion of the ether, holding oil and chlorophyll in solution, 
gradually separated itself. After this emulsion had been decanted and washed by shaking 
with ether, it was found to contain a small quantity of active principle and of resin, and 
a considerable quantity of mucilage and of a substance possessing the characters of 
caoutchouc. While, as will afterwards be stated, neither common or anhydrous ethyl 
ether dissolve appreciable quantities of the previously separated active principle, when 
the seeds are percolated with ether, or when the alcoholic extract mixed with water is 
shaken with ether, a very small quantity of the active principle appears in the ethereal 
solution. It may, however, be entirely removed from the ethereal solution by shaking it 
several times with water. 

Alcohol Extract. 

On evaporating, with the aid of a gentle heat, the concentrated tincture of the seeds 
previously freed from substances soluble in ether, or a watery solution of this tincture, a 
sweetish mucilaginous and somewhat nutty odour is developed. The extract then assumes 
the appearance of a translucent brownish-yellow or yellowish-brown hard substance, 
having some tenacity. If it be further dried by being placed in vacuo over sulphuric acid, 
it gradually loses its translucency, and becomes opaque, lighter in colour, and brittle. 
The extract is intensely bitter. It is freely soluble in water and in rectified spirit, 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTI! US HISPIDUS. 997 

sparingly soluble in absolute, ethyl alcohol and in amyl alcohol, and insoluble in 
chloroform and in ethyl and petroleum ether. The watery solution has usually a 
distinctly acid reaction. When ether or chloroform ia added to the solution of the 
extract in ethyl or amyl alcohol, the solution immediately becomes opalescent, and an 
amorphous deposit is by and by formed. Occasionally, when ether is added to a very 
dilute solution in rectified spirit, the opalescence is succeeded by the formation at the 
sides and bottom of the vessel of groups of colourless glassy crystals, which, when 
magnified, have the appearance represented in Plate VII. fig. 7. These crystals 
possess the chemical and pharmacological properties, afterwards described, of the active 
principle, strophanthin. 

In several of the processes in which the seeds were extracted with rectified spirit alone, 
after the alcoholic extract had been concentrated to a syrupy consistence, rounded tufts 
or nodules of crystals appeared in it. Under the microscope, these tufts or nodules were 
found to consist of long and very slender radiating crystals. Their appearance, when 
magnified, is shown in Plate VII. fig. 8. The crystals are intensely bitter, very soluble in 
water and in rectified spirit, but much less so in absolute alcohol, and they are insoluble 
in petroleum and ethyl ether and in chloroform. 

In every process in which the seeds were extracted with rectified spirit, and the con- 
centrated extract mixed with water and shaken with successive quantities of ether, the 
dried watery solution was found to consist largely of crystals having the above appearance 
and characters. 

In a few of the analyses where this plan of extraction was adopted, when the extract 
was mixed with a very small quantity of water, and then shaken with ethyl 
ether, the ether assumed a fluorescent satiny appearance, which was found to be 
caused by the diffusion through it of an enormous number of minute particles, which, 
when the mixture was allowed to remain at rest for a short time, formed a deposit at the 
bottom of the ether and therefore at the surface of the underlying strong watery solution. 
On microscopic examination, these particles were also found to consist of minute slender 
acicular crystals, usually united together in small bundles, and having the same general 
characters as those represented in Plate VII. fig. 8. 

When, however, the seeds were extracted with ether previously to being extracted 
with rectified spirit, the alcohol extract, on being concentrated, in no instance exhibited 
to the unaided eye the formation of groups of crystals in it ; and when dried, although 
having the same general appearance and characters as extracts obtained without previous 
percolation of the seeds with ether, this extract, when broken down and examined under 
the microscope, was seen to consist, not of slender acicular crystals, but of irregular crys- 
talline plates, whose appearance was similar to that represented in Plate VII. fig. 9. 

However careful may have been the extraction with ether of the seeds or of the 
alcoholic extract, this extract does not consist of a crystalline substance alone. The 
crystals are mixed with, or imbedded in, other substances of non-crystalline structure, 
whose existence is rendered clear when the extract is further analysed. The further 



998 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

analysis also shows that the quantity of non-crystalline substances varies in different 
extracts, and that one important cause of this variation is the amount of spirit percolated 
through the seeds in the preparation of the extract. 

Composition of the Alcoholic Extract. — On adding to the dried alcohol extract a 
small quantity of rectified spirit, the extract does not entirely dissolve, but a residue 
remains, which is insoluble in a moderate quantity of rectified spirit. When the clear 
alcohol solution thus obtained is mixed with ether, it becomes densely opalescent, but in 
a short time the opalescence clears away, and a translucent amorphous and intensely 
bitter deposit occurs. The decanted and usually clear alcohol-ether solution also yields 
a residue when distilled and evaporated. 

The first of these products is freely soluble in water, forming a mucilaginous solution, 
which reduces Fehling's solution after it has been digested for some hours with a little 
dilute sulphuric acid. The second product agrees with the active principle, for which I 
have proposed the name, strophanthin, in the chemical and pharmacological characters 
afterwards described. The third product is insoluble in water and in acids, soluble in 
rectified spirit and in dilute alkalis, and precipitated from the latter solution by acids, and 
it is, therefore, a resin. 

The quantity of each of these products, in two out of several extracts that have been 
analysed, is stated in Analysis 9 and 11 below — 

Analysis No. 9. 

Alcohol Extract of Analysis No. 1 (p. 993). — Total alcohol extract, 8'94 per cent, of 

seeds. 

Impure strophanthin, ....... 63-367 per cent, of alcohol extract. 

Mucilage, 16-275 „ 

Resin, 14542 „ „ 



94-184 



The total extract (8'94 per cent, of seeds) was, however, the sum total of the extracts 
of three successive percolations of the same seeds ; the first having been obtained by a 
percolation of 10 parts of rectified spirit to 1 part of seeds, the second by a subsequent 
percolation of 5 parts of rectified spirit to 1 of the same seeds, and the third by a 
subsequent percolation of 5 of spirit to 1 of seeds. It is interesting to note the total 
quantity of alcoholic extract obtained from each of these percolates, and the composition 
of each extract. 

Analysis No. 10. 





1st Percolate, 10 : 1. 


2nd Percolate, 


5 :1. 


3rd Percolate, 


5:1. 










Total Extract, 7 "9 


Total Extract, 


674 


Total Extract, 


0-37 










per cent, of Seeds. 


per cent, of Seeds. 


per cent, of Seeds. 








Impure strophanthin, 


68-16 


27-44 




25-67 




pel 


cent. 


of extract. 


Mucilage, 


12-27 


42-28 




52-7 






)> 


>) 


Resin, 


13-79 
94-22 


23-36 




14-18 






3) 


» 




9308 


92-12 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



999 



The first percolate of 10 of spirit to 1 of seeds, therefore, yielded 7*9 per cent, of the 
8 "94 per cent, of total alcohol extract; and this 7 '9 per cent, contained a much larger 
percentage of strophanthin than either of the subsequent percolates. 

Analysis No. 11. 

Alcohol Extract of Analysis No. 3 (p. 994). — 500 grains of seeds yielded 54*93 
grains, or 10*98 per cent., of alcohol extract — 



Impure strophanthin, 36-516 grains, . 

Mucilage, 7 "46 grains, 

Resin, 7 -14 grains, .... 



= 66*479 per cent, of alcohol extract. 
= 13-6 
= 13-01 



93089 



The seeds had been extracted by three successive percolations with rectified spirit. 
In the first and second percolations, 4 of spirit to 1 of seeds was used, and in the 
third 10 of spirit to 1 of seeds. The total alcohol extract of each percolate, and the 
quantity of strophanthin, mucilage, and resin in it are stated below. 



Analysis No. 12. 



Impure strophanthin, 

Mucilage, 

Resin, . 



1st Percolate, 4:1. 

Total Alcohol Extract, 

42-43 grains = 8 -486 

per cent, of Seeds. 

78-34 

(33-236 grains) 

3-37 

(1*42 grain) 

12-39 

(4 - 9 grains) 



2nd Percolate, 4 : 1. 
Total Alcohol Extract, 
5'1 grains = 1-02 
per cent, of Seeds. 

31-568 

(1'61 grain) 

48-647 
(2-48 grains) 

12-549 
(0'64 grain) 



3rd Percolate, 10 : 1. 

Total Alcohol Extract, 

7 "4 grain8 = l - 48 

per cent, of Seeds. 

22-567 
(1-67 grain) 

48-4 
(3 '56 grains) 

21-621 
(1-6 grain) 



per cent, of extract. 



Of the 10*98 per cent, of alcoholic extract, 8*48 per cent, was, therefore, obtained by 
the first four ounces of percolate, and only 2*5 per cent, by the subsequent fourteen 
ounces. The extract from the first percolate was also much richer in active principle 
than the extract from subsequent percolates. 

It appears from the above analyses that, by the process of percolation, nearly all the 
active principle is extracted by the first small quantity of spirit, and that this percolate 
yields an extract consisting chiefly of active principle. Further percolates contain only 
small quantities of the active principle, even although they may be of decidedly bitter taste ; 
but they contain much mucilage, resin, and other undetermined substances. It is also 
to be noted that the extract obtained from the first percolate with a moderate quantity of 
rectified spirit differs from the extracts obtained from further percolates, not only in chemical 
composition, but also in physical characters. After having been dried by spontaneous 
evaporation and by exposure in vacuo over sulphuric acid, both extracts may be opaque, 
brittle, and only slightly coloured, although the extract from the first percolate is less 
coloured than those from subsequent percolates ; but while the former retains for an 
indefinite time the appearance and physical characters it had acquired on becoming dry, 



1000 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

the latter become much darker in colour, they lose their opacity and brittleness, and 
acquire a plastic amorphous character and a dark reddish-brown colour. These changes 
occur independently of exposure, as they have been observed with extracts protected 
from the effects of exposure by being placed as soon as dried in well-stoppered bottles. 

The impure strophanthin, precipitated by ether from an alcoholic solution of extract, is 
also a much purer substance when it is derived from the first percolate than when it is 
derived from subsequent percolates. In the former case, it is pale, brittle, crystalline, and 
opaque, and it retains these characters for an indefinite period ; while in the latter case, it 
is, from the first, translucent and of a brownish-yellow colour, and if dried so as to 
admit of being reduced to a powder, it soon afterwards becomes an adherent homogeneous 
mass of dark colour. 

Analyses of the Testa and of the Cotyledons and Embryos of the Seeds. 

The next analyses were made in order to ascertain the quantity of each of the above 
ingredients present in the testa and in the combined cotyledons and embryos, respectively, 
and especially to ascertain whether the former or the latter contains the largest quantity 
of active principle. When the testa was carefully separated from the rest of the seeds 
it was found, in 119 "48 grains of seeds, that the testa weighed 52*6 grains, or 44 per cent., 
and the combined cotyledons and embryos, 66*88 grains, or 55*97 per cent., of the seeds. 

Analysis No. 13. 

52*6 grains of testa yielded — 

Anhydrous ether extract (28 : 1) 9-58 grains = 18*212 per cent, of testa, or 8 - 016 per cent, of seeds. 
Rectified spirit extract (20 : 1) 4-58 grains = 8-707 „ „ or 4-873 „ „ 

66*75 grains of cotyledons and embryos yielded — 

Anhydrous ether extract (26 : 1) 31 - 15 grains = 46 - 666 per cent, of cotyledons and embryos, or 26-118 

per cent, of seeds. 
Rectified spirit extract (20:1) 4-865 grains = 7*288 per cent, of cotyledons and embryos, or 4 - 07 

per cent, of seeds. „ 

The testa therefore yielded a much smaller quantity of ether extract, but a somewhat 
larger quantity of spirit extract, than the combined cotyledons and embryos. The ether 
extract derived from the testa was, however, a very different substance from that derived 
from the cotyledons and embryos. The former was of a dark greenish-brown colour, 
and not quite clear ; the latter was of a very pale yellow colour, with a tinge of green, 
and at a temperature of 60° F., the greater part of it was perfectly clear and translucent, 
there being only a small whitish sediment. 

The alcohol extracts also possessed marked differences in character and composition. 
That from the testa, when perfectly dry, was yellowish-brown in colour, semi-translucent, 
only partly brittle, and faintly aromatic ; but in a short time, even in a stoppered bottle, 
it became dark reddish-brown, adhesive, and soft. The alcohol extract from the coty- 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1001 

ledons and embryos, on the other hand, was opaque, pale yellowish-white, brittle, and 
inodorous ; and it retained these characters without change for several months. The 
differences in composition are stated below. 

Analysis No. 14. 

Alcoholic extract of testa, 4*58 grains, yielded — 

Impure strophanthin, 2 - 7 grains = 58'95 per cent, of extract, or 5*13 per cent, of testa. 

Mucilage, 0'875 grain = 19-104 „ „ 1-663 „ 

Resin, 0"94 grain =20-545 „ „ 1-663 „ „ 

Alcoholic extract of cotyledons and embryos, 4*865 grains, yielded — 

Impure strophanthin, 3765 grains = 77 - 4 per cent, of extract, or 5-65 of cotyledons and embryos. 

Mucilage, 0-48 grain = 9866 „ „ 0-719 

Resin, 0-44 grain = 9-044 „ „ 067 „ 

On comparing the above analyses, it is seen that the alcoholic extract of the testa 
contains less active principle and much more mucilage and resin than the alcoholic 
extract of the cotyledons and embryos. When derived from the testa, each of these 
products is also much more coloured than when derived from the cotyledons and embryos. 
The alcoholic extract of the seeds, therefore, obtains most of its colouring matter, muci- 
lage and resin from the testa, and most of its strophanthin and oil from the cotyledons 
and embryos. 

Reactions of the Alcoholic Extract. 

The action of a considerable number of reagents has been tested upon both the dry 
extract and a watery solution of it. 

Dry Extract. 

1. Moistened with strong sulphuric acid, it first became pale yellow, then brown, and 
in a few seconds emerald-green. In about a minute the green was almost completely 
displaced by brownish-black, and in about an hour dark green became the predominating 
colour, but it passed in another hour into greyish-green. 

When, after the addition of strong sulphuric acid, the extract was placed in a chamber 
heated to 105° F., and the temperature was gradually raised to 120° F., the green colour- 
soon became much intensified, and in about an hour and a half it passed into a dirty 
green, and ultimately into a nondescript grey, through which numerous black particles 
were diffused. 

2. With dilute sulphuric acid (10 or 2 per cent.) no material colour change was pro- 
duced within several hours, provided the extract were originally only a slightly coloured 
one. When the solution was then heated to 120° F., it gradually became light green, 
dark green, bluish-green, deep blue, violet-blue, deep violet, and ultimately violet-black 
and brownish-grey. 

The final coloured products of 1 and 2 are insoluble in water. 



1002 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

3. Strong nitric acid (Ph. Brit. ) produced a pale brown solution. 

4. Dilute nitric acid (10 per cent.) slowly dissolved the extract, forming a pale yellow 
solution. 

When this solution was heated between 115° and 130° F., it gradually became 
faintly red, then blue appeared at the margins, and the centre became canary-yellow, 
then pinkish streaks extended across the yellow centre, and, finally, the whole became 
permanently of a gamboge-yellow colour. 

5. Strong hydrochloric acid (Ph. Brit.) produced a yellowish solution. 

6. Dilute hydrochloric acid (10 per cent.) also produced a yellowish solution. 

When this solution was heated between 115° and 130° F., it became greenish- 
yellow, brownish-green with faint blue patches, deep violet, and, finally, very dark 
green. 

7. Acetic acid (Ph. Brit.) produced a pale brownish solution. 

8. Iodic acid produced a pale brownish solution, in which, however, no blue colour 
was developed by starch. 

9. Strong snlphnric acid and bichromate of potassium produced a greenish-brown 
colour. 

10. No material change was caused by strong sulphuric acid, rectified spirit, and neutral 
solution of ferric chloride ; nor by sulphuric acid and bromine water. 

11. Solution of potash, soda, or ammonia produced a bright yellow solution, but the 
yellow colour immediately disappeared on the addition of dilute sulphuric, hydrochloric, 
or acetic acid. When the alkaline yellow solution was boiled, it evolved a methylamine 
odour and alkaline fumes, and in a short time it became reddish-brown in colour, and 
lost much of its bitterness. 

12. Phospho-molybdic acid produced a green colour, which immediately changed to blue 
on the addition of an alkali. 

Solution of Extract in Water (2 per cent.). 

1. Acetate of lead produced a faintly yellow flocculent precipitate. 

2. Subacetate of lead produced an abundant yellowish flocculent precipitate. 

After the lead precipitates in 1 and 2 had subsided, the supernatent fluid was 
nearly colourless and intensely bitter. 

3. Solution of ferric chloride (Ph. Br.) caused a greenish-yellow colour, and afterwards 
a slight precipitate. 

4. Nitrate of silver produced a faint opalescence, which afterwards became a dark 
precipitate. 

5. Mercurous nitrate produced a white cloudiness, which afterwards subsided as a 
slight grey sediment. 

6. Cupric sulphate produced a slight haziness, which, on subsidence, left a pale green 
fluid. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1003 

7. Platinic chloride failed to produce any change within several hours, but on the 
following day a slight brownish opalescence had occurred. 

8. Phospho-molybdic acid produced a very pale greenish-yellow precipitate, permanent 
only with a considerable quantity of reagent. When the precipitate had subsided, the 
supernatant fluid was seen to be emerald-green ; and the precipitate dissolved on boiling, 
and reappeared on cooling. 

9. Molybdate of ammonium produced a faint yellow tint, and, after several hours, a 
considerable yellowish-white precipitate, the supernatant fluid continuing to be yellow. 
The precipitate dissolved on boiling, and appeared again on cooling. 

10. Tannic acid produced a copious white precipitate. 

11. Solution of potash, soda, ammonia, lime, and baryta, and of carbonate of potash and 
carbonate of soda, each produced a bright orange-yellow colour. Carbonate of ammonium, 
carbonate of baryta, and bicarbonate of potash produced a less marked yellow. In each case, 
the yellow colour was immediately discharged by dilute acetic acid. The alkaline yellow 
fluids did not reduce Fehling's solution when boiled with it. 

12. Sulphuric acid (10 per cent.), dilute hydrochloric acid (Ph. Br.), dilute nitric acid 
(Ph. Br.), and dilute phosphoric acid (Ph. Br.) each rendered the solution paler, and slowly 
produced a slight flocculence, which disappeared in great part on boiling. When 
afterwards neutralised and tested with Fehling's solution, a well-marked reduction 
occurred. 

13. Dilute acetic acid (Ph. Br.) produced no obvious change; and after boiling for a 
few seconds, and neutralising with sodium carbonate, only a slight reduction of Fehling's 
solution was obtained. 

No obvious change was produced by picric acid, carbonateof b aryta, phosphate of sodium, 
chloride of gold, mercuric chloride, potassio-mercuric iodide, metatungstate of sodium, tri-iodide of 
potassium, potassio-bismuthic iodide, nor potassio-cadmic iodide. 

Absence of any Alkaloid from the Extract. 

The failure, already described, of many reagents for alkaloids to produce change in the 
watery solution of the extract, although it is naturally acid in reaction, affords sufficient 
evidence of the absence from the seeds of any alkaloidal principle. 

In addition to this negative evidence, ten grains of the extract were treated according to 
Stas' method for separating alkaloids, ether and chloroform being used as the separating 
solvents; but the result was also entirely negative, only 0'035 grain of total product 
( = 0"35 per cent.) having been obtained, which with sulphuric acid and heat gave 
merely colour changes characteristic of strophanthin. 

At the same time, the extract contains nitrogen in small quantity, but this is by no 
means remarkable when its composition is borne in recollection. 

Further, when the extract is made alkaline by solution of potash and then heated, 
alkaline vapours, having a distinctly ammoniacal or, rather, methylamine odour, are 
evolved. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 N 



1004 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

Some interest is attached to the circumstance that when the extract has been in con- 
tact with a dilute acid for a short time, slight and inconclusive alkaloidal reactions may- 
be obtained with it. Thus, in a 2 per cent, watery solution, acidulated with weak 
sulphuric acid, potassio-mercuric iodide, platinic chloride, auric chloride, and tri-iodide 
of potassium, each produced a slight haze, becoming in a few hours a faint precipitate, 
and metatungstate of sodium produced in a few minutes a scanty, but well-marked 
precipitate. The solution was originally free from glucose, but was found to contain it 
soon after the addition of the acid, and before the above reactions were obtained. 

Presence of a Glucoside in the Extract. 

The reduction of Fehling's reagent by solutions of the extract in dilute acids having 
indicated the presence of glucose in these solutions, it became of importance to determine 
if this glucose is usually and normally present in the extract, or is produced in it by the 
decomposition of one or more of its constituents. 

Some alcoholic extract, prepared by percolating the seeds with ethyl ether and then 
with rectified spirit, was dissolved in distilled water so as to constitute a 2 per cent, 
solution. When heated with Fehling's reagent it failed to give any evidence of reduc- 
tion. A portion of the same solution of extract was then acidified with sulphuric acid, 
and left at the ordinary temperature. After three days, the now slightly turbid solution 
was filtered, and after having been neutralised with carbonate of sodium it also was 
tested with Fehling's solution, when it immediately produced a copious reduction. 

Evidence was thus obtained in an extract originally free from glucose, of a decom- 
position having been caused by dilute acid, of which one of the products is glucose, and 
the presence of a glucoside in the extract was accordingly indicated. 

Similar evidence was also obtained in one of the dark extracts derived from late per- 
colates of the seeds. When dissolved in water, it failed to reduce Fehling's solution, but 
it did so after it had been acidulated with weak sulphuric acid. 

The production of this decomposition in the cold by the action of dilute acids was 
further examined. 

It was found that when a 3 or 4 per cent, solution of alcoholic extract in water is 
acidified with sulphuric acid, so that the acid is present as a 0'3 to 2 per cent, solution, 
the mixture in a short time becomes turbid, an apparently amorphous deposit forms 
in it, and in from two to four days the solution becomes clear and less coloured, and 
small crystalline tufts appear at the bottom and sides of the vessel, which increase in 
size until a considerable crystallisation has been produced. To this crystalline substance 
I have given the name Strophanthidin. On examining the solution in which the crystals 
have appeared, it is now found to contain much glucose. 

When a minute quantity of the extract dissolved in a drop of water is placed on a 
microscope slide provided with a shallow cup, and a drop of 2 per cent, sulphuric acid is 
added to it before the cover-glass has been applied, in one or two days a large number of 
small and translucent globular bodies make their appearance, and in three or four days a 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1005 

beautiful crystallisation of strophanthidin may be observed in the solution. The crystals 
have for the most part the appearance represented in Plate VII. fig. 10, but in portions of 
the field, where only a thin layer of fluid is interposed between the cover-glass and the 
slide, their form is modified to that of groups of long and slender radiating needles, and 
of fan-shaped crystalline plates. 

A well-defined crystallisation produced in such circumstances in a solution of a phar- 
macologically active substance, is of so rare occurrence that it may usefully be applied as 
a test for strophanthus extract. It would probably, also, be an easy matter to devise a 
quantitative test for all strophanthus preparations, depending on the amount of crystal- 
line strophanthidin produced in this reaction. 

If a watery solution of the extract be acidified, and, after a short time, shaken with 
chloroform or amyl alcohol, the separated chloroform or amyl alcohol yields on evapora- 
tion a crystalline substance. It is, accordingly, an easy matter to obtain a well-defined 
crystalline product from the extract; but it will, at the same time, be found that the 
original solution now contains glucose, and the crystalline substance thus obtained is not 
therefore strophanthin, but strophanthidin, one of the products of its decomposition. 

Notwithstanding the circumstance that dilute acids so readily decompose the gluco- 
side present in the extract, this decomposition does not appear to occur spontaneously in 
a watery solution of the extract, although its reaction is decidedly acid. In such a solu- 
tion, a fungous growth makes its appearance in a short time ; but even in a solution made 
more than two months previously and containing an abundant fungous growth, no glucose 
could be detected by Fehling's reagent. At this time, also, the solution appears to be as 
intensely bitter as when it was first prepared. When, however, the naturally acid solution 
of the extract in water is boiled for a short time, a small quantity of glucose is produced ; 
but the decomposition is so slight that no formation of crystalline strophanthidin can be 
observed. (See Table X. Analysis No. 15.) 

On the other hand, the glucoside in the extract is quickly and completely decom- 
posed by the addition of many acids ; and weak solutions of several acids may, even 
at the ordinary temperature, produce this decomposition sufficiently to cause crystalline 
strophanthidin to appear in the solution. 

The following experiment illustrates the action in the cold of a weak solution of 
sulphuric acid : — 

A 5 per cent, solution of extract in water was acidulated with sulphuric acid so as to 
produce a 0"4 per cent, solution of acid. The solution very soon became slightly turbid; 
in two days, the turbidity had greatly increased; in four days, a few small crystalline 
rosettes had appeared at the bottom of the solution, which was now less turbid ; and in 
five days, there was a considerable pale brownish-yellow incrustation at the bottom and 
sides of the vessel, consisting chiefly of round groups of lancet-shaped crystals, while the 
fluid was now only faintly turbid, and much less coloured. The crystals, which could 
not be removed from the vessel without some loss, when washed and dried, weighed 18*3 
per cent, of the extract used. The filtered solution, after having been neutralised, was 



1006 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

found, on estimation with Fehling's reagent, to contain 23'4 per cent, of glucose. (Table 
X. Analysis No. 16.) 

In another experiment with the same strength of solution of extract and of sulphuric 
acid, but in which the acidulated solution was at once boiled for half an hour, an abundant 
formation of large and only slightly coloured crystals occurred while the solution was 
being raised to the boiling point, and before the temperature of 180° F. had been attained; 
and, at the same time, a peculiar odour, like that of cooked raisins, was developed. The 
crystals became broken and more deeply coloured by the boiling ; but still, when dried, 
they weighed 27 '4 per cent, of the extract. The glucose produced amounted to 27 '9 per 
cent. (Table X. Analysis No. 17.) 

In an experiment in which 0*32 per cent, of sulphuric acid was used, on raising the 
temperature to 170° F., the solution became opalescent ; but after it had cooled, only an 
amorphous sediment, amounting to 6*3 per cent, was deposited. When, however, the 
filtered solution was made slightly alkaline with sodium carbonate, a precipitate, consisting 
of minute and perfectly formed crystals, was thrown down, which amounted to 13 '7 per 
cent, of extract. 21 per cent, of glucose was produced. (Table X. Analysis No. 20.) 

In another experiment, where all the conditions were the same as in the preceding 
one, except that the percentage of sulphuric acid was 1*6 instead of 0*32, no crystalline 
strophanthidin was produced, but merely an amorphous brown substance, which weighed 
9 per cent. The quantity of glucose formed was exactly the same as in the preceding 
experiment, namely. 21 per cent. (Table X. Analysis No. 21.) 

The production in the cold as well as at an elevated temperature of crystalline strophan- 
thidin and glucose was observed with other acids, and with different degrees of acidity. 
In many of the experiments, the acidulated solution was left at the ordinary temperature 
for several days, and then decanted from any crystals that had formed ; and the decanted 
solution, after having been filtered, was divided into two equal parts, in one of which the 
glucose was at once estimated, while in the other this estimation was not made until the 
solution had been boiled for half an hour. By this plan, the production or non-production 
of crystalline strophanthidin and of glucose in the cold, and of glucose at a temperature 
of 212° F., and the quantity of each substance produced in these conditions could be 
ascertained. Even when made with the same acid, the various experiments are not, how- 
ever, always comparable, as the percentage of acid and of extract in the solutions, the 
duration of contact, the temperature to which the solutions was subjected, and even the 
extracts used, were not the same, but, indeed, were intentionally varied. 

In estimating the quantity of glucose by Fehling's reagent, a difficulty was encoun- 
tered, due to the absence of a sharp indication of the point when the whole of the reagent 
had been reduced. The disappearance of the blue colour, on which reliance generally is 
placed, is masked by the production of a greenish-blue, which, on further additions of the 
glucose solution, gradually passes into distinct green, yellowish-green, yellow, and reddish- 
yellow. Control experiments appeared to show that complete reduction of Fehling's reagent 
is not produced until a reddish -yellow colour has appeared, but the shades of colour pass 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



1007 



Table X. — Summary of Analyses in which Extract of Strophanthus was decomposed by Acids. 







Per- 












to 


Quantity 
of Extract 

in 
Grammes. 


centage 

of 

Extract 

in the 

Solution. 


Acid and 
its Per- 
centage. 


Strophanthidin 

produced in 

the Cold. 


Glucose 

produced 

in the 

Cold. 


Strophanthidin produced 
after Heating. 


Glucose pro- 
duced after 
Heating. 


15 


0-25 


10% 


No added acid. 


None. 


None. 


No appreciable production. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
about 1 %. 


16 


0-25 


5% 


Sulphuric acid, 
0-4%. 


In five days, 18*3 
% of crystalline 
strophanthidin. 


23-4% 




... 


17 


25 


5% 


Do., 0-4%. 


... 




After boiling for half an hour, 27 '4 % 
of crystalline, brownish-yellow stro- 
phanthidin. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
27-9%. 


18 


1-0 


2-5% 


Do., 1 %. 






After boiling for four hours, 31 "6 % of 
yellowish-brown amorphous deposit. 


After boiling for 
four hours, 21 "3 % 
by Fehling's re- 
agent, 22-4 % by 
fermentation. 


19 


0-5 


3-4% 


Do., 1-6 %. 


In five days, 30 '45 
% of yellowish- 
brown crystal- 
line strophanthi- 
din. 


26% 


After boiling one half of the filtered 
solution for half an hour, only a 
little brown amorphous substance. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 

25%. 


20 


0-25 


3-2% 


Do., 32%. 




After heating to 170°, 6"3 % of brown 


After heating to 














amorphous substance ; on rendering 


170°, 21 %. 














the cold filtered solution alkaline, 
















13'73 %of crystalline strophanthidin. 




21 


0-25 


3-2% 


Do., 1-6%. 






After heating to 170°, 9 % of amor- 
phous brown substance. 


After heating to 
170°, 21 %. 


22 


25 


4% 


Do., 2%. 


In three days, 27 - 21 
% of brownish- 
yellow crystal- 
line strophanthi- 
din. 


20% 


After boiling one half of the filtered 
solution for half an hour, a slight 
amorphous deposit. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
20-8 %. 


23 


0-25 


4% 


Do., 2%. 


In five days, 207 
% of crystal- 
line strophanthi- 
din. 


20-5% 






24 


0-25 


1% 


Hydrochloric 
acid, 1 %. 






After heating for half an hour between 
98° and 100° F., no crystallisation. 


After heating for 
half an hour be- 
tween 98° and 
100° F., 5-5%. 


25 


0-5 


4% 


Do., 0-1 %. 


In six days, a 


24-5% 


After heating one half of the filtered 


After boiling for 










slight non-crys- 


(?) 


solution between 120° and 140° F. 


half an hour, 










talline deposit. 




for half an hour, 16 - 32 % of crystal- 
line strophanthidin. The filtrate 
boiled for half an hour, deposited a 
further small quantity of crystalline 
strophanthidin. 


257 %. 


26 


0-5 


5% 


Nitric acid, 


In five days, 29"9 % 


24% 


After boiling one half of the filtered 


After boiling for 








2%. 


of crystalline stro- 
phanthidin. 




solution for half an hour, 1*5 % 
of crystalline strophanthidin. 


half an hour, 

27-2%. 


27 


5 


5% 


Phosphoric 


In five days, 6 % 


12-8% 


After boiling one half of the filtered 


After boiling for 








acid, 2 %. 


of crystalline stro- 
phanthidin. 




solution for half an hour, 26 - 42 % of 
crystalline strophanthidin. 


half an hour, 
22%. 


28 


0-5 


5% 


Acetic acid, 


In six days, only a 


2% 


After boiling one half of the filtered 


After boiling for 








2%. 


slight amorphous 
deposit. 




solution for half an hour, 12 "9 % of 
crystalline strophanthidin. 


half an hour, 
15-34%. 


29 


0-25 


2-5% 


Oxalic acid, 


In five days, a 


16% 


After boiling one half of the fitered 


After boiling for 








2%. 


slight amorphous 
deposit. 




solution for half an hour, 10 "4 % of 
crystalline strophanthidin. 


half an hour, 
19-4 %. 


30 


0-25 


2-5% 


Hydrocyanic 


In five days, a very 


Glucose 


After boiling one half of the filtered 


After boiling for 








acid, 2 %. 


slight amorphous 


not suffi- 


solution for half an hour, only a 


half an hour, 










deposit. 


cient to 
be esti- 
mated. 


minute, apparently amorphous de- 
posit. 


3%. 



1008 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

so gradually into each other that accurate determinations by this method are extremely 
difficult. 

Exact estimations of the quantity of strophanthidin produced in the experiments were 
not attempted. If unattached to the vessel in which the decomposition had been effected, 
the strophanthidin crystals were collected as carefully as possible by filtration, and if 
they adhered to the vessel they were removed by scraping ; but as the crystals are some- 
what soluble in water, while the quantity of water used in the experiments varied 
considerably, some loss, which was not the same in each experiment, undoubtedly occurred. 

In fact, the object of the experiments was to determine the qualitative rather than 
the quantitative changes produced in the extract by the influence of acids, and above all 
to demonstrate clearly that glucose and strophanthidin are produced, and that the latter 
substance can with great facility be obtained in a crystalline form. 

A summary of the experiments is given in Table X., p. 1007. 

It has thus been shown (a) that the extract contains a glucoside, which is readily de- 
composed by weak solutions of acids so as to produce glucose, and the crystalline body, 
strophanthidin; (b) that glucose is produced in the extract by sulphuric, hydrochloric, nitric, 
phosphoric, acetic, and oxalic acids, both in the cold and at an elevated temperature, but 
by two per cent, hydrocyanic acid only at an elevated temperature ; (c) that crystalline 
strophanthidin is produced in the cold by sulphuric, nitric, and phosphoric acids, but as 
only very weak solutions of hydrochloric acid were used, it cannot be stated that this acid 
is unable in the cold also to produce crystalline strophanthidin ; and (d) that crystalline 
strophanthidin is produced at an elevated temperature by sulphuric, hydrochloric, nitric, 
phosphoric, acetic, and oxalic acids. 

It may be added that while carbonic acid fails to decompose the glucoside, it is decom- 
posed with the formation of crystalline strophanthidin and of glucose, by sulphuretted 
hydrogen. 

The crystalline form assumed by strophanthidin was found to vary considerably. 
When produced in the cold, the strophanthidin was usually in the form of rosettes or 
nodules, consisting of lancet-shaped crystals (see Plate VII. fig. 10); but in the experiments 
where an elevated temperature was employed, beautiful, long and slender acicular 
needles, perfect minute prisms, and prisms grouped in stellar arrangements were also 
produced. In the experiments at an elevated temperature with sulphuric acid, a brown 
amorphous substance, and no crystalline strophanthidin, appeared when the acid was of 
greater strength than 0*4 per cent.; but in the cold, even 2 per cent, sulphuric acid caused 
the formation of crystalline strophanthidin. 

Strophanthin. 

Preparation. — The well-defined crystals produced during the evaporation of non- 
acidulated watery solutions of the extract (pp. 996 and 997) consist, no doubt, of the 
active principle, strophanthin. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1009 

It is, however, extremely difficult to separate the crystals from adhering impurities 
by the use of any solvents ; and even when that is accomplished, the great solubility of 
strophanthin in water and in rectified spirit, entails much loss, if separation by repeated 
crystallisation be attempted. The crystalline products obtained when ether is added to a 
very dilute alcoholic solution of the extract, and when ether is added to a strong solution 
of the alcoholic extract in water, also both represent nearly pure forms of strophanthin ; but, 
on several times repeating each process, it was found that sometimes only did it succeed 
in yielding a crystalline product, while, frequently, it failed to do so. Nice adjustments, 
extremely difficult to determine, are obviously required of the proportional quantities of 
active principle, water, alcohol and ether, and of active principle, water and ether, 
respectively, in order to ensure the separation of the active principle in the form of 
colourless crystals. 

It was therefore found necessary to devise some other process. In the first place, at 
an early stage in the research, the removal of impurities and the isolation of the active 
principle by subacetate of lead was attempted ; as it had been found that after the removal 
of the copious precipitate formed in solutions of the extract by subacetate of lead an 
intensely bitter, clear, and only slightly coloured nitrate, of great pharmacological activity, 
was obtained. When, however, sulphuretted hydrogen was passed through this filtrate, 
in order to precipitate lead, the active principle was necessarily subjected to the action 
both of sulphuretted hydrogen and of free acetic acid; and accordingly it was decomposed, 
glucose appeared in the solution, and strophanthidin crystallised out in great abundance. 
As the extract obtained by small quantities of rectified spirit from the seeds previously 
percolated with ether, appeared to consist chiefly of active principle, the removal of the 
inconsiderable quantity of impurity present in it was attempted by treatment with pure 
animal charcoal ; but this process also proved unsatisfactory both in the quantity and 
quality of the product obtained. 

After several other attempts, the following was adopted as a tolerably satisfactory, 
though, no doubt at the same time laborious, process for separating the active principle 
in a pure form. 

The active principle was precipitated by a solution of tannin from a strong solution 
of the extract in water ; the well-washed tannate was thoroughly mixed with recently 
precipitated, carefully washed, and moist oxide of lead, which was added in the quantity 
calculated to be necessary for the conversion of the tannin into tannate of lead ; the 
mixture was digested for several days at a low temperature; and, after it had been dried, 
it was thoroughly exhausted with rectified spirit, and occasionally with proof spirit. If 
the alcoholic solution still contained any tannin, as it usually did, it was evaporated to a 
syrupy consistence, and again treated as above with a smaller quantity of oxide of lead. 
It was frequently necessary to adopt a third such treatment before every trace of tannin 
had been removed. The product was now dissolved in weak alcohol, and, if necessary, 
decanted and filtered from sediment; and through the clear and usually almost colourless 
solution, a gentle stream of well-washed carbonic acid was passed for two or three days, 



1010 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

in order to remove traces of lead. The solution was then evaporated to dryness, and the 
residue dissolved in rectified spirit, and, after filtration, ether was added to the solution 
to precipitate the active principle. The precipitate was dissolved in absolute alcohol, which 
usually left a further slight sediment, and the clear alcoholic solution was finally dried by 
spontaneous evaporation, and by being placed in a partial vacuum over sulphuric acid. 

By this process, about 65 per cent, of the active principle, strophanthin, was usually 
obtained from the extract. This quantity, undoubtedly, does not represent the whole of 
the active principle present in the extract ; but the result otherwise is satisfactory, in so 
far as the quality of the product is concerned. 

Characters. — Strophanthin thus obtained is a colourless, opaque, and brittle sub- 
stance, having an appearance suggestive of a crystalline body, but exhibiting no crystals 
to the naked eye. Under the microscope, however, it is found to consist of minute 
irregular crystalline plates, whose appearance is illustrated in Plate VII. fig. 9. 

When ether is added to very dilute alcoholic solutions of it, and the faintly turbid 
mixture is put aside in a stoppered bottle for a few days, beautiful stellar groups of 
colourless and transparent crystals frequently form on the sides and at the bottom of 
the bottle. Some of these groups, as seen with a lens magnifying about six times, have 
been represented in Plate VII. fig. 7. 

Strophanthin is very freely soluble in water and in rectified spirit, losing its opacity 
when a very small quantity of either solvent is added to it, and becoming a viscous, 
clear, and faintly yellow solution on further minute additions. It is soluble in 55 parts 
of absolute alcohol (sp. gr. 796), in 300 parts of acetone, and in 1000 parts of amyl 
alcohol (sp. gr. *820). It is almost insoluble in chloroform (sp. gr. 1'497), in absolute 
(sp. gr. '723) and common (sp. gr. 730) ethyl ether, in petroleum ether boiling below 
120° F., and in bisulphide of carbon.* Glycerine (sp. gr. 1*26) dissolves it freely; but 
when small quantities are placed in strophanthus oil and in olive oil, respectively, they 
remain unchanged for several months, although, afterwards, the particles appear to dis- 
solve very slowly. 

Solutions in rectified spirit and in amyl alcohol are precipitated by the addition of 
chloroform, absolute or common ethyl ether, petroleum ether, and bisulphide of carbon. 
A solution in absolute alcohol is precipitated by ethyl and by petroleum ether, and is 
rendered slightly turbid by bisulphide of carbon ; but neither chloroform nor acetone 
produce any change in the appearance of the solution. A solution in acetone is precipi- 
tated by ethyl ether, petroleum ether, chloroform, and bisulphide of carbon, but not by 
absolute alcohol nor by amyl alcohol. 

Strophanthin is intensely bitter. When dissolved in distilled water, the bitterness is 
slightly appreciable in a solution of 1 part in 300,000. Its solution in water or rectified 
spirit is acid in reaction. When a dilute solution in water is shaken, a persistent froth 
is produced. Solutions in ordinary or in distilled water soon lose their perfect trans- 

* In the experiments that were made, chloroform dissolved 1 part in 10,000, and absolute and common ethyl ether, 
petroleum ether, and bisulphide of carbon about 1 part in 20,000. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1011 

lucency by the growth of a fungus in them ; but, notwithstanding this circumstance, as 
has already been stated, even after several months, no glucose appears in the solutions, 
and they apparently retain their original bitterness and pharmacological activity. 

Strophanthin melts at a temperature of 343° F. Below this temperature, at about 
295° F., it acquires a faintly yellow colour, which becomes yellowish-brown at the 
melting point. When the temperature is further raised, it evolves fumes having at 
first a caramel and then a disagreeable empyreumatic odour, becomes charred, and finally 
disappears without almost any residue. 

When heated in a test-tube with soda lime, and when tested by Lassaigne's cyanogen 
process, it was found to contain no nitrogen. 

Ultimate Analysis — In order to determine its percentage composition, several com- 
bustions were made, of which the three following agree closely in their results : — 

Analysis No. 31. — 0*3 gramme, yielded C0 2 , 0*610 = 55*45 per cent. C. 

H 2 0, 0'204 = 7*55 per cent. H. 
Analysis No. 32. — 0*1789 gramme, yielded C0 2 , 0*3635 = 55*41 per cent. C. 

„ H 2 0, 0*1222= 7*58 per cent. H. 
Analysis No. 33. — 0*1893 gramme, yielded C0 2 , 0*3849 = 55'45 per cent. C. 

„ H 2 0, 0*1288= 7*56 per cent. H. 

These percentages correspond with the formula C 16 H 26 8 . 





Found (average of above 
three analyses). 


Calculated for 


Carbon, 


55*43 


55*49 per cent. 


Hydrogen, 


7*56 


7*51 „ 


Oxygen (by subtraction), 


37*01 


37*0 



C 16 H 26 8 may, therefore, provisionally be adopted as the formula of strophanthin, until 
at any rate more complete knowledge has been obtained of its constitution. 

Reactions. 

When various reagents were applied to strophanthin in the dry state, and also in 
2 per cent, solution, the results were as follows : — 

Dry Strophanthin. 

1. When a minute quantity, in the form of powder, was moistened with a drop of 
strong sulphuric acid, a bright green colour was immediately produced, which in a few 
seconds became greenish-yellow, and then brown at the centre with green at the edges ; 
in twenty minutes, the whole was brownish-green; in a few minutes afterwards, it was 
grey, with a greenish tint ; and in the course of an hour or two, dirty brown, without 
any green. 

When strophanthin moistened with strong sulphuric acid was heated to between 110° 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 



1012 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

and 120° F., the green colour first produced soon became dark olive, changing to very 
dark brown, with green at the parts which had dried, then to violet and dark violet-blue, 
aud, finally, to black with a violet tint. 

2. With 10 per cent, sulphuric acid a nearly colourless solution was produced, which 
remained unchanged in appearance for several hours. 

When heated between 110° and 120° F. with 10 per cent, sulphuric acid, it soon 
became light green, grass green, dark green, deep bluish-green, deep greenish-violet, 
very dark violet, and in about two hours, black with a violet tint. When allowed to 
cool, the last colour remained for more than twelve hours. 

These colour changes were quite distinctly obtained with even the j^, of a grain of 
strophanthin. 

3. Strong nitric acid, in the cold, produced a pale brown solution. 

4. Dilute nitric acid (10 per cent.) merely dissolved strophanthin, without obvious 
change of colour. 

When heated between 115° and 130° F. with 10 per cent, nitric acid, a violet colour 
was first developed, in which blue streaks appeared; the whole then became violet for a 
few minutes, then yellow appeared at the margins, the violet gave place to yellowish- 
brown, and, finally, in about forty minutes, the whole became gamboge-yellow, and 
remained this colour for several hours. 

5. Strong hydrochloric acid dissolved strophanthin, forming a pale j^ellow solution, 
which afterwards became brownish-yellow. 

6. Dilute hydrochloric acid (10 per cent.) dissolved it, and produced a colourless 
solution. 

When heated between 115° and 130° F., changes were very slowly produced; in 
about twenty minutes, a yellow colour appeared, which, however, soon passed into green, 
and then into blue (Turnbull's), and the last colour remained for several hours. 

7. Strong sulphuric acid and bichromate of potassium, in the cold, produced successively 
green, orange-brown, dark brown with green at the edges, and emerald-green. When 
now heated to between 115° and 120°, the green slowly became bluish-violet. 

8. When to a minute particle of strophanthin there was added a small drop of 
distilled water and also of dilute solution of ferric chloride, and then a drop of strong 
sulphuric acid, a deep yellow colour appeared, which changed to pink. On mixing the 
whole with a glass rod the pink disappeared. 

9. Solution of phospho-molybdic acid developed rather slowly a green tint, which on 
prolonged exposure became a pure blue of considerable intensity. If an alkali was 
added along with or after the phospho-molybdic acid, the blue colour was immediately 
developed. 

10. Solution of potash, soda, and ammonia, and of other alkalies and their carbonates, 
produced a faint yellow colour, which disappeared on the addition of acids. 

11. Negative results were obtained on the addition of iodic acid and starch, nitrate of 
silver, sulphate of zinc, sulphate of copper, and Nessler's reagent. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1013 

Solution of Strophanthin in Water (1 or 2 per cent.). 

1. Concentrated, or 10 per cent, solutions of, sulphuric, nitric, hydrochloric, phosphoric, 
and chromic acid, and concentrated acetic acid, each produced a slight haze even in a one 
per cent, solution of strophanthin. When the solution was afterwards neutralised and 
tested with Fehling's reagent, the reagent was in each case reduced. 

2. Sulphuric acid and bichromate of potassium also produced a slight opalescence, and the 
solution, on being neutralised, reduced Fehling's reagent. 

3. Solutions of potash, soda, ammonia, lime, and baryta, of carbonate of ammonium, and of 
phosphate of sodium, each caused the solution of strophanthin to become of a light yellow 
colour ; but even after prolonged contact, the yellow solutions did not reduce Fehling's 
reagent. The alkaline yellow fluids became deep reddish-brown when heated to 212° F., 
and, at the same time, they lost much of their original bitterness, and apparently also 
of their pharmacological activity. 

4. Solution of ferric chloride produced no change until sulphuric acid had been added, 
when a faint opalescence occurred. When a drop of 0' 5 per cent, solution of strophanthin 
in water was placed on a white porcelain slab, and a minute drop of solution of ferric 
chloride, followed by a small drop of strong sulphuric acid, was added to it, a yellow 
colour was first produced, and then streaks or patches of pink and blue were quickly 
developed. In a short time, the whole assumed a dirty pale greenish-blue colour. 

5. Solution of nitrate of silver very slowly produced a reddish-brown colour and a 
slight dark deposit. 

6. Phospho-molybdic acid slowly produced a bright green colour, which gradually 
passed into greenish-blue. 

7. Tannic acid solution threw down a copious yellowish- white precipitate, which 
redissolved until an excess of the acid had been added. 

8. Molybdate of ammonium in sulphuric acid produced a slight opalescence, and Fehling's 
reagent afterwards revealed the presence of glucose in the neutralised solution. 

9. Negative results were obtained on the addition of chloride of gold, platinic chloride, 
cobaltous chloride, acetate and subacetate of lead, mercuric chloride, mercurous nitrate, cupric 
sulphate, ferro- and ferricyanide of potassium, chloride of barium, acid carbonate of potassium, iodide 
of potassium, tri-iodide of potassium, tri-bromide of potassium, potassio-mercuric iodide, metatungstate 
of sodium, potassio-bismuthic iodide, and potassio-cadmic iodide. 

Decomposition oj Strophanthin by Acids, &c. 

Glucose having been produced by the application to strophanthin of such of the 
above reagents as were acid in reaction, it was indicated that this substance is a 
glucoside. This indication has been rendered clear and unambiguous by the results of 
other experiments, of which the following are given by way of illustration. 

To a colourless and clear 3 '3 per cent, of strophanthin in distilled water, sulphuric 



1014 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

acid was added so as to make the solution a 0'3 per cent, one of acid, and the solution 
was then left to itself at the ordinary temperature. On the following day, it had 
become slightly turbid, and two days afterwards several colourless rosettes of lancet- 
shaped crystals had formed at the bottom of the flask. On the fourth day, the rosettes 
had increased in size, and now also a general crystalline incrustation had occurred over 
the bottom and sides of the flask, while the solution had lost its turbidity, and had 
again become quite clear. The crystals increased in quantity during the next twenty- 
four hours ; and, on the sixth day, when they were collected as carefully as possible, 
they weighed 33*7 per cent, of the strophanthin used. The filtered solution, after 
having been neutralised, was found to contain 22 per cent, of glucose. (Table XI. 
Analysis No. 34.) 

In an experiment with the same quantity of strophanthin and of sulphuric acid in 
solution as in the last experiment, as soon as the solution had been made it was placed 
in the water- bath and gradually heated. While the temperature rose from 150° to 
165° F., a beautiful crystallisation appeared in the solution, consisting of slender colour- 
less crystals, many of them being three-fourths of an inch in length, and the solution 
at the same time became slightly turbid. The temperature was raised to 212°, and 
maintained at this point for half an hour ; during the boiling, an odour like that of cooked 
raisins was given off, and the solution became slightly yellow in colour. When the 
solution had cooled, it was found that, in addition to now partially broken, long and 
slender crystals, a further crystallisation had formed, consisting of colourless nodules 
or tufts attached to the bottom of the flask. The washed and dried crystals weighed 
36 '2 per cent, of the strophanthin used, and there was found in the filtered solution 
27*5 per cent, of glucose. (Table XL Analysis No. 35.) 

On gradually heating a solution of strophanthin which contained 0'5 per cent, 
sulphuric acid, the solution became slightly turbid at 130°, and then, at 152° F., long 
and slender colourless crystals began to form in it. The crystals increased in size 
until the temperature had risen to 160° F., when also the turbidity of the solution 
greatly diminished. After allowing the solution to become cold, 34*9 per cent, of 
crystals were obtained, and the colourless filtrate was found to contain from 15 to 16 
per cent, of glucose. (Table XL Analysis No. 36.) 

Strophanthin dissolved in 1 *5 per cent, sulphuric acid was allowed to stand in the 
cold. On the following day, a small crystalline nodule and tuft, both consisting of 
colourless transparent crystals, had formed at the bottom of the flask. On the third 
day, several large nodules or rosettes had formed, the crystals of which had to the 
naked eye an acicular lancet-shape (Plate VII. fig. 10).* The crystals were collected 
and dried on the fourth day, when they weighed 37 '5 8 per cent, of the strophanthin 
used. The filtered solution was divided into two portions. In one of them the glucose 
was found to be 21 '3 per cent. The second portion was boiled for four hours; during 

* The crystals formed at the bottom of the flask have been represented, unmagnified, in PI. VII. fig. 10, as they 
appeared on looking down upon them through the fluid in the flask. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



1015 



boiling it evolved a cooked raisin odour, became turbid, and, when cooled, deposited 
a yellowish-brown amorphous substance, all of which was not collected. The filtrate of 
the second portion was slightly coloured and only faintly bitter ; and 26*65 per cent, of 
glucose was found in it by Fehling's reagent, and 23 '64 by fermentation. (Table XL 
Analysis No. 40.) 

A summary of the preceding and of several other experiments is given in Table XL 



Table XI. — Summary of Analyses in which Strophanthin was decomposed by Sulphuric Acid. 



o •*> 


Quantity 
of Stro- 
phanthin 

in 
Grammes. 


Per- 
centage 
of Stro- 


Per- 
centage 
of Sul- 


Strophanthidin pro- 


Glucose pro- 
duced in the 


Strophanthidin produced after 


Glucose produced 


6 "rt 
S3 a 


phanthin 
in Solu- 
tion. 


phuric 
Acid. 


duced in the Cold. 


Cold. 


Heating. 


after Heating. 


34 


0-25 


3-3% 


33% 


In six days, 33 7 % 
of crystalline stro- 
phanthidin. 


22% 






35 


0-25 


3-3% 


0-33% 






After boiling for half an hour, 
36 '2 % of crystalline strophan- 
thidin. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
27-5 %. 


36 


0-25 


2-5% 


0-5% 






After heating to 160° F., 34 9 % 
of crystalline strophanthidin. 


After heating to 
160° F., 15 %. 


37 


0-25 


2-5% 


0-5% 






After heating to 170° F., 32-14 % 
of crystalline strophanthidin. 


After heating to 
170° F., 16 5%. 


38 


25 


2-5% 


0-5% 






After boiling for half an hour, 
22'3 % of strophanthidin, chiefly 
in round particles. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
21-2 %. 


39 


0-5 


3-3% 


1'3% 


In five days, 37 "5 


In five days, 


After boiling one half of the fil- 


After boiling one 










% of crystalline 


19%. 


tered solution for four hours, 


half of the filtered 










strophanthidin. 




4*6 per cent, of amorphous 
yellowish-brown substance. 


solution for four 
hours, 24-6 %. 


40 


0-5 


3-3% 


1-5% 


In four days, 37 '58 


In four days, 


After boiling one half of the 


After boiling one 










% of crystalline 


21-3%. 


filtered solution for four hours, 


half of the filtered 










strophanthidin. 




4 - 3 % of yellowish-brown amor- 
phous substance. 


solution for four 
hours, 26-65% by 
Fehling's reagent, 
and 23-64 % by 
fermentation. 


41 


0-25 


3"5% 


2% 






After boiling for half an hour, 
377 % of yellowish-brown 
amorphous substance. 


After boiling for 
half an hour, 
22-02 %. 



Sulphuric acid was the only acid employed to decompose strophanthin ; as it seemed 
unnecessary, for the present purpose, to multiply the experiments, in view of the evidence 
already described regarding the action of other acids on the extract of strophanthus, 
there being no reason to doubt that the decomposition of strophanthin into glucose and 
strophanthidin will occur under the influence of those other acids which have been 
shown to decompose strophanthin in the extract. 

It is seen from the analyses summarised in the above Table (XL) that large quantities 
of crystalline strophanthidin, and considerable quantities of glucose, were produced by the 
prolonged contact in the cold of strophanthin with from 0'3 to 1*5 per cent, sulphuric 
acid. Crystalline strophanthidin was also abundantly produced when strophanthin was 
boiled for a short time with "3 per cent, sulphuric acid ; and much crystalline strophan- 
thidin, but proportionally less glucose, when strophanthin was heated between 160° and 



1016 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

170° F. with 0"5 per cent, sulphuric acid. When, however, strophanthin was boiled with 
stronger than 0'5 per cent, sulphuric acid, although much glucose was generally produced, 
no crystalline strophanthidin, but only a brown amorphous substance, appeared as a 
result of the decomposition. 

The crystals of strophanthidin produced in the cold by sulphuric acid were usually 
in the form of colourless nodules or rosettes, consisting of moderately thick, lancet- 
shaped crystals (Plate VII. fig. 10). The finest crystals, of long and slender form, 
were obtained when strophanthin was heated to 160° or 170° F. with 0'3 and 0'5 per 
cent, sulphuric acid. 

When the decomposition is produced so as to allow the physical changes to be 
observed under the microscope, the changes are found to be much the same as those 
already described in the decomposition, in similar circumstances, of the extract 
(p. 1004), except that the crystals that are formed are absolutely colourless. Thus, 
when a drop of 2 per cent, sulphuric acid was added to a small drop of solution of 
strophanthin, slender rods appeared on the second day, and, on the third day, small 
circular crystalline masses having a radiating structure, which increased in size and 
number during the two following days. In another experiment, the addition of 10 per 
cent, sulphuric acid immediately produced an abundant precipitation of minute particles ; 
and round, clear bodies, and colourless circular crystalline masses, having radial mark- 
ings, appeared during several subsequent days. 

In addition to the influence of acids on strophanthin, that of ptyaline was also 
examined. 0*1 gramme of strophanthin was dissolved in 5 c.c. of distilled water, and to 
the clear solution 2 c.c. of filtered saliva* was added. The now decidedly alkaline mixture 
was digested for an hour at a temperature ranging between 99° and 100° F. The diges- 
tion did not produce any obvious change, nor could any strophanthidin be detected in 
the fluid after it had cooled. When, however, it was tested with Fehling's reagent, 
reduction immediately occurred, and an estimation showed that rather less than one per 
cent, of glucose had been produced. Prolonged contact with saliva at the body tem- 
perature is therefore able to cause only a slight decomposition. As a large quantity 
of saliva of great diastatic activity had been used in this experiment, it is reasonable 
to infer that in the ordinary administration of strophanthus, decomposition will not be 
produced to any appreciable extent by admixture with the mouth secretions. 

The relatively slight decomposition which has been shown to occur (Table X. 
Analysis No. 24) when extract of strophanthus is digested for half an hour with 0"1 per 
cent, hydrochloric acid at a temperature ranging between 98° and 100° F., appears also 
to justify the inference that when strophanthus is introduced into the stomach it will 
be absorbed into the blood before any important part of the dose has undergone decom- 
position. 

* The saliva was obtained, with the usual precautions to exclude impurity, from an adult to whom pilocarpine had 
been administered. It was alkaline in reaction, and neither before nor after prolonged heating, did it affect Fehling's 
solution. A small quantity rapidly and abundantly produced glucose in starch solution. 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1017 

Still, these experiments, and indeed all the experiments in which strophanthin was 
shown to be decomposed by acids, render it not only of interest but probably of practical 
importance to determine, as I propose on some early occasion to do, the pharmacological 
action of strophanthidin itself. 

Strophanthidin. 

In the meantime, in addition to those physical and chemical characters of crystalline 
strophanthidin that have incidentally been mentioned, it may be added that it has an 
intensely bitter taste and a neutral reaction ; that it is slightly soluble in cold water, 
moderately soluble in cold rectified spirit, chloroform, and amyl alcohol, and freely soluble 
in warm rectified spirit ; that it becomes of a green colour when heated with 2 per cent, 
sulphuric acid ; that it does not give a glucose reaction with the phenylhydrazin test, 
nor with Fehling's solution, either before or after prolonged digestion with 2 per cent, 
sulphuric acid between 200° and 212° F. ; and that it is extremely active as a pharma- 
cological agent, 00025 and 000 125 grain producing death in frogs weighing 350 grains 
and 345 grains, respectively, with symptoms closely resembling those produced by 
strophanthin. Further, it can readily be obtained in colourless crystals by the spon- 
taneous evaporation of a solution in rectified spirit. 

As a solution of recrystallised strophanthidin, produced by the decomposition of 
strophanthin by sulphuric acid, remained unchanged when solution of chloride of barium 
was added to it, strophanthidin cannot be regarded as a combination of some substance 
present in strophanthin with the acid employed in decomposing it. 

The amorphous brown substance obtained by boiling strophanthin with moderately 
strong acids has not been examined further than to determine that it is much less bitter 
than either strophanthin or strophanthidin, and that it is insoluble or nearly so in water 
and acids, and soluble in alkalies and rectified spirit. 

Kombic Acid. 

Basic and neutral acetate of lead have been enumerated among the reagents which 
produce precipitates in solutions of the extract in water. The precipitate obtained by 
the former reagent has not been examined. That produced by neutral acetate of lead, 
after having been carefully washed with distilled water, was decomposed by sulphuretted 
hydrogen, and the filtrate from lead sulphide was concentrated by evaporation at a 
low temperature, and then dried in vacuo over sulphuric acid. There was thus obtained 
a scaly brownish-yellow substance, representing 1*6 per cent, of the extract, of strongly 
acid reaction, and freely soluble in water. For this acid, the name Kombic acid is 
suggested. 



1018 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

2. Chemical Composition of other Parts of the Plant. 

An examination was made of the comose appendages, pericarp, and other parts of 
the plant, mainly for the purpose of determining if strophanthin is present in them, 
and, if present, in what quantity. 

Taking advantage of the circumstance that ethyl ether precipitates the glucoside from 
its solutions in alcohol, the process described at page 998 was adopted in the analyses, as 
it appeared to be one that was likely to yield sufficiently accurate results for the purpose 
immediately in view. 

Comose Appendages. 

7000 grains of comose appendages, carefully separated from all other parts of the 
seed, were reduced to a powder by being passed through a Burroughs & Wellcome's 
drug-mill, and the powder was macerated for six weeks with rectified spirit. The 
spirit was removed by pressure in a tincture-press, and the marc was twice afterwards 
saturated with fresh rectified spirit, which also was removed by strong pressure. The 
extract obtained by distilling and evaporating this tincture weighed 136 grains, and 
was of a dark reddish-brown colour, acid reaction, and bitter taste. Distilled water 
imperfectly dissolved it, a dark resinous substance remaining undissolved. The watery 
solution was filtered and several times carefully shaken with ether, and thereby an ether 
extract, weighing 47 '1 grains, was obtained, which was reddish-brown in colour, and had 
a pleasant aromatic odour. The watery solution was then evaporated, and during its con- 
centration a considerable quantity of a dark pitch-like substance separated from it, which, 
when dried, became hard and brittle. The extract obtained on the further evaporation 
of the watery solution had a sweet mucilaginous odour and an acid reaction. It was, for 
the most part, soluble in a small quantity of rectified spirit, the insoluble residue weighing 
6 '5 grains, and having the characters of mucilage. The addition of ether to the alcoholic 
solution produced an abundant precipitate, the alcohol-ether becoming at the same time 
densely milky. After standing for several hours the milkiness disappeared, and the 
decanted alcohol-ether yielded on distillation a further small quantity of resin. The pre- 
cipitate thrown down by ether from the alcohol solution weighed when dry 5035 grains ; 
and it was bitter, markedly acid, amorphous, and of a dark brown colour. 

The chief results of this analysis are stated below. 

Analysis No. 42. 

7000 grains of comose appendages yielded — 

Alcohol extract (8 of rectified spirit to 1 of comose appendages), 136 grains = T94 per cent. 

136 grains of alcohol extract yielded — 

Ethyl ether extract, 471 grains = 3463 per cent, of extract, or - 67 per cent, of comose appendages. 

Mucilage, 6-5 grains = 4"78 „ „ 0-092 

Resin, 30-36 grains = 22-32 „ „ 0-43 

Impure strophanthin, 50-35 grains = 37-02 „ „ 071 „ „ „ 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1019 

As the impure strophanthin was found to have a sweet as well as a bitter taste, it was 
examined for glucose ; and this substance was found to be abundantly present in it, the 
amount indicated by Fehling's solution being so much as 40*3 per cent. In the 50*35 
grains of very impure strophanthin there were, therefore — 

Impure strophanthin, 30-04 grains = 59 "66 per cent. 
Glucose, 20-31 grains = 40-33 „ 

Or, otherwise stated, 136 grains of alcohol extract actually yielded — 

Impure strophanthin, 30 - 04 grains = 22-08 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 0-42 per cent, of comose appendages. 
Glucose, 20-31 grains = 14-93 „ „ „ 0-29 „ „ , 

The presence of strophanthin, or of a body acting like strophanthin, in the above 
ether precipitate (impure strophanthin) was demonstrated by administering 0'005 grain 
of it by subcutaneous injection to a frog weighing 450 grains, when the usual general 
and cardiac actions of a small dose of this active principle were manifested, and this dose 
proved to be a lethal one. 

Chemical tests were less conclusive, owing no doubt to the large quantity of glucose 
present. Dilute sulphuric acid and dilute hydrochloric acid (10 per cent.), with gentle 
heat, each produced a green colour, but in both cases this passed into a dark brown, 
almost black, without intermediate colour changes having been observed ; and dilute 
nitric acid, with heat, produced a brownish-yellow colour, which soon passed into 
gamboge-yellow. 

Search for an Alkaloid. — A small portion of the above impure strophanthin (or ether 
precipitate) was heated with soda lime, when it evolved alkaline fumes, which formed a 
white cloud with strong hydrochloric acid. The precipitate, therefore, contained nitro- 
gen. A 5 per cent, solution was accordingly tested with a number of reagents for 
alkaloids. The results were altogether negative with mercuric chloride, potassio-mercuric 
iodide, tri-iodide of potassium, potassio-bismuthic iodide, potassio-cadmic iodide, meta- 
tungstate of sodium and phosphoric acid, picric acid, sulphate of zinc, and cobaltous 
chloride. On the other hand, tri-bromide of potassium very slowly produced a slight 
amorphous, yellowish- white precipitate ; nitrate of silver, a fairly abundant yellowish- 
white precipitate ; platinic chloride, after several hours, a slight diffused haziness ; and 
chloride of gold and cupric sulphate, each a very faint precipitate. 

The greater part, 40 '5 grains, of the ether precipitate (impure strophanthin) was 
then treated by Stas' method for separating alkaloids. The acid solution in water was 
made distinctly alkaline by carbonate of sodium ; it became much darker in colour, and 
at the same time a strong odour similar to that of ethylamine or methylamine was given 
off. The alkaline solution was carefully shaken with three successive quantities of ethyl 
ether ; the decanted ethers were washed with distilled water and distilled ; and the 
residue was dried. The alkaline solution was then similarly treated with three successive 
quantities of chloroform. The products thus obtained were — 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 P 



1020 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 



Analysis No. 43. 

Ether extract, - 04 grain = 0'098 per cent, of 40 - 5 grains of impure strophanthin. 

Chloroform extract, 0*18 grain = 0*44 „ 40 - 5 „ „ 

Assuming that the whole of the 50'35 grains of impure strophanthin had been sub- 
jected to Stas' process, the results, on the above basis, would have been — 

Ether extract, - 49 grain = 0'036 per cent, of alcohol extractor 0"0007 per cent, of comose 

appendages. 
Chloroform extract, 0"223 grains = - 163 per cent, of alcohol extract, or - 003 per cent, of comose 

appendages. 

Only an insignificant product, therefore, was obtained when the extract derived 
from a very large quantity of the comose appendages was subjected to Stas' process for 
the separation of alkaloids. So small, indeed, was this product that its alkaloidal or 
other characters could not satisfactorily be determined. The following, however, were 
ascertained : — 

The ether product was amorphous, of a brownish-yellow colour, slightly bitter, and 
with a strong aromatic odour. It became opaque when distilled water or dilute acetic 
or hydrochloric acid was brought into contact with it, and it was insoluble in each of 
these liquids, but it was readily dissolved by weak alkalies and again precipitated by 
acids. 

The chloroform product was also amorphous and brownish-yellow, and it had a faint 
aromatic odour and a decidedly bitter taste. It also became opaque when moistened 
with water, or with dilute acetic or hydrochloric acid ; but while it was insoluble in 
water, it was partly soluble in a large bulk of either acid. Prolonged contact with dilute 
acetic acid resulted in a very bitter, yellowish solution being obtained ; and after several 
washings with this acid, the evaporated solutions gave an amorphous slightly coloured 
residue, which weighed only 0*04 grains. When administered by subcutaneous injec- 
tion, 0*01 grain of this residue was found to be a lethal dose for a frog weighing 470 
grains ; and the symptoms, including the changes in the heart's action, were the same 
as those that are produced by strophanthin. The remainder of the 0"04 grains was dis- 
solved in distilled water, and tested with reagents for alkaloids with the following- 
results : — Auric chloride caused a haziness, and tri-bromide of potassium and metatung- 
state of sodium with phosphoric acid each a very slight haze ; but no change was caused 
by potassio-mercuric iodide, platinic chloride, potassio-bismuthic iodide, potassio-cadmic 
iodide, nor by picric acid. 

In another process, in which also 7000 grains of comose appendages were examined 
in the same manner as has above been described, the results were equally inconclusive 
of the existence of an alkaloid. It is a significant fact that when the alcoholic extract of 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1021 

the appendages is made alkaline, a volatile body of alkaline reaction is disengaged, which 
has the peculiar odour of ethylamine or methylamine. 

That an alkaloid exists in the appendages has been frequently asserted on the autho- 
rity of Hardy and Gallois, who have gone so far as to designate it " Ineine." They, 
however, give very imperfect evidence of its existence, although they appear to have had 
a sufficient quantity of the substance to enable them to make several pharmacological 
experiments with it. They state that it does not act on the heart as Strophanthus 
does, but at the same time they do not state how it does act, and even if it has any 
pharmacological action whatever. 

The very minute product which I have obtained by Stas' process is, however, an 
active substance, with so close pharmacological resemblances to strophanthin itself, that 
it might well be merely impure strophanthin or an impure decomposition product of that 
glucoside. At any rate, the endeavours I have made, working with very large quantities of 
materials, to separate an alkaloid from the comose appendages, have failed to give evidence 
of the existence of an alkaloid. 

Placenta. 

By percolating 274 grains of placenta with 7 ounces of rectified spirit ( = 11 of spirit to 
1 of placenta), an extract weighing 8*4 grains ( = 3*06 per cent, of placenta) was obtained. 
When this extract was mixed with a little water and several times shaken with ethyl 
ether, 1'86 grains of ethereal extract ( = 0'67 per cent, of placenta) was separated from it, 
leaving 6*39 grains of dry alcohol extract ( = 2'33 per cent, of placenta). 

Analysis No. 44. 

From this 6*39 grains of alcohol extract there was obtained — 

Impure strophanthin, 1-7 grain = 26*5 per cent, of alcohol extract, or - 62 per cent, of placenta. 
Mucilage, 3-6 grains = 56-3 „ „ „ 131 ,, „ 

Resin, &c, - 895 grain = 14 „ „ „ 0"32 „ „ 

This impure strophanthin became of a dark violet colour when it was heated with 
10 per cent, sulphuric acid, and one-tenth of a grain was rapidly fatal to a frog, and 
produced the ordinary pharmacological effects of strophanthin. 

Endocarp. 

The tincture obtained by percolating 548 grains of powdered endocarp of the follicle 
with 5 ounces of rectified spirit ( = 4 of spirit to 1 of endocarp) yielded 13'44 grains, or 
2*45 per cent, of extract, from which there was obtained — 

Analysis No. 45. 

Ethyl ether extract, 3-7 grains = 27 - 529 per cent, of extract, or 0*675 per cent, of endocarp. 
Alcohol extract, 10-54 grains = 78-422 „ „ 1-923 „ „ 



1022 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHTJS HISPIDUS. 

On further examination, the 10 '5 4 grains of alcohol extract was found to contain — 

Impure strophanthin, 5*7 grains = 54*07 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 1*03 per cent, of endocarp. 
Mucilage, 3*67 grains = 34*8 1 „ ,, „ 0-67 ,, „ 

Resin, 1' grain = 9*48 „ „ „ 0*18 „ ,, 

This impure strophanthin was freely soluble in water, acid in reaction, and strongly 
bitter, though at the same time sweetish in taste. It was examined for glucose, and 
12 per cent, of this substance was found in it; so that in 5*7 grains there was 5*02 
grains, or 88'07 per cent, of impure strophanthin and 0"68 grains of glucose. 

Stated otherwise, 5 '7 grains of very impure strophanthin contained — 

Impure strophanthin, 5*02 grains = 47*62 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 0*91 per cent, of endocarp. 
Glucose, 0*68grains = 6*45 „ „ „ 0*124 „ ,, 

This impure strophanthin was amorphous, and of a pale brown colour and acid 
reaction. It gave indistinctly the chemical reactions of strophanthin, and 0*002 grain 
of it, by subcutaneous injection, was found to be a lethal dose for a frog, the pharmaco- 
logical effects being those of strophanthin. 

Pericarp. 

548 grains of the entire pericarp (including endocarp) of the follicle (see p. 981), 

reduced to a coarse powder, gave, by percolation with four parts of rectified spirit, an 

extract which weighed 9 '92 grains, or 1*8 per cent, of the pericarp. This extract 

yielded — 

Analysis No. 46. 

Ether extract, 3*8 grains = 38*306 per cent, of extract, or 0*693 per cent, of pericarp. 
Alcohol extract, 5 - 9 grains = 59*475 „ „ 1*076 ,, „ 

From this 5*9 grains of alcohol extract there was obtained — 

Impure strophanthin, 3*25 grains = 55*06 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 0*59 per cent, of pericarp. 
Mucilage, 2*32 grains = 39*32 „ „ „ 0*42 „ „ 

Resin, 0*23 grain = 3*89 „ „ „ 0*04 „ „ 

The impure strophanthin was pale brown, acid, and hygroscopic ; and it had a saline 
and only faintly bitter taste, and an aromatic odour. It contained an undetermined 
quantity of glucose. In its dry state a large number of minute acicular crystals were 
present in it, but these crystals disappeared when it became soft and liquid on exposure 
to the air. Chemical tests gave indistinct evidence of the presence of strophanthin. It 
possessed very feeble pharmacological activity, as 0'2 grain, administered by subcutaneous 
injection to a frog, weighing 427 grains, did not cause death, although this dose was 
sufficient to cause slight strophanthin symptoms. 

Leaves. 

100 grains of dried and well-preserved leaves, obtained from Mr Buchanan, were 
ground to a coarse powder, and extracted with rectified spirit. The alcoholic extract 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHTTS HISPIDTTS. 1023 

obtained from this tincture was- of a dark green colour and acid reaction, and it weighed 
5 "51 grains. It was further examined so as to determine the quantity of its chief con- 
stituents. 

Analysis No. 47. 

Impure strophanthin, 127 grain = 23 04 per cent, of alcoholic extract. 

Crystalline substance, 36 grain = 6 53 „ „ 

Mucilage, 027 grain = 4 - 9 ,, „ 

Resin, chlorophyll, fat (?), &c. 3 - 405 grains = 6179 „ „ 

The leaves, therefore, contain only a small quantity of strophanthin, and a large 
quantity of resin mixed with chlorophyll, &c. The impure strophanthin, which was pre- 
cipitated from an alcoholic solution by ethyl ether, was freely soluble in water, translucent, 
brownish-yellow, and bitter, and it gave a characteristic but dirty violet colour when 
heated with dilute sulphuric acid, and also produced the ordinary pharmacological effects 
of strophanthin when the one-hundredth of a grain was injected under the skin of a frog. 

The crystalline substance was obtained during the evaporation of a watery solution 
of the impure strophanthin. It crystallised in minute tufts of a pale brown colour, 
which, on microscopic examination, were found to consist of slender radiating needles. 
The crystals were nearly insoluble in rectified spirit, but were slightly soluble in water, 
and they were destitute of bitterness. When heated with dilute sulphuric acid, they for 
the most part dissolved and formed a bright yellow solution, which remained unchanged 
for many hours. One-twentieth of a grain, administered by subcutaneous injection, 
produced very slight effects in a frog, which recovered after exhibiting for two days 
symptoms of motor weakness with spastic phenomena, and slowing of the respirations. 

Bark of the Branches. 

When extracted with rectified spirit, the bark of the slender branches, sent by Mr 
Buchanan (p. 978), yielded 3 *42 per cent, of extract, which was destitute of bitterness, 
having only a taste like that of wood. From a concentrated alcoholic solution of this 
extract, ether threw down a small precipitate, which amounted only to '75 per cent, of 
the bark, or 22 per cent, of the extract. The precipitate was soluble in water, and while 
the watery solution was being evaporated several long needle-shaped crystals appeared 
in it. Chemical and pharmacological examination of the precipitate failed, however, to 
give any evidence of the presence of strophanthin in it ; and even 0"2 grain produced no 
effect when injected under the skin of a frog. 

Bark of Stem. 

Even a smaller quantity of alcoholic extract (1*5 per cent.) was obtained from the bark 
of the stem (p. 978). It also was devoid of bitterness, and no strophanthin could be 
detected in it by chemical or pharmacological tests. 



1024 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPJDUS. 

Root. 

Some fresh roots from plants grown in the Edinburgh Botanic Garden were grated 
and partially dried at from 100° to 103° F. The water lost was found to represent 33'34 
per cent, of the weight. 119T2 grains of this incompletely dried root yielded 65 grains 
of dark reddish-brown alcohol extract, representing 5 '457 per cent. 

Further analysis of this extract gave the following results — 

Analysis No. 48. 

Sixty-five grains alcohol extract yielded — 

Ethyl ether extract, 8*6 grains = 13*23 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 0722 per cent, of dried root. 
Alcohol extract, 56*12 grains = 86*34 „ ,, 4*712 „ „ 

The ether extract was of a reddish-brown colour, and it had a peculiar aromatic odour, 
and an acrid and slightly bitter taste. The alcohol extract was reddish-brown, acid and 
amorphous, and it had a distinctly bitter taste. A small quantity dissolved in water was 
tested with the following results : — -Tri-bromide of potassium produced a slight haze, which 
afterwards subsided as a yellowish -brown precipitate, leaving a nearly colourless super- 
natant fluid ; tannic acid produced a slight precipitate ; ferric chloride, a slight haze, 
becoming a brown precipitate ; and phospho-molybdic acid and potash, a blue colour : but 
no important ehange occurred with potassio -mercuric chloride, tri-iodide of potassium, 
platinic chloride, mercuric chloride, potassio -bismuthic iodide, chloride of gold, or picric 
acid. 

Analysis No. 49. 

The 56*12 grains of alcohol extract yielded on further examination — 

Impure strophanthin, 13*26 grains = 23*627 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 1*113 per cent, of dried root. 
Mucilage, 40* grains = 71*22 „ „ 3*35 „ „ 

Resin, 2*7 grains = 4*81 „ „ 0*226 „ „ 

The impure strophanthin was bitter, but it obviously contained much impurity, being 
brown in colour, and very difficult to dry, even in vacuo, over sulphuric acid. It, however, 
gave the pharmacological, and less distinctly the chemical, reactions of strophanthin. 

When examined for glucose, so large a quantity as 41*8 per cent, was found to be 
present; so that in the 13'26 grains of this very impure strophanthin there were 5'55 
grains of glucose, and only 871 grains (or 6 5 '6 8 per cent.) of impure strophanthin. 

Stated otherwise, from 65 grains of alcohol extract (Analysis No. 48) there were 
obtained — 

Impure strophanthin, 8*71 grains = 13*4 per cent, of alcohol extract, or 0*731 per cent, of dried root. 
Glucose, 5*5 grains = 8*54 ,, „ 0*46 ,, „ 

The foregoing account of an examination of various parts of the Strophantus hispidus 
plant has shown that strophanthin is present in many other parts besides the seeds, as, 



DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1025 

of the parts examined, the bark of the stem and branches alone failed to give evidence 
of its presence. The endocarp and placenta of the follicles and the comose appendages 
of the seeds were found to contain larger quantities than the roots, leaves, or epi- and 
mesocarp. In none of these parts of the plant, however, is it so largely present as in the 
seeds, and none of them can so conveniently be used as the seeds to produce strophanthin 
or the pharmaceutical preparations of Strophanthus. 

(The pharmacology of Strophanthus hispidus will be described in a future part of the 
Transactions. ) 



EXPLANATION OF PLATES. 
Plate I. 

A. One of four arrows in the Materia Medica Museum, University of Edinburgh, tied together, and labelled 

by Sir Robert Christison, " Poisoned arrows from the interior of Africa, poison unknown." Poison 
found to be Strophanthus. 
(The brown colour in this and the other arrows indicates the poison composition smeared on the arrow.) 

B. One of above four arrows. Poison also found to be Strophanthus. As this arrow closely resembles Kirk's 

arrow (p. 957), it is probable that it, as well as arrow A, has been obtained from the Zambesi 
country. 

C. Arrow from a district 75 miles N.N.W. of Zanzibar. From Dr Felkin. Stated to be poisoned with the 

substance contained in packet J, Plate II. Found to be inert. 

D. Arrow from Wanyika country, north of Zanzibar. From Dr Felkin. Also stated to be poisoned with the 

substance contained in packet J, Plate II. Found to be active. 

E. One of five similar arrows in the Materia Medica Museum, University of Edinburgh, labelled " Arrows from 

Negroes of River Gambir, poison unknown." Poison found to be Strophanthus. 

Plate II. 

F. Arrow from the Shire District of East Africa. From Mr Buchanan. Poisoned with Strophanthus. 

G. Arrow also from the Shire District. From Mr Buchanan. Poisoned with Strophanthus. 

H. Arrow from the West Side of Lake Tanganyika. From Dr Tomory. Poison unknown. Found to have a 

Strophanthus action. 
7. Scraped mature follicle of Strophanthus hispidus. Hairs of the comose appendages of the seeds are seen 

protruding through the partially split placental surface of the follicle. 
J. Packet of Wanyika poison. From Dr Felkin. Poison very active, and similar in action to Strophanthus. 



Plate III. 

Fig. 1. Root from small Strophanthus hispidus plant, one year old, grown in Royal Botanic Garden, Edin- 
burgh. Natural size. 

Fig. 2. Portion of root from mature plant, sent preserved in spirit from the Shire District, East Africa. 
Natural size. 

Fig. 3. Transverse section through a constricted portion of above root from mature plant, from Africa, x 6. 

Fig. 4. Transverse section through a swollen portion of same root from Africa, showing great development of 
food-storing cellular tissue. x 6. 

Fig. 5. Leaf from a plant, one year old, grown in Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh. Natural size. 



1026 DR THOMAS R. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 

Fig. 6. Inflorescence, sent as a dried specimen from the Shire District of East Africa. In the expanded 
flowers, the prolongations of the corolla-lobes are seen as long and drooping tails ; whereas in the 
flower-buds they are seen (a) to be twisted together, and to project upwards. Natural size. 

Fig. 7. Flower-bud and fully developed flower. The contrast in appearance between the prolongations of the 
corolla-lobes in tbe fully developed flower and in the flower-bud (a) is clearly exhibited. x 1J. 

Fig. 8. Longitudinal section of fully developed flower, showing (a) the five stamens closely surrounding the 
pistil, xlj. 

Fig. 9. Stamen, x 4. 

Fig. 10. Pistil, showing cleft stigma and hirsute carpels, x 2. 

Plate IV. 

Fig. 1. Surface-view of stem, from Africa. Natural size. 

Fig. 2. Transverse section of stem, showing thick cork layer. Natural size. 

Fig. 3. Follicles dehiscing. Natural size. 

Fig. 4. Mature follicles, reduced one-third, showing position of the two follicles when ripe. 

Fig. 5. Transverse section of unripe follicle, from the Shire District, preserved in spirit. The line of future 
dehiscence is indicated at x. Natural size. 

Fig. 6. Seed with comose appendage. Dorsal view of seed. Natural size. 

Fig. 7. a, ventral or parietal, and b, dorsal views of seeds. Natural size. In 7 a, the spot indicating the 
entrance of the funiculus is shown at x. 

Fig. 8. a, dorsal, aud b, lateral view of specially large seeds. Natural size. In 8 b, the position of the funi- 
culus is shown at x. 

Fig. 9. Magnified view of the base or root of one of the hairs of the tuft of the comose appendage of the seed. 
x230. 

Fig. 10. a, base, and b, apex of the same hair as fig. 9, less magnified. x 52. 

Fig. 11. Small tufts or groups of the fine basal seed-hairs, which are interposed between the seeds and the inner 
surface of the endocarp. Natural size. 

Fig. 12. a and b, magnified tufts of above hairs :12 a, showing the roots, and 12 b, the apices. x 52. 

Fig. 13. Immature seed showing the fine and relatively long hairs attached to the base of the seed. The hairs 
have been teased out a little, in order to display them more distinctly, x 6. 



Plate V. 

Fig. 1. Transverse section of swollen portion of root of mature plant, from Africa. Same section as fig. 4, 
Plate III., but more highly magnified, a, layer of cork tissue ; b, cork cambium ; d, very broad 
cellular rind of food-storing cells, many containing conglomerate crystals ; e, wedge-shaped masses 
of bast tissue, with conglomerate crystals in a few of the cells ; /, cambium layer ; and g, central 
wood cylinder, exhibiting annual (?) growth rings. x 80. 

Fig. 2. Transverse section of one-year old stem, from Edinburgh Botanic Garden, a, cork ; b, cork cambium ; 
c, indurated cells of cellular layer ; d, ordinary cells of cellular layer, many containing conglomerate 
crystals, with an outer zone of shaded cells containing numerous chlorophyll corpuscles ; e, bast 
tissue ; /, cambium ; g, wood ; h, internal bast ; *, pith. x 75. 

Fig. 3. Transverse section of outer part of old stem, from Africa. Same lettering as in fig. 2. x 75. 

Fig. 4. Longitudinal section of same stem as in fig. 3. A large portion of the inner wood region is not 
figured. Lettering the same as in figs. 2 and 3. In the bast tissue, e, besides bast cells, a sieve 
vessel and laticiferous cell are shown ; and in the wood, g, dotted and spiral vessels are seen at the 
interior portion. x 300. 

Fig. 5. Transverse section of an unripe follicle, sent in spirit from the Shire District, showing the placenta 
and immature seeds, as well as the layers of the pericarp, a. epicarp ; b, mesocarp ; c, endocarp ; 
z, tufts of basal seed-hairs. The line of future dehiscence is faintly indicated at x. Many of the 
seeds have fallen out. x 6. 



DR THOMAS It. FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. 1027 

Fig. 5a. Transverse section of epiearp and of outer mesocarp cells, from a hard mature follicle, a, epicarp ; 

b, mesocarp. x 150. 
Fig. 5b. Longitudinal section of mesocarp, composed of latex cells embedded in cells of matrix, from an 

immature follicle. x 150. 
Fig. 5c. Longitudinal section of endocarp, from a hard mature follicle, consisting of indurated cells, which, a, 

in the external layer (next mesocarp) are arranged longitudinally, and b, in the internal layer are 

arranged transversely (circumferentially). x 230. 
Fig. 5c?. Transverse section of endocarp from a hard mature follicle, showing the longitudinal direction in this 

section of the internal cells (o), and the transverse (circumferential) direction of the external cells (a). 

x52. 

Plate VI. 

Fig. 1. Longitudinal section of seed cut parallel with its flat surfaces, a, testa, bearing hairs, and prolonged 
above to form the base of the stalk of the comose appendage ; b, tegmen, slightly developed ; c, 
albumen ; d, root-cap of embryo ; e, radicle of embryo ; /, one of the two cotyledons. x 30. 

Fig. 2. Transverse section of seed, near position of the letter / in fig. 1. Lettering as in fig. 1; and/, coty- 
ledons, g, raphe. x 50. 

Fig. 3. Longitudinal section of testa and tegmen. a, testa ; b, tegmen. x 150. 

Fig. 4. Internal view of testa, showing hoops of thickening on the primary membrane of each cell. x 350. 

Fig. 5. Longitudinal section of albumen. The starch granules have been stained with iodine, x 150. 

Fig. 6. Transverse section of testa, tegmen, and albumen, a, testa ; b, tegmen ; c, albumen. The starch 
granules have been stained with iodine, x 150. 

Fig. 7. Transverse section of cotyledon. The lower part shows the natural appearance, and the upper part 
(a) the appearance after treatment with |- per cent, osmic acid solution, indicating a large quantity 
of oil. x 350. 

Fig. 8. Transverse section of cotyledon, after treatment with ether. x 350. 



Plate VII. 

Fig. 1. Semi-diagrammatic representation of longitudinal section of mature seed, cut parallel with the narrow 

diameter. Same lettering as in Plate VI. figs. 1 and 2. g,g, raphe, with vascular bundle of 

funiculus passing into the seed at the upper g. x 20. 
Fig. 2. Interior of the dorsal aspect of a follicle, displayed by removing the pericarp. The seeds are nearly 

concealed by the fine and relatively long basal seed-hairs covering them, which, in the entire follicle, 

are interposed between the seeds and the endocarp. The upper portion exhibits the compressed 

stalks and tufts of the comose appendages. Natural size. 
Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6. Transverse sections of mature follicles in various stages of dehiscence, showing stages of 

opening of the follicle at its ventral surface, and of uncoiling of the placenta, p. Natural size. 
Fig. 7. Crystalline groups of Strophanthin, slowly formed in a dilute alcoholic solution after the addition of 

ether, x 6. 
Fig. 8. Crystalline Strophanthin (impure 1 ?) obtained by the evaporation of a watery solution of alcoholic 

extract of Strophanthus. x 195. 
Fig. 9. Usual microscopic appearance of Strophanthin obtained by the process described at page 1008. x 52. 
Fig. 10. Stropanthidin formed spontaneously in a solution of Strophanthin acidulated with sulphuric acid. 

Natural size. 



VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 21). 7 Q 



Trans. Roy. Soc. EdinT- Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS.- Plate I: 



PStoi, 




, k 






\ 



m v 



M l Fa-cla.ne &. Erskme. Litlf* Edin r 



Trans. Roy. Soc. EdinT-Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. — Plate II. 




MTa-xla-Tie &■ Erskine, Litte'J 



Trans. Roy. Soc. Eclm r - Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. — Plate III. 




M'Fe.T^.a.rn- . : . Exskme L. I h! ; f;dir, r 



Trans. Roy. Soc. EdinT- Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTUS HISPIDUS.— Plate IV. 




12. b 



M'Fatla.Tie t*. Eraklne, LithT * Edia r 



- -- « 

i 




Trans. Roy. Soc. Edm r - Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. — Plate V. 




MFa.Tl3.ne & Krskine. Litk r J Zdm : 



Trans. Roy. S oc . EdinT-Vol. XXXV. 
FRASER ON STROPHANTUS HISPIDUS. - Plate VI. 



SSI IS 



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Trans. Roy. Soc. EdirT, Vol. XXXV 
FRASER ON STROPHANTHUS HISPIDUS. — Plate Vlt. 




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M c Farlane Je Erskine, LitV* Edir 



( 1029 ) 



XXII. — On the Foundations of the Kinetic Theory of Gases. III. 

By Professor Tait. 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



Introductory, 1029 

Part XV. Special Assumption as to Mole- 
cular Force, . . .1031 
„ XVI. Average Values of Encounter and 

of Impact, . . . .1031 
„ XVII. Effect of Encounters onFreePath, 1035 
„ XVIII. Average Duration of Entangle- 
ment, and consequent Average 
Kinetic Energy, . . . 1037 



PAGE 



Appendix — 

A. Coefficient of Restitution less than 

Unity, 1038 

B. Law of Distribution of Speed, . . 1039 

C. Viscosity, 1039 

D. Thermal Conductivity, . . .1040 



I have explained at some length, in my " Reply to Prof. Boltzmann," * the circum- 
stances under which the present inquiry originated and has been pursued. Of these I 
need now only mention two : — -first, the very limited time which I can spare for such 
work ; second, the very meagre acquaintance I possessed of what had been already done 
with regard to the subject. My object has been to give an easily intelligible investiga- 
tion of the Foundations of the Kinetic Theory ; and I have, in consequence, abstained 
from reading the details of any investigation (be its author who he may) which seemed 
to me to be unnecessarily complex. Such a course has, inevitably, certain disadvantages, 
but its manifest advantages far outweigh them. 

In August 1888, however, I was led in the course of another inquiry t to peruse rapidly 
the work of Van der Waals, Die Continuitdt des gasformigen und flussigen Zustandes. 
This shows me that Lorenz had anticipated me in making nearly the same correction of 
the Virial equation as that given in the earlier part of § 30 of my first paper. His 
employment of the result is a totally different one from mine ; he uses it to find a 
correction for the number of impacts. The desire to make, at some time, this investi- 
gation arose with me when I was writing my book on Heat, as will be seen in the last 
paragraphs of § 427 of that book. It was caused by my unwillingness to contemplate 
the existence of molecular repulsion in any form, and my conviction that the effects 

* Proc. R. S.E., January 1888; Phil. Mag., March 1888. 

t " Report on some of the Physical Properties of Water," Phys. Ghem. Chall. Exp., Part IV. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 22). 7 R 



1030 PROFESSOR TAIT ON THE 

ascribed to it could be explained by the mere resilience involved in the conception of 
impacts. 

The present paper consists of instalments read to the Society at intervals during the 
years 1887, 8. The first of these, which is also the earliest in point of date, deals with 
a special case of molecular attraction, on which, of course, depends the critical tempera- 
ture, and the distinction between gases and vapours. Here the particles which, at any 
time, are under molecular force have a greater average kinetic energy than the rest. 
Mathematical, or rather numerical, difficulties of a somewhat formidable nature inter- 
fered with the exact development of these inquiries. I found, for instance, that in spite 
of the extreme simplicity of the special assumption made as to the molecular force, 
the investigation of the average time between the encounter of two particles and their 
final disengagement from one another involves a quadrature of a very laborious kind. 
Thus the correction of the number of impacts could not easily be made except by 
some graphic process. 

One reason for the postponement of publication of the present part was the hope that 
I might be enabled to append tables of the numerical values of the chief integrals which 
it involves, especially the peculiarly interesting one 






X i x -dx . 



Want of time, however, forced me to substitute for complete tables mere graphical re- 
presentations of the corresponding curves, drawn from a few carefully calculated values. 
These are not fitted for publication, though they were quite sufficient to give a general 
notion of the numerical values of the various results of the investigation; and enabled 
me to take the next step : — viz. the approximate determination of the form of the Virial 
equation when molecular attraction is taken account of. Part IV. of this investigation, 
containing this application, was read to the Society on Jan. 21, 1889, and an Abstract 
has appeared in the Proceedings. It appears that the difference of average kinetic 
energy between a free, and an entangled, particle is of special importance in the physical 
interpretation of the Virial Equation. 

An Appendix is devoted to the consideration of the modification which the previous 
results undergo when the coefficient of restitution is supposed to be less than 1. This 
extension of the investigation was intended as an approximation to the case of radiation 
from the particles of a gas, and the consequent loss of energy. But, so far as I have 
developed it, no results of any consequence were obtained. I met with difficulties of a 
very formidable order, arising mainly from the fact that the particles after impact do not 
always separate from one another. The full treatment of the impact of a single particle 
with a double one is very tedious ; and the conditions of impact of two double particles 
are so complex as to be totally unfit for an elementary investigation like the present. 

The remainder of the Appendix is devoted to two points, raised by Professors 
Newcomb and Boltzmann, respectively : — the first being the problem of distribution of 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1031 

speed in the " special " state ; — the other involving a second approximation to the 
estimates of Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity already given in Part II. 

XV. Special Assumption as to Molecular Force. 

§ 57. To simplify the treatment of the molecular attraction between two particles, 
let us make the assumption that the kinetic energy of their relative motion changes by 
a constant (finite) amount at the instant when their centres are at a distance a apart. 
This will be called an Encounter. There will be a refraction of the direction of their 
relative path, exactly analogous to that of the path of a refracted particle on the corpus- 
cular theory of light. To calculate the term of the virial (§ 30) which corresponds to 
this, we must find 

(a) The probability that the relative speed before encounter lies between u and u + du. 

(b) The probability that its direction is inclined from 6 to 6 + dd to the line of centres 
at encounter. 

(c) The magnitude of the encounter under these conditions, and its average value. 
Next, to find the (altered) circumstances of impact, we must calculate 

(d) The probability that an encounter, defined as above, shall be followed by an impact. 

(e) The circumstances of the impact. 

(f) The magnitude of the impact, and its average value per encounter. 

In addition to these, we should also calculate the number of encounters per second, 
and the average duration of the period from encounter to final disentanglement, in order 
to obtain (from the actual speeds before encounter) the correction for the length of the free 
path of each. This, however, is not easy. But it is to be observed that, in all probability, 
this correction is not so serious as in the case when no molecular force is assumed. For, 
in that case the free path is always shortened; whereas, in the present case it depends 
upon circumstances whether it be shortened or lengthened. Thus, if the diameters of the 
particles be nearly equal to the encounter distance, there will in general be shortening of 
the paths, and consequent diminution of the time between successive impacts : — if the 
diameters be small in comparison with the encounter distance, the whole of the paths will 
be lengthened and the interval between two encounters may be lengthened or shortened. 
Thus if we assume an intermediate relation of magnitude, there will be (on the average) 
but little change in the intervals between successive impacts. Hence also the time 
during which a particle is wholly free will be nearly that calculated as in § 14, with the 
substitution, of course, of a for s. 

XVI. Average Values of Encounter and of Impact, 

§ 58. The number of encounters of a v, with a %, in directions making an angle fi with 
one another, is by § 21 proportional to 

w^Dq sin /3i/3 , 
where % 2 = v 2 + v^ — 2vv x cos /3 



1032 PROFESSOR TA1T ON THE 

Heuce the number of encounters for which the relative speed is from u to u + du 
proportional to 

uHuf^i . . (l) 

The limits of v x are v±u, or u±v, according as v>u, and those of v are to <x> , so that 
the integral is 

The first term of this integral may be written as 



y»oo 



and the second as 






2 


Together, these amount to 






/ 2 7 -2fta?2 / _2Aar2 

/ xdxB +uf axs 



The first term vanishes, and the second is 

u 

2V 2h 



U I IT 



Thus the value of (l) is 

u 3 du -hupp I rr ro . 

HT 6 \/W (2) - 



But, on the same scale, the whole number of encounters in the same time is 

Thus the fraction of the whole encounters, which takes place with relative speed 
u to u + du, is 

whose integral, from to oo , is 1 as it ought to be. 

§ 59. Now these relative motions are before encounter distributed equally in all 
directions. Let us deal therefore only with those which are parallel to a given line. 
The final result will be of the same character relative to all such lines; and therefore 
the encounters will not disturb the even distribution of directions of motion. 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1033 

Refer the motion to the centre, 0, of one of the encountering particles. Let A be 
the point midway between the particles at encounter, B that of impact, the encountering 
particle coming parallel to CO. Let OA = a/2, OB (as before) = s/2. Let 6, <j> be the 




angles of incidence and refraction at encounter, \jj that of incidence at impact, u and w 
the relative speeds before and after the encounter. Then 

u sin 6 = w sin ; 

and, if Pc 2 represent double the work done in the encounter by the molecular forces, 

u 2 cos 2 6 + c 2 = w 2 cos 2 <p 
so that 

U 2 + C 2 = W 2 . 

Also it is obvious from the diagram that 



au 



s sin i|r = a sin <p = — sin 6 



w 



Hence the encounter will not be followed by an impact if 

sm0> 

au 

§ 60. We must next find the average value of an encounter, and also of an impact ; 
in the latter case taking account of all the encounters whether or not they involve an 
impact. 

The numerical value of the encouDter-impulse in the above figure is evidently 

~P(w cos <p — u cos 0)/2 , 

which must be doubled to include the repetition on separation ; and the average value, 
when the relative speed is u, is 

2P / sin 6 cos 6(w cos <j> — u cos 6)d0 



= S( (c2+u2)f_c3_u3 ) (3) - 



1034 PROFESSOR TAIT ON THE 

The value of the subsequent impact is 

— Pio cos \/r , 
and the average value 



2PWcos 6 sin /l - °J^ s i n *qm . 



When siv>au, the limits are and |, and the value is 

2 p s 2 ™ 2 /., / a 2 u*\f\ 

But when sw<jau, the limits are and sin -1 — , and the value is 



aw 



2-r, s 2 w 2 . , 

By (2) and (3) we find as the average value of the encounter, taking account of all 
possible relative speeds, 

P 



+ 3' 



-«V' 



; h 2 1 udu ( (c 2 + U 2 )a —G Z -U Z J, 

or, if we write for simplicity, 

e 2 ±=Ac 2 /2, 

■«5»{ , *(»>/i-*^' , "* w »)- , ' /w -'v1} 

The expression obviously vanishes, as it ought to do, when e = 0. And it is always 
positive, for its differential coefficient with respect to e is 

In a similar way (4) and (5) give, with (2), as the average impact per encounter, 



a/ci* -a* 



KC 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1035 

The first integral we have already had as part of the encounter. To simplify the 
second, let s/a = cos a, and it becomes 

/C cot a 
udue ~ w2/2 (u? + c 2 —u 2 sec 2 a)' i > 

which, with c 2 — u 2 tan 2 <x = z 2 , gives 



+5(z 2 -C 2 )cot 2 a 

cot 2 a / z*dze 



or 



<V-COt a 



(|) tan 3 a |-*»«**-P / aAfajS* 1 



The whole is now 



R = 



/<V 7 , . *,? Z* ^ cot « I 

\ /9\l -?£-COt2a / 2 I 



= -^^{ e e2 y|+ V2e - V2(/ o *"*% + v '2«tan*a- ^""'Wa^ ."&>} 

= -^cos 2 a{g ea v /^+V2e 8 ec 2 a- N /2gy s^dy- J2r* e0t \s,n*aj e x2 dxl , 
which, when e = and cos a = 1 , becomes 

~ P V 21 
as in § 30. 

It would at first sight appear that the value of the impact is finite (=— Pe./V) 

when there is no nucleus (i.e. a=«A But, in such a case, we must remember that the 

second part of the first expression for E above has no existence. In fact the value of 
the second of the two integrals is ^2 tan 3 a . e cot a, when e cot a is small ; and this 
destroys the apparently non-vanishing term. 

XVII. Effect of Encounters on the Free Path. 

§ 61. If two particles of equal diameters impinge on one another, the relative path 
must obviously be shortened on the average by 



f ' 2 2tt sin 6 cos 2 6d0 



2s 
3 ' 



7 2tt sin 6 cos l 
o 

But if v, Vi be their speeds, and v their relative speed, the paths are shortened respect- 
ively by the fractions v/v and v^Vq of this. The average values must be equal, so that 
we need calculate one only. 



1036 PROFESSOR TAIT ON THE 

Now the average value of v/v is obviously 

Jvv]V sin /3d8 



JvviVq sin BdB 

where /3 is the angle between the directions of motion, so that 

vv 1 sin fid/3 = v dv . 
Hence the average above is 



A 



- y^v ^h - l 



r- 



,*dv ~ V3 ~ J*E r l - 2 



vv 



Hence the mean of the free paths during a given period becomes 

1 J2s. 

J2n7rs 2 3 ' 

that is, it is shortened in the ratio 

~[ — -mrS 3 : 1 
o 



or 



1 — 4 (sum of vols, of spheres in unit vol.) : 1 = 1 — ^ : 1 say. 



Hence the number of collisions per second, already calculated, is too small in the 
same ratio. 

Thus the value of 2(R) in § 30 must be increased in the ratio 1 : 1 — y , and the virial 
equation there given becomes 

If this were true in the limit, the ultimate volume would be double of that before calcu- 
lated, i.e. 8 times the whole volume of the particles. 

§ 62. Another mode of obtaining the result of § 61 is to consider the particles as 
mere points, and to find the average interval which elapses between their being at a 
distance s from one another and their reaching the positions where their mutual distance 
is least. The space passed over by each during that time will have to be subtracted 
from the length of the mean free path calculated as in § 11 when the particles were 
regarded as mere circular discs. 

The average interval just mentioned is obviously 

, / 8 cos 6 . sin cos QdQ „ 

it pi 3u 

/ sin 6 cos Odd 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1037 

Hence the average space passed over in that interval is 

72 s 



f» fiv. v jvldv.l\*=J- 
ZuJ vv 1 1 3 



If we put a for s in this expression we have the amount to be subtracted from the 
average path between two encounters in consequence of the finite size of the region of 
encounter. 

XVIII. Average Duration of Entanglement, and consequent Average Kinetic Energy. 

§ 63. We have next to find the average duration of entanglement of two particles : — 
i.e., the interval during which their centres are at a distance less than a. 
The whole relative path between the entering and leaving encounters is 

2(a cos 0— s cos -^r) , 
or 

la cos , 

according as there is, or not, an impact. 

Hence the whole time of entanglement is the quotient, when one or other is divided 
by io. And the average value, for relative speed u, is 

t = — 2 / (a Jw 2 — u 2 sin 2 6 - Jw*s 2 - a 2 u 2 sin 2 6 ) cos 6 sin $d0, 

=sM 5 (w3 - c3) - »( wh * - (^ 2 -^ 2 ) f ) } 

when ivs>au', 

and 

= ~ 2 \ I ajw 2 —u 2 sin 2 6 cos dsinOdO—/ Jw 2 s 2 — a 2 u 2 sin 2 6 cos 6 sin 6d6 c , 

when ws <aw . 

These must be multiplied by the chance of relative speed u, as in § 58, and the result is 



cs 






'0 

or, with the notation of S 60 



2ah 2 ft« 2 /2 



/"* co r* c cosec o 

{J c ^(^ (l - COs3a) - e3 y^ l2+ J c 1Z (c 2 -w 2 sm 2 afe- hwi/2 } 
\ / 3 / c 2 — * 



= 2ah? ekC 2 l2 JdAuf 3( 1 _ cos 3 a )_ c 3V-^ 2 /2 + 2a^ 2 g -2 :c0t20 / g 4 cfe e +fa»c«ec*,/2 
VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 22). 7 g 



1038 PROFESSOR TAIT ON THE 

As the value of this expression depends in no way on the length of the free path, it is 
clear that the average energy of all the particles is greater than that of the free particles, 
by an amount which increases rapidly as the length of the free path is diminished. 



APPENDIX. 

A. Coefficient of Restitution less than Unity. 

Let us form again the equations of § 19, assuming e to be the coefficient of restitu- 
tion. We have 



so that 



p ( u '- u )=-T^" ) ( u -v)=-Q(v'-v) > 
P(u'2- u 8)=-^-^(u~v)((2P+Ql-e)u+Q(l+e)v) 
Q(v'«-v«) = ^|^- ) (u-v)(P(l+e)u + (2Q + P(l-e))v) . 

The whole energy lost in the collision is half the sum of these quantities, viz., 

PQ(l-e)* 
» P + Q ^ u vj • 

With the help of the expressions in § 22, we find for the average changes of energy of 
a P and of a Q, respectively, 

1 P(u^ - i?) = - 2 [|p l ^ 2 (2(P/t' - Q/0 + Q(l - e)(h + h)) 

The first term on the right is energy exchanged between the systems ; and, as in the 
case of e= 1, it vanishes when the average energy per particle is the same in the two 
systems. The second term (intrinsically negative for each system) is the energy lost, and is 
always greater for the particles of smaller mass. The average energy lost per collision is 

PQ(l-e 2 ) /l 1\ 

2(P + Q)U" h &/ 

It is easy to make for this case an investigation like that of § 23. But we must 
remember that there is loss of energy by the internal impacts of each system, which must 
be taken into account in the formation of the differential equations. This is easily found 
from the equations just written, by putting Q = P : — but the differential equations 
become more complex than before, and do not seem to give any result of value. [Shortly 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1039 

after Part I. was printed off, Prof. Burnside called my attention to the fact that the 
equations of interchange of energy in § 23 are easily integrable without approximation. 
But the approximate solution in the text suffices for the application made.] 



B. The Law of Distribution of Speed. 

In addition to what is said on this subject in the Introduction to Part II. , it may be 
well to take the enclosed (from Proc. R. S. E., Jan. 30, 1888). 

" The behaviour parallel to y and z (though not the number) of particles whose 
velocity-components are from x to x + dx, must obviously be independent of x, so that 
the density of ' ends ' in the velocity space diagram is of the form 

fix) F(y,*). 

The word I have underlined may be very easily justified. No collisions count, except 
those in which the line of centres is practically perpendicular to x (for the others each 
dismiss a particle from the minority ; and its place is instantly supplied by another, 
which behaves exactly as the first did), and therefore the component of the relative speed 
involved in the collisions which we require to consider depends wholly on y and z motions. 
Also, for the same reason, the frequency of collisions of various kinds (so far as x is con- 
cerned) does not come into question. Thus the y and z speeds, not only in one x layer 
but in all, are entirely independent of x ; though the number of particles in the layer- 
depends on x alone." 

C. Viscosity. 

In my " Reply to Prof. Boltzmann " I promised to give a further approximation to the 
value of the coefficient of Viscosity, by taking account of the alteration of permeability 
of a gas which is caused by (slow) shearing disturbance. I then stated that a rough 
calculation had shown me that the effect would be to change my first, avowedly approxi- 
mate, result by 11 or 12 per cent. only. I now write again the equations of § 36, 
modifying them in conformity with the altered point of view. 

The exponential expression in that section for the number of particles crossing the 
plane of yz, must obviously now be written 

£ ° smOdO/z, 

where v is the velocity relative to the absorbing layer at £, and e also is no longer constant. 

But we have at once 

v = v + B£ sin 6 cos <£ , 
so that the exponent above is 

SGC w 

' (ev + (ev)'Bi; sin 6 cos <f>)d^ . 



1040 PROFESSOR TAIT ON THE 

Thus the differential of the whole y-momentum which comes to unit surface on x = 
from the layer x, x + dx, is 

W^'fl-M ^ 11 ° Z S % ^n cos + BAin Odd . 
4^ \ 2v cost? y\ -r ' j 

Integrating with respect to <f> from to 27r, to x from to oo , and to 6 from to ^, 
and doubling the result, we have 

The first term expresses my former result, viz. 

BPCj 

Sirs 2 Jh ' 
But the whole is 

BPn C ? 4 ve\ 2BP™ fvhv 3 2BPC. 



3 w /" 7 4 ve\ _ 2BPw /X> 3 _ 
Uj^Ke e 2 )~ 15j ~^~loTrs 2 Jh 



The ratio is 2C 3 /5C l = 3-704/4-19 = 0-882. 
It is worthy of remark that the term 



/ 



has the value 

15W7TS 2 ^A 

and that 4/5ths of the C x term are due to e'. 

D. Thermal Conductivity. 

Applying a process, such as that just given, to the expressions in § 39, we find that 
the exponential in the integral for the number of particles must be written 

g 2» 2 = s ( 1— e cc 2 sec 0/2-?; + -^ — ) 

to the required degree of approximation. [Properly, the superior limit of the 9 integra- 
tion should be cos -1 - ; but this introduces quantities of the order a 2 only.] Thus equation 
(1) becomes 

In the same way equation (3) of § 41 becomes 

E= -j /nv&((£+fye-5alv-9al4ev) . 



FOUNDATIONS OF THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. 1041 

Thus equations (1') and (3') of § 42 become, respectively, 

h' P /5 p p \ PC g' 
a ~ Jh 6 6vps\ 2 x ^V 8wphs* ' 
and 

^^/25 \ 3PC 2 a' 5P(V 

* ~ Jh 5 67rs 2 W 2 °^ 3 + ^ 5 / "*" 8 ,rft S 2 " 16 tt/w 2 ' 

Thus we have finally to deal with the new forms of (1") and (3") of § 43, viz. : — 

«=-^0-06-^'0-12, 

Jh? p ph 

E = -^ 5/0 \0-45+' ) ~0-44. 

When similar methods are applied to the diffusion equations, they become hopelessly 
complicated. 



VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 22). 7 T 



( 1043 ) 



XXIII. — On Systems of Solutions of Homogeneous and Central Equations of the nth 
Degree and of two or more Variables ; with a Discussion of the Loci of such 
Equations. By the Hon. Lord M'Laren. (Plates I.-VI.) 



(Read 6th July 1888.) 



1. Principle of Homogeneous or Linear Variation of a 

Homogeneous Function, ..... 1044 

2. Application of the Principle to finding Solutions of 

Homogeneous Equations of one part. (Case I.), . 1045 

3. Solution of Equations of two Homogeneous parts of 

different Degrees. (Case II.), . . . . 1049 

4. Another mode of Solution ; viz., by expressing each 

of the r Variables in terms of r - 1 New Variables, 1050 

5. Solution of certain Homogeneous Equations by the 

introduction of a New Variable. (Case III.), . 1052 

6. S luble Cases of the Homogeneous Function F„(a. , J y,z) 

= 0, 1057 

7. Solution of Homogeneous Equations of Functions 

of the Variables. (Case IV.), .... 1057 

8. To find the Condition under whicli Parallel Sections 

of a given Surface may be similar Curves, . . 1058 

9. Classification and Forms of Curves considered as Sec- 

tions of Surfaces whose Equations are Homogeneous, 1060 

10. Classification of Central Curves of the Form 

F(a;, y)" = A", 1062 

11. Transformation to Secondary Axes — Rule of Signs, . 1064 

12. Diameters in Central Curves of the Fourth Degree, . 1066 



PAGE 

13. Diameters in Central Curves of Higher Degrees, . 1068 

14. Sextic Curves of the Homogeneous Form F(a;, y) 6 = A 6 , 1070 
14a. To find the Equations of the Equiaxial Curves re- 
ferred to Secondary Axes, ..... 1070 

146. Limiting Forms of the Equiaxial Curves, . . 1072 
14c. Form and Variations of the Equiaxial Curves (a) 

and (0), 1073 

lid. Examples of the other Equiaxial Curves, . . 1075 

15. Determination of Contour-Lines of Homogeneous 

Surfaces, 1079 

16. Central Curves whose Equations are of the Form 

F^x, yy = ¥. 2 (x, },)»-?, 1081 

16a. Examples of such Curves (Sixth Degree), . . 1082 

17. Contour- Lines of Surfaces derived from Central 

Curves passing through their Centres, . . 1084 

18. The Wave-Surface, 1085 

19. Curves Symmetrical about One Axis, . . . 1086 
19a. To find a Symmetrical Expression for the Oval of 

Single Symmetry, 1088 

19&. Examples of Curves of Single Symmetry, . . 1089 

20. Parabolic Limiting Forms, 1090 

21. Biradial Coordinates, 1091 



The purpose of the present paper is to ascertain how far it is possible to find, exact 
solutions or values of x, y, &c., in equations between variables, so that the forms of plane 
curves and contour-lines of surfaces may be exactly determined. No approximate 
methods have been admitted, and only those methods have been used which are applicable 
to algebraic equations of every degree and any number of variables. In the examples 
given I have generally selected equations of even degree and even powers of the variables. 
But every such solution evidently includes the solution of the non-central equation of 
half the degree having corresponding terms and equal coefficients. The methods of 
solution employed are founded on the following introductory theorem or principle, which 
may be described as that of Homogeneous or Linear Variation of the quantities. 

The paper, as laid before the Royal Society in July 1888, embraced only the solution 
of homogeneous equations in which one of the quantities was given explicitly in terms of 
the others. The preparation of the paper for the press having been interrupted by my 
absence abroad for a considerable time, I have resumed the investigation from a more 
general point of view. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 7 U 



(ma 



1044 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

1. Principle of Homogeneous or Linear Variation of a Function. 

If F(a, /3, y . . .)" = be a homogeneous function of the n th degree of any number of 
quantities, a, /3, y, . . . ; and if a lt j3 u y u &c., be known values of these quantities satisfy- 
ing the equation, then may another set of values, a 2 , /3 2 , yz, satisfying the equation, be 
found by multiplying or dividing each term by any desired factor, m n . 

Let the function consist of a series of homogeneous terms of powers of the quantities 
a, y8, y, . . . multiplied by coefficients *p x q 1 ... and equated to zero. Let a v fi v y x be 
values satisfying the equation ; which accordingly will be of the form 

«"+p 1 a 1 »- 1 /3 1 +p 2 a 1 »- 1 /3 2 + . . . q P 1 n + q 1 p 1 n - 1 y 1 + q 2 p 1 n - 2 y!+ . . . + r j .<-*- ? P?7i' ? + ... =0; 

where the last term is the generalised term for three quantities. 

To find a new series of values satisfying the equation, we have only to multiply every 
term by the same numerical quantity, m n . The equation is, of course, unaltered in value, 
and is now of the form 

i 1 ) n +2\(ma 1 ) n -\ml3 1 )+p 2 (ma 1 ) n - 2 (m/3) 2 + . . . g ( m A) B + 9i( TO P\)" _1 (w7i) 
+ r,.(ma 1 ) B -*-»(m i 8 1 y , (my 1 )»+ ... -0, 

where the term in the second line is the generalised form of a term resulting from the 
multiplication of the function by m n . 

By writing a 2 for ma,, /3 2 for mfi v y 2 for my v &c, the equation is restored to its 
original form, with a new set of values, a 2 , /3 2 , y 2 , of these indeterminate quantities satisfy- 
ing the equation. Comparing the two sets of values, we find the relation 

« 2 £ 2 72 
«i Pi 7i 

which was to be proved. 

The preceding proof evidently includes the cases of negative, reciprocal, and fractional 
indices. 

In the preceding theorem it is not assumed that all the quantities a, /?, y, . . . 
are variables ; and the proof is evidently the same, whether all the quantities are con- 
ceived as being subject to indefinite variation, or whether some of them are conceived as 
having only certain definite values from which values of the other quantities are to be 
obtained. For example, if a 1 j3 1 are variable coordinates, and y : is a parameter, the set 
of values a v /3 : , y x represents a point on a plane curve of the nth degree having the para- 
meter y x , and the set of values a 2 , /3 2 , y 2 represents a corresponding point on a similar 
curve whose parameter is y 2 . But if the three quantities a, )8, y are all conceived as being 
subject to indefinite variation, y being then a third coordinate, the function represents a 
conical surface of the nth. degree, and the two sets of values then represent corresponding 
points on parallel, and therefore similar, plane sections of this surface. 

Again, certain of the quantities may represent the coordinates of a point on a central 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTEAL EQUATIONS. 1045 

plane curve or central surface, while others of these quantities may represent the 
coordinates of the centre. If now the function represents a central surface whose centre 
is variable in position, we may have seven quantities, whereof one is a parameter, and 
six are variables. When the number of variables exceeds three there must, of course, be 
other relations between the coordinates, otherwise the problem becomes indeterminate. 
In the case supposed, a second equation between the coordinates of the centre and one 
of the coordinates of the surface determines the curve or surface which the centre is 
supposed to describe, and supplies the necessary elements for the solution of the first 
equation. I have introduced this illustration because every homogeneous equation of 
even degree of three or four quantities represents a central curve or central surface 
respectively referred to the centre ; and it is easily seen that, if the origin be changed to 
any point, whether exterior or interior to the curve, the left-hand side of the resulting 
equation is a homogeneous function of the original coordinates, and the coordinates of 
the centre. 

2. Application of the Principle to finding Solutions of Homogeneous Equations 

of one part. (Case I.) 

The most obvious application of the method of homogeneous variation is to the 
exact determination of a series of points on a curve or surface whose equation is given 
in the form of a homogeneous function equated to an arbitrary term. The method, 
however, is purely analytical, and it is not necessary that the quantities should have a 
geometrical interpretation. The arbitrary term is to be expressed as the n th power of 
a number iv, and the equation is then of the form- — 

x n + A 1 x n ' 1 y + A 2 x n - 2 y 2 + . . . +A n y n = w n . 

The quantity to is evidently a parameter, being the value of x when y = 0. It is 
required to find a series of exact values of x and y to the given parameter w. The 
values to be found may be denoted by x u y u x 2 , y 2 . . . Let £ 1} ^ be any values arbitrarily 
assumed; these values are to be inserted in the given function, and the value of the 
parameter computed by summing the terms and extracting the nth. root of the sum. 
The equation formed may be called auxiliary equation (1); and may be written — 

Then by the preceding theorem we have the relation xj^ = y\\y\\ = wjw u which gives 
for the coordinates of the first point (or first set of values of the original equation) 
x 1 = ^ 1 wjw 1 ; y 1 = t) 1 wfw 1 . 

A second auxiliary equation being formed from new assumed values ^ 2 -q 2 , and the 
parameter w 2 computed, we find from these data the coordinates of a second point (or 
second set of values of the original equation), viz., x 2 = £ 2 w/w 2 ; y2 = r) 2 iv/yj 2 , and so on. 
These are true algebraic solutions of the given equation. 



1046 



HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 



This method of finding solutions of indeterminate quantities is hereafter referred to as 
the method of Homogeneous Variation, because all the quantities are varied proportion- 
ately in order to obtain a new series of values. 

Although only two variables, x and y, are here expressed, the explanation of the 
method of solution is intended to cover the case of an equation of three or more variables. 
In order to simplify the illustrations as much as possible, I shall generally suppose two 
variable quantities x and y ; or r cos 6 and r sin 6 ; w is then the parameter or inter- 
cept on the axis of X. It is convenient to take this quantity = unity, which can always 
be done by dividing out. 

In order that the series of points to be found may correspond to equal angular 

intervals, it is best to assume & , . and 7} x . , equal respectively to the cosine and sine 

of an angle. Then x 1 __ j/i... are proportional to the same cosine and sine, and are 

the rectangular coordinates of the curve to the argument $. 

Example 1. 

x i + 2x s y + 3x 2 y 2 + 4>xy 3 + 2y i = w i =l. 

For the sake of clearness, I shall, in this example only, dispense with the use of 
logarithmic tables, and find two values of x and y from auxiliary equations in which the 
assumed values are whole numbers. 

(l) Let £i = l; 171 = 1. The sum of the terms of the auxiliary equation is 12; 

.\w x = 12 1/4 ; x l = g/wi = ^ = y x . 

This may be verified as follows: — Let x x and y x have the values here found. Then 
taking the terms of the equation in their order, 



c4 ~\12W ~12' 2a;32/ ~ 2 (l2w(l2W - 12' 



and so on ; and the terms are as under- 



X* 


2x 3 y 


3x 2 y 2 


4xy 3 


2y* 


1 

12 


2 
12 


3 
12 


4 
12 


2 

12 



Sum of the terms = =~ = 1 > as ** should be. 

(2) Let £ 2 = 1 5 Vz= 2 ; the sum of the terms of the auxiliary equation is 

1+4 + 12 + 32 + 32 = 81; .-. w 2 = 81 1 /* = 3; x 2 = ^w 2 = ^; y 2 = v /w. 2 = ^ 



This solution may be verified in the same way as the preceding without the use of 



logarithms. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1047 

In the next example I shall take the assumed quantities £1,2... 171,2... from the trigono- 
metrical tables; so that log^^logcos X ; log ^ = log sin X ; and so on, and thence 
determine x 1>2 . . y Xt2 ... for parameter = 1. 

Example 2. 

Values of x and y will be found to the arguments, = 20°; = 30°. 
1. Let0 1 = 2O°; £i = cos 20°; 17! = sin 20°; x 1 = ^ 1 /w 1 ; yi = r}ijwi. 



Log cos 20° 
log cos 6 


= 1-9730 
1-8380 

1-7840 
1-7300 

= 1-5341 
10682 

21364 
53410 

= 1-7907 
1-9791 

lo gfi = 
-\ogw 1 

£2 = cos 30 

= 1-9375 
T-6250 

T-5000 
T-3750 

T-6990 
T-3980 

2-7960 
4-9900 

T-5348 
1-9534 

log | 2 = 

— log w 2 

\ogx 2 


= 1-9730 
1-9791 


Nat. numbers. 

|V = 00712 
| 10 05370 

IV 00094 
>; 10 (insensible) 

w 10 = 0-6176 


log cos 8 =1-7840 
log sin 2 +1-0682 


log cos 8 
log cos 10 

Log sin 20° 
log sin 2 


2-8522 
= log |V 

log cos 6 =1-8380 
log sin* + Tl364 


log sin* 
log sin 10 

log w 10 


3-9744 
= log |V 


log w 


log Vl -- 
-logw 1 

30°; x 2 = % 2 /w 2 ; y 2 =rj 
Nat. numbers. 

|V = 00791 
I 1 0-2371 

|V 0-0264 
»; 10 (insensible) 

w w = 03426 


= 1-5341 
1-9791 


2. Let = 30°; 

Log cos 30° 

log cos 6 


1-9939 
'°; 172= sin 

= 1-9375 
1-9534 


1-5550 

2 /w 2 . 

log cos 8 =1-5000 
log sin 2 +1-3980 


log COS 8 
log COS 10 

Log sin 30° 
log sin 2 


2-8980 
= log |V 

log cos 6 T-6250 
log sin* +2-7960 


log sin* 
log sin 10 

log w 10 


24210 
= log |V 


log V) 


log*7 2 = 
log w 2 

logy 2 


= 1-6990 
1-9534 




1-9841 


1-7456 



Resuits/^' 9860 ;^- 3589 ; 

U 2 = -9640; 2/ 2 = -5567 - 
The following independent analytical proof of the general theorem, including its 



1048 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

extension to any number of variable quantities, was communicated to me by Dr Thomas 
Muir after reading the first sketch of this paper : — 

Since x = a, y = b is manifestly a solution of the equation 

A x n + A l x n ~ 1 y + . . . +A n y n = \ci"+A 1 a n - 1 b+ . . . + A n b„, 

=P say, 
then 

_ a _ b 

%— t> y~~ 

Vn Vn 

is a solution of the equation 

A x n +A 1 x n ~ 1 y+ . . . +A n y n = l. 

For, substituting afp*, b/p* for x, y, the left-hand side becomes 

. a", . a n ~ x b , , . b n . p ., 

A . -+A 1 + . . . +A„— ; %.e., ^=1 . 

p p P P 

This proof, as well as that formerly given, is applicable to functions of any number 
of variables. For example, the equation 



has the algebraic solution 



x i +y i + 6y 3 z+7xyz 2 =l , 



a 
x = 



y= 



z = 



^a i +b i +6b 3 c + 7abc 2 
b 

c 
2ja i +b i +6b s c + 7abc' i 



And quite generally we can formulate as follows : — 

If <f> be a homogeneous function of the nth degree in r variables, the equation 



has the algebraic solution 



r\\ j 1^/9 J wo j • • • j vC"rj — -L 



<JC-\ — 



V^( tt l > «2 > • • • » a r) 
Og 

£/0(a! ,a 2 ,...,a r ) 
a, 



VCn — 



JOo 



3~ n 



X r = 



V#»i , a 2 , . . . , Or) 



%/4>(a lt a 2 , . . ., a r ) 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1049 

3. Solution of Equations consisting of two Homogeneous parts of Different 

Degrees. (Case II.) 

These equations represent a class of central curves or surfaces essentially different 
from the preceding. In the case of equations of even degree the curve F n (x, y) = A n 
cannot pass through the centre ; while curves which are of the form F n (x, y) = ¥ n _ p (x, y), 
when reduced to the lowest terms, generally pass through the centre, because their 
equations are satisfied by the values x = ; y = 0. 

Equations of the form F n (x, y) = F n _ P (x, y) are really homogeneous, or, at least, are 
reducible to homogeneous form by division. 

Take, for example, the equation 

Ax b + Exy* = Q(H.x 3 + Ky 3 ). 

By division we have 

Ax 5 +Exy i 



H.x 3 + Ky 



= Q> 



where the left-hand side is homogeneous, and of the 2nd degree. Consequently, by the 
results of the preceding analysis (sections 1 and 2), a solution is 

/ Q(Ha 3 +K6 3 n 
x - a W Aa 5 +Ea¥ I 



*v 



Q(Ha 3 + K& 3 ) 
Aa & + Ea¥ 



where a and b are any quantities whatever. This may be directly verified as follows : — 
Calling the expression under the root-sign <u and substituting, we have 



and 



Hence 



Ax 5 + Exy* = Aa 5 ( Jwf + Ea¥( Jwf 
= (Atf + EaV)(Ja>Y 

Q(Hx 3 +Ky 3 ) = Q(Ha 3 ( Jwf + Kb% Jw) 3 ) 

= Q(Ha 3 +K6 3 )(» 3 . 

Aaf + Exy* (Aa b +Ea¥)( Jwf 
Q(Rx 3 + Ky 3 ) Q(Ha 3 + K& 3 )( Jw) 3 

Aa 5 + Ea¥ 
~Q(Ha 3 +K6 3 ) ' w 

Atf + EaV Q(Ha 3 +K6 3 ) 
~ Q(Ha 3 + Kb 3 ) ' Aa 5 + EaV 

— 1 , as it should be. 
This quasi-extension of the original theorem may be formulated as follows 



1050 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

If be a homogeneous function of the n th degree in r variables, and ^ a homogeneous 
function of the (n— p)' A degree in r variables, the equation 

(pyX-y, X^i • • .,X r ) = \jr\XyX^,. . -,X T ) 

has the solution 



1 V 0(« 1; ...,a r ) 



x - a „/ ^(ai, ••_•._%) 

r V^ a r ) 



x 3 — 



The cases here examined evidently include the following forms : — 

F n (x, y) = Ax n ~ p ; F n (x, y) = Ax r,+p 
and 

F n {x,y) = z", 

where z p is a soluble function of other quantities, whose numerical value can be found 
and stated as a power of z. 

4. Another mode of Solution; viz., by expressing each of the r Variables in terms 

of i—l New Variables. 

(1) Where there are only two variables X and Y, we have the relations Y = Xtan0 ; 
X = Y cotan 6 . from which by substitution and division we may at once write the 
transformed equations of the homogeneous function f(x, y) n = 1 , 

1 +a 1 tan0 + a 2 tan 2 -f . . . =v^ ■ ' ' ^ 

cotan"#+ +a 1 cotan n-1 # +a 2 cotan"" 2 + • • • = y^ • • • (^) 

Supposing a series of values of X to be formed from (1), and tabulated for the argument 
6, then the column of values of Y is found by adding to each value of log X the cor- 
responding log tan 6. 

(2) When there are three or more variables a, /3, y, &c, they may, in like manner, 
be all expressed as functions of one of them, a, and new quantities. For this purpose, 
assume /3 = atan<£ ; y = atani/;, &c, or more generally, (3 = la; y = ma ; 8 = na, &c. (3) 

Substituting these values, and dividing by a", the transformed equation will then 
consist of a series of powers of I, m, n, &c, equated to l/a". Values of a may then be 
directly computed for any arguments or assumed values of I, m, n; and the other 
quantities, f3, y, S, &c, are formed from (3). 

The manner of doing this is shown by the following examples. (1 ) Let the equation be 

x*+xyz 2 +3xYz i +y* = w s = l ( 4 ) 

X is the quantity of which values are to be directly found ; 6 is the angular coordinate in 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1051 

the plane xy ; <f> is the angular coordinate in the plane xz; y = xta,n0 ; z = xtsno.<f) ; and 
the transformed equation is 

x 8 {l + tan 2 atan 2 + 3tan 2 atan^ + tan 8 0} = 1 

.-. - = { 1 -+- tan 2 0tan 2 + 3 tan 2 <9 tan*0 + tan 8 e} 1/8 . 

Suppose we want a series of values of x and y to the argument of tan<£=l or z = x, 
the reduced equation is l/x= {2 + 4tan 2 #} 1/8 , from which the following values are directly 
found : — 



e=°. 


15° 


30° 


45° 


60° 


Log tan 6 


= 1-4281 


1-7614 


00000 


0-2386 


Log tan 2 


= 2-8562 


1-5228 


00000 


0-4772 


Tan 2 


= 00718 


03333 


10000 


3-0000 


4tan 2 + 2 


= 2-2872 


33332 


60000 


140000 


Log(4tan 2 + 2) 


= 0-3593 


0-5227 


07782 


11461 


1/8 = log I/a 


= 00449 


0-0653 


00973 


01433 


Log a; 


= 1-9551 


1-9347 


1-9027 


1-8567 


Log y 


= 13832 


T6961 


1-9027 


00953 


X 


= 0-9018 


0-8604 


0-7993 


07190 


y 


= 02416 


07251 


0-7993 


5-2360 



(2) Let the equation be 

a 10 + /3V<5 3 + a 4 /3Y = l. . - (5) 

fi = ld; y = ma ; B = na; and the transformed equation is 

1 + £ 4 m 3 w 3 + l 3 w? = -r- • 
a 

If it is desired to find values of a and 8 to the arguments 1=1, m=l, the reduced 
equation is 2 + n 3 = l/a 10 [n = tan v.] 



V 


20° 


40° 


60° 


80° 


Log tan 3 t» 


= 1-5611 


1-9238 


0-2386 


07537 


Log tan 3 u 


= 2-6833 


1-7714 


0-7158 


2-2611 


2 + tan 3 u 


= 2-0482 


2-5907 


7-1980 


1844500 


Log (2+tan 3 y) 


= 03113 


04135 


08572 


2-2658 


1/10 = log l/o 


= 003113 


004135 


0-08572 


0-22658 


Log a 


= 1-96887 


T95865 


1-91428 


T-77342 


Log tan v 


= 1-5611 


1-9238 


0-2386 


07537 


Log 8 


= T5300 


T8825 


01529 


05271 


a 


= 09309 


09093 


0-8210 


05934 


8 


= 0-3388 


07630 


1-4220 


3-3660 



An equation consisting of a single homogeneous part may also be reduced to polar 
coordinates and solved for r. If we write r cos 9 for x, and r sin 6 for y, and divide by 
r n , the resulting equation is 

Cos re + A 1 .cos"- 1 0.sin0 + A 2 cos ra - 2 0.sin 2 0± . . . ±sin n = — = -, 
VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 7 X 



1052 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

whence 1/r" is found by summing the terms. But for purposes of computation the 
formulae of the preceding paragraph are preferable, because they contain only half the 
number of trigonometrical quantities that are contained in the polar expression. 

Where there are three variables, and it is desired to obtain values of a radius vector in 
terms of 6 and the spherical angle <f>, the computation may also be simplified by making- 
use of cylindro-polar coordinates. In this system r is the radius vector in the plane of 
XY ; thence x = r cos 6 ; y = r sin 9 ; z = r tan <f>. Each term of x, y, z then contains at the 
most only three trigonometrical quantities to be computed, instead of Jive, as in the 
ordinary spherical system, and the angles 6 and <j> are the same. 

The spherical radius vector, if required, can be afterwards found by the relation, 
spherical radius-vector = rsec</>. The equation of three variables transformed to 
cylindro-polar coordinates is of the form 

cos"0+ JA cos" " 2 0.sin 6 + A x cos" - 3 0.sin 2 + . . . }tan 0+ {cos"- 3 # . sin0+ . . .[ tan 2 ^ 
+ . ■ . + sin"0+ tan"</> = l/r n . 

Examples of solutions effected by transformation to polar and cylindro-polar coordin- 
ates will be given in the sequel. 

5. Solution of certain Homogeneous Equations by the introduction of a New 

Variable. (Case III.) 

It is only in the case of homogeneous equations that the n th root of the arbitrary 
term is a parameter or value of x when y = 0. In all other cases the parameter is 
determined by an equation in x or y (as the case may be), which in the case of the 
higher degrees can only be solved by approximation. Hence the method of homogeneous 
variation is not directly applicable. In applying the principle of homogeneous variation 
to functions which are not homogeneous, we must consider the function of two variables, 
as a particular value of a function of three variables in which z has become unity. Thus, 
if we suppose a surface to be represented by an implicit homogeneous function f(x, y, z), 
a plane section, parallel to the plane xy and at a distance from the origin z = 1, will be 
represented by the heterogeneous equation formed by the disappearance of the quantit}^ z. 

In order to solve an equation of the form u n + u n _ i &c. = 0, we must first restore it to 
the homogeneous form by introducing such powers of z as will make the equation homo- 
geneous, and then endeavour to reduce z to unity by homogeneous variation. 

Consider the two following equations, in which the brackets include terms of the 
same degree in x and y : — 

[x +A l x n -hj±...±A„y"\ +{.x"- 1 + B i a;"- 2 ?/ 2 ±. . . ±B >l . 1 y n - 1 } + -jx" - 2 + &c. } = 0. . . (1) 

j^ + A^-^i. . . ± Am") + l^^+B^-^db. . . ± B„_!,r !}£+ {£"~ 2 + &c.}f + &c. = (2) 

The first form is a thoroughly heterogeneous equation, containing terms of degrees 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1053 

n, Ti—1, n — 2, &c. The second form is a homogeneous surface equation, from which 
(1) may be derived by giving to z the value unity. Suppose £ and rj to be arbitrarily 
assumed quantities, and that we can by any known method find a value of the third 
coordinate £, which will make the equation zero, then, dividing by £", we eliminate £. 
Thus, by division, the second of the above equations becomes 

The quantities outside the brackets are unity, and the quantities inside the brackets con- 
stitute a solution or value of equation (1), where £/£ is a value of x, and iqjl, is a value of 
y, while z as a separate quantity has disappeared. £ may be considered either as a third 
dimension or as a variable parameter. 

Accordingly if £ can be found and the arbitrary equation formed, the solution is at 
once obtained by dividing £ and 77 respectively by £. Let S n represent the numerical 
value of the homogeneous part within the first bracket formed by assuming arbitrary 
quantities £ 17 ; S„_ x is the numerical value of the terms within the second bracket (which 
are all of the degree n—1), and so on, and the equation is 

S B +S B _ 1 f+S„_ 2 ^+S„_ 8 f+S„_4^+&c.=0 .... (3). 

It is easily seen that the possibility of solution does not at all depend on the degree of 
the given equation, but upon the relative degrees of the terms of £, which it is necessary 
to introduce. If the equation consists of only two homogeneous parts, suppose of the 
9th and 3rd degrees, we have a simple equation to determinate £, as in this example 
x 9 +A 1 x s y + . . . =je s +B 1 as 2 2/ + . . . &c, which may be written u 9 = u 3 . By introducing the 
quantity z—\ this becomes 

{x 9 + A 1 x 8 y + ...\ = {x s + B 1 x 2 y + ...}z 5 

. {f + A^ + fec.} 1 / 6 
S {£ s + B l f*i7 + &c.} 1 ' 6 ' 

Then by the introductory theorem we find 

This is the case already considered in section 3. Similarly, if the auxiliary equation in 
£, 7), and £ contains only the first and second powers of £, we have a quadratic equation 
between £ and the sums of the numerical terms of the assumed quantities, whence £ 
may be found, and thence exact solutions of x and y. If the auxiliary equation contains 
£ 2 and £ 4 or £ 3 and £ 6 , we have a quadratic equation to determine £ 2 or £ 3 , whose root may 
then be extracted. Or, finally, there may be a soluble cubic or biquadratic equation in 
£ or some power of £. 

If the equation contains an arbitrary term, this is equivalent to an additional 



1054 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

homogeneous part. The arbitrary term may either be treated as a coefficient or reduced 
to unity by division, and in the auxiliary equation it is replaced by % n in order to form 
a homogeneous function equated to zero. 

The method of this section is essentially the same as is implied in the following : — 

A solution of the equation 

x 5 + 6x*y + 3x i + 5xy z + 2x s + 4h/ 3 = 
is 

_ a 
b 
where K is a root of the equation 

(a 5 + 6a 4 &) + (3a 4 + 5a6 3 )R + (2a 3 + 4& 3 )R 2 = . 

For on substituting we have the left-hand side 

_ a 5 6a 4 6 3a 4 5ab 3 2a 3 46 3 
~R 5+ R 5 + R 4+ ^ 4_ + R3 + R3 

_ a 5 + 6a 4 6 + (3a 4 +5a& 3 )R+ (2a 3 +4& 3 )R 2 
R 5 

~R 5 

= 0, as it should be. 
And generally — 
If (p n (x, y) denote a homogeneous equation of the n th degree, the equation 

<t>n{x, y)+<p n -i(x, y)+ • • • +4>i{x, y)+<po(x,y)=0 

has for solution 

a 

x =n 

b 

where R is a root of the equation 

0„(a, b) + 'R ( p n _ 1 (a, b) + W<p n _ 2 (a, b)+ . . . +R"- 1 1 (a, b) + BT<p (a > b)=--0. 

In the case of a heterogeneous function of three variables, there is a choice of four 
solutions. (1) A quantity P may be introduced which will make the equation homo- 
geneous as a whole ; and the equation may then be solved for P by treating the arbi- 
trarily assumed quantities, £ rj, £, as known quantities. Then, dividing by P", values 
of x, y, z are found for P= 1. (2, 3, and 4) Any one of the quantities (say z) may be 
assumed as constant during the operation, or z = a and a quantity P is then to be intro- 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1055 

duced which will make the equation a homogeneous function of P and the other two 
quantities, x and y. Then dividing by P n , x and y are found for z = a ; P = 1. In this 
way a series of values of x and y may be found to any argument z. The choice of the 
method will of course be determined by the possibility of solving the equation in P. 
Unless the degree of the equation is very high, or the terms very numerous, it will 
generally be found that an equation can be formed from which P may be determined, 
and the corresponding values of x, y, and z deduced by homogeneous variation. 

As in the case of plane curves, we see that in the case of surfaces also, any surface 
may be expressed as a homogeneous equation of the three variables and the intercept P 
on one of the axes. Also, any function of identical form, with a different value of P, is 
a similar surface. 

The method is evidently capable of extension to equations of any number of unknown 
quantities. 

There are two distinct geometrical interpretations of the processes here given, 
according as we consider the new quantity z as being in a different plane from x, y, or iu 
the same plane. 

(1) In the former case z is a third coordinate, and the 3-dimensional homogeneous 
equation y (a?, y,z) = always and necessarily represents a conical surface. This maybe 
proved (without drawing on the methods of the differential calculus) by transforming the 
equation to cylindrical coordinates. XY is the reference plane in which r and 6 are 
measured ; z is then perpendicular to that plane. Then writing r cos for x, r sin 6 for 
y, we have a homogeneous equation in r and z with trigonometrical coefficients. Accord- 
ingly if r and z be varied, while 6 remains unchanged, we have by the introductory 
proposition r^z x = r 2 /z 2 = r 3 /z 3 , &c. This can only be true if r and z are coordinates of the 
same generating line, which of course lies in a plane passing through the axis of z and 
making the angle 6 with the plane XZ. More simply, as the result of the transformation 
to cylindrical coordinates is to form a homogeneous function, f(r. z) = 0, this is known to 
be the equation of two right lines, and the surface is then shown to be made up of 
generating lines passing through the origin, which is the definition of a conical 
surface. 

In order that the equation f(x, y,z) = may have real solutions, the highest power of 
one of the quantities must be negative ; and it is easy to see that the homogeneous func- 
tion of the n th degree,f(x,y,z) = is the asymptotic cone of all the concentric and similar 
surfaces which can be found by equating the same function to an arbitrary term P". It 
is in fact the limiting form of this series of concentric and similar surfaces when the 
parameter P vanishes. 

(2) I began by observing that we might conceive the quantity z (which was intro- 
duced for the purpose of rendering the equation to be solved homogeneous) as being 
either in a different plane from x and y, or in the same plane. If it is considered as 
being in the same plane, it is the parameter of the non-homogeneous curve, and may be 
denoted by P. The proof is as follows : — Compare the two subjoined equations, in which 



1056 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

the original heterogeneous equations xy, £77, have been made homogeneous by introducing 
supplementary powers of P and II, 

As the equations are homogeneous and identical in form, they represent similar 
curves ; and according to the fundamental theorem of this paper the one form may be 
derived from the other by multiplying every term by a constant, that is by (P/IT) (i . 
Hence x, y, and P are obtained from £ 77, and II by multiplying each by the factor P/IT. 
This can only be true if P and IT are the parameters or the same multiple of parameters 
of the respective curves. 

It may occur as a difficulty that in the case of heterogeneous curves, the quantity P 
does not correspond to the value x of x when y is equated to zero. But P can easily be 
shown to be proportional to x . For suppose y and 17 in the two curves of the example 
equated to zero, the equations are then of the form 

a£ + Ba£ _1 P + Caf- 2 P 2 =F =F = P" 

H + B^n + c^- 2 n 2 TT=ff. 

Dividing by the highest powers of P and II, we have 

t) +b (tv +g W =f=f=1 

Hence by the known law of expansions, x jY = £ /U, or the quantities P and II of similar 
curves have a constant ratio to the intercepts x £ . They are therefore virtual parameters. 

(3) The case of a homogeneous equation of the n th degree equated to a term Z" or P n , 
with which the paper commences, is now seen to be merely an explicit form of the general 
conical or parametral equation, f (x, y, z) = 0. If the explicit term be considered as 
a third coordinate (z), the conical surface is referred to a plane of symmetry, xy, and 
an axis of symmetry z. In the implicit function the projections of the similar parallel 
sections in the plane xy are neither similar nor symmetrical ; and the similar sections 
are only found by taking z into account. 

So with the implicit function considered as of three quantities in one plane. The 
parameter, P, is evidently not the principal parameter of the curve, but is the value of 
the intercept on the axis of x in the system of axes proposed. 

From this investigation we see that any plane curve whatever may be expressed as a 
homogeneous function of rectangular coordinates and the intercept on one of the axes. 
When so expressed, it is a similar and similarly situated curve with respect to any other 
curve expressed as the same function with a different value of P. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1057 

6. Soluble Cases of the Homogeneous Function f (x, y, zY = Q. 

This function, as has been observed, represents a conical surface, being the asymptotic 
cone of all the concentric and similar surfaces that can be formed by equating the same 
function of x, y, z, to different arbitrary terms. 

Unless the equation contains a large number of terms, it can in general be solved by 
taking arbitrary values of those two quantities which are most involved, and solving for 
the one which is least involved. 

These solutions represent points on the conical surface, and if it is desired to obtain 
such solutions in series, so as to represent a plane section or curve, they may be reduced 
by division to the argument x=l, y=l, or 2=1 as desired. It is only necessary to 
tabulate one such series ; because the surface is conical, and values of y and z may be 
obtained to any other argument x = a, by merely multiplying the tabular values of y and 
2 by a. Consider, for example, the equation of a homogeneous surface of this form, 

x s + Axhf + Bx s z 3 + Cx 2 z° + Cy 2 z 6 + By 5 z 3 + Axhf + y s = 0. 

Here the equation is symmetrical in x and y, but contains no powers of z except the 6th 
and the 3rd. Accordingly, we may form an equation by assuming values x t and y lt and 
then solving the quadratic equation in z 3 , the root of which, being extracted, is a solution. 
That is to say, the values x lt y x , and z x thus found satisfy the equation. 

7. Solution of Homogeneous Equations of Functions of the Variables. (Case IV.) 

Assume 

Vi = ax p +by q + c ; v 2 = dx p + ey 9 +f; v 3 = .... 

Any homogeneous expression in v x v 2 . . . equated to an arbitrary term, or to another 
homogeneous expression in v x v 2 ... of a different degree, can be solved by the methods 
previously given. Values of v Y v 2 . . . being first found, we have then two simple equa- 
tions for determining x p and y q in terms of these values, whence x and y are found. 

The original equation is of course heterogeneous when the quantities ax p + by q + c, &c, 
are substituted in place of v, &c; and by means of this new application of the funda- 
mental theorem, an endless variety of heterogeneous equations may be formed and 
solutions in series obtained. It is evidently a condition of the possibility of solving such 
equations that the number of factors v x v 3i &c, shall not exceed the number of constituent 
quantities, x, y, &c, of which values are to be found. 

If the indices p, q, &c, are even, the curve or surface is central; but the converse 
does not necessarily hold. Thus v x = ax + b ; v 2 = cy + d, gives a central curve from an 
excentric origin, of which PL VI. figs. 5 and 6 are illustrations. If one of the quantities, 
t'i, be taken — a+ Jx the curve will only have single symmetry. 

If we take v\ = x 2 + z 2 ; vl = y 2 + z 2 , thus a series of values of x and y may be found 
to an invariable value of z, and the series of points so determined will trace out one or 



1058 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

more contour lines of the homogeneous surface in x, y, z, which is represented by the 
equation. Examples of these are given in the sequel. 

Other applications of the combination of soluble functions of x and y, or r and 0, 
will readily suggest themselves. The following may suffice as illustrations : — 

(1) Let the equation consist of powers of quantities (x 2 + y 2 ) and (x 2 — y 2 ) as 

(x 2 +y 2 ) n + A 1 (x 2 +y 2 ) n - 1 + A 2 (x 2 + y 2 ) n - 2 + + • - . = A n (x 2 -y 2 y . 

This is equivalent to 

r 2 +A 1 r 2re - 2 +A 2 r 2 "- 4 ++. . . = r**co8»'2fi . A„ , 

whereby is determined in terms of r, and thence x and y. 

(2) (x l +y m ) n + A 1 (x l +y m ) n - 1 +A 2 (x l +y m ) n - 2 + + = A n (x'-y m )p . 

Take ii l = x l ; v 2 = y m ; and solve the resulting equation in u and v, which is of the above 
form. Then u and v are found from r and 0, whence x and y are determined. 

(3) This solution is evidently capable of extension to any function in the form on 
the left side of the sign of equality, where the quantity on the right side can be 
expressed as the power of a cosine or sine of a multiple of 0, or a soluble function of 
such a sine or cosine. In these equations each term is a homogeneous function, and the 
solution depends partly on this circumstance. 

(4) If the right-hand term consists of a power of x alone or of y alone, the equation 
is solved by writing r p coa p for x p , or r p sin p for y p . 

(5) If the left side of the equation consists of powers of the quantity (x l — y m ), and 
the right side of a single term x p or y q , or (x l + y m ) p solutions of r can be found to the 
argument 0, and thence u x v 2 and xy are similarly found. 

8. To find the Condition under which parallel Sections of a given Surface may be 

similar Curves. 

The condition is evidently fulfilled if one of the quantities x, y, z be given explicitly 
in the equation. The surface may be conceived as traced by the motion of a generating 
curve controlled by a guiding curve. 

Suppose the generating curve to be a homogeneous function of x, y, equated 
to a function of z only. Then, as the sections parallel to XY are to be similar 
curves, the generating curve must move parallel to itself with varying parameter, 
and so as always to touch a guiding curve in the place XZ. Let the equation of the 
guiding curve be of the form 

x n - z n ± B^i 1 ± B 2 z n ± 2 d= . • • + B^iP = . 

Then the equations of the generating and guiding curves are 

f(xy) = x" + A 1 x n - 1 y+A 2 x n - 2 y 2 ^=FA„y n =p .... (1). 
f( x y) = x s " - z y " ± B^"* 1 ± . . . + B h z^p = . . . . (2). 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1059 

In equations (1) and (2) p is the variable parameter of the section parallel to xy, 
and is evidently the ordinate in the principal plane xz. Hence, x y = p; x m = p n =f(xy). 

Also the value of z in the two sections is the same. 

Substituting in (2) the value of x above found, we have for the equation of the 
surface 

x n + A 1 x n ' 1 y + A 2 af - Y =F =F Ky n = z n T B^"-' ± . . . + B n z n±p ; 

whence values of x and y can be found by homogeneous variation to any argument z. 
For, we have only to suppose z constant, and to state the sum of the terms of z as an 
arbitrary quantity in the form P re , and the problem is reduced to that of the introductory 
proposition. 

In the example given, the plane XY is a plane of symmetry, and the axis z is an axis 
of symmetry ; but these considerations are insufficient to determine similar parallel 
sections unless the quantities x and y are combined homogeneously. It is easy to see 
that in the example given the sections parallel to XZ and YZ are not similar, because 
they are neither homogeneous functions of the respective pairs of variables, nor of these 
quantities and the parameter. 

On trial it will be found that no other generating curve, except a homogeneous curve, 
gives similar parallel sections. If possible, let the sections of the unknown surface taken 
parallel to the following symmetrical equation be similar curves 

x n + A. 1 x n ~ 2 f+ A 2 af-"V =F =FA 2 ccy- 4 + A 1 x 2 y n ~ 2 +y n = P* . 

In order that the sections parallel to the plane of xy may be similar, their equations 
must be homogeneous functions of x, y and P, as has been proved. Hence the condition 
is satisfied by substituting z = P or f(z) = Y. 

It thus appears that a central surface, other than a conical surface, will not furnish 
sections parallel to xy which are similar curves, unless the third quantity, z, be given 
explicitly, so that the terms of x and y alone constitute a homogeneous equation. In 
treating of equations in this perfectly general form, one is apprehensive of some possible 
exception or flaw in the demonstration ; I have accordingly taken pains to verify this 
conclusion, by endeavouring to find values of x and y from the surfaces generated by 
various non-homogeneous curves, choosing the most symmetrical forms referred to con- 
jugate axes as being those which were most likely to give results. 

In every instance the values of x and y, found on the assumption that the parallel 
sections were similar, failed to satisfy the original equation, although they must 
necessarily have done so had the hypothesis been correct. 

I consider it then demonstrable that the sections of homogeneous surfaces are only 
similar curves when the sections are homogeneous functions of x and y equated to powers 
of z uncombined with x or y. In other words, the homogeneous function must be of the 
form f(x, y) =f(z, P) ; otherwise parallel sections will be dissimilar. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. fao. 23). 7 Y 



1060 HON. LOED M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

9. Classification and Forms of Curves considered as Sections of Surfaces whose 

Equations are Homogeneous. 

In this chapter I do not enter on the question of the singularities of curves, a theme 
which has already been the subject of much learned investigation. My purpose is (1) 
to discover the different elementary and symmetrical forms of the curves of a given 
degree, which may be considered as the sections of a homogeneous surface parallel to its 
principal planes ; and (2) from these elementary forms to show how by variation of the 
unknown quantities corresponding types of unsymmetrical curves of the n th or given 
degree may be obtained, and the surfaces traced in series of contour-lines. 

I ought here to point out that the motive of this investigation is somewhat different 
from that of Mr Frost's valuable work on Curve Tracing. 

In a treatise on Curve-Tracing in general, the exact determination of the locus of the 
curve is of course unattainable, and only approximate methods are used. 

In the present paper, only those curves are considered whose loci can be exactly 
traced, by solving these equations rigorously for successive positions of x and y. In the 
diagrams, which are photographic reductions of the original tracings on diagram-paper, 
the error at any point ought not to exceed 7 ^ of an inch. 

It is perhaps unnecessary to prove that every homogeneous equation of three 
variables represents a surface symmetrical about three principal axes of symmetry, which 
it is convenient to consider as placed perpendicularly to one another. This follows from 
the consideration that when the homogeneous equation is transformed to polar coor- 
dinates, it contains only the highest power of r, which in the case of a curve of even 
degree has always equal positive and negative roots. In the case of curves of uneven 
degree, the same results are obtained by considering the sign of the arbitrary term 
indeterminate, — as it evidently ought to be, because by so treating it, we obtain from 
the equations of uneven degrees forms which are strictly analogous to those of the 
nearest even degrees. 

This being premised, if in the surface represented by the given homogeneous equa- 
tion we take for the axis of Z, the direction of the radius vector of maximum length ; 
and if the surface be referred to this axis Z and to a central plane perpendicular to Z in 
which angles are denoted by 6, then for every value of 6 and <f> there are four equal 
values of r corresponding to the four permutations of the positive and negative values of 
d and </> and also other four formed from n - 6 and <f>. Hence, for any plane through the 
axis of Z, there are four equal values of r, and the curve is symmetrical about Z and the 
diameter in the plane XY. By transforming to an axis X coinciding with the maximum 
radius vector of the central plane and a plane perpendicular to it, similar conclusions 
are obtained for all diametral sections through X, and also for all diametral sections 
through Y, the line of intersection of the first and second reference planes. Thus the 
symmetry of the surface with reference to three principal planes and their intersections 
is established. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1061 

A homogeneous surface may have more than one set of axes of symmetry. Some 
of these may be conjugate diameters meeting the surface at finite points, and some of 
them may be asymptotic lines. 

In a central equation the axes of reference are asymptotic lines, if the equation wants 
the highest powers of the three variables ; because then, dividing the equation by the 
lowest power of any of the variables, suppose x p , we find for the values, y = 0, x=0, the 
corresponding value z — A/af = oo . 

When a homogeneous central surface is referred to axes of symmetry, its equation 
must consist either entirely of terms of even powers of each variable z, x or y, or entirely of 
terms of uneven powers of the same variable ; because then only will the value of the term 
be unaltered when x is changed to —x. or y is changed to —y. It is of course only in 
curves of even degree that x and y are both even or both uneven, and therefore curves 
of uneven degree have in general only single symmetry unless the sign of the arbitrary 
term is treated as indeterminate. Accordingly, 

1. If the equation of a homogeneous surface is of uneven degree, and consists of 
terms of even powers of x and uneven powers of y, the axes of reference are asymptotic 
lines. 

2. If the homogeneous surface equation, being of uneven degree, consists of terms 
of uneven powers of the variables, the axes of reference coincide with finite conjugate 
diameters ; but this condition can only be fulfilled if the equation is of the form — 

where the sign A" is indeterminate. 

3. Again, if the equation of a homogeneous surface be of even degree, and consists 
entirely of terms of uneven powers of the variables, the axes of reference are asymptotic 
lines. 

4. If the equation being of even degree consists of terms of even powers of the 
variables, the axes of reference coincide with finite conjugate diameters, unless the 
highest powers of the variables are awanting. 

5. If, in any of these cases, the surface is expressed by a symmetrical equation, — 
that is, if the equation consists of pairs of homologous terms, the signs in all the pairs 
being either like or unlike, — the three axes are equal ; and the surface is also sym- 
metrical about six secondary conjugate axes, which bisect the angles between each pair of 
the first set. Moreover, there are two planes through the axis of Z and a secondary axis 
lying between the axes X and Y, which are planes of symmetry ; and two for each similar 
combination ; that is, six planes of symmetry in addition to those originally given. 

6. If the equation be of the form f n (x/a, yjb, z/c) = 1, and be a symmetrical function 
of these ratios, the surface will of course .be a " 3-dimensional projection," or homo- 
geneous transformation of the corresponding function of x, y, z. It is evident from 
known principles that all lines and planes of rectangular symmetry will be projected into 
lines and planes of oblique symmetry ; and the secondary planes and lines will bisect 



1062 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

those parallel to conjugate planes and lines, but will not bisect the angles between the 
principal diameters and principal planes. 

7. Paragraphs 1, 2, 3, and 4 may be applied to plane curves by suppressing the 
element Z ; 6 also applies to plane curves, and it will be shown that the inclination of 
the secondary axis, x, to the principal axis, X, is given by the relation, tan 6 = bja. In 
the further discussion of the subject I shall use the term " Diametral Equation " to 
express the equation of a curve when referred to axes of symmetry. If an equation 
containing only even powers of the variables x and y be also a symmetrical expression, 
the curve has fourfold symmetry, because the symmetrical form of the equation shows that 
the axes of reference are equally inclined to a second pair of conjugate axes. There are 
then eight points at which the value of R is either a maximum or a minimum. This is 
a property which is not lost by projection. A Symmetrical Diametral Equation is an 
equation which is itself symmetrical ; where therefore the curve is equiaxial and has 
fourfold symmetry. 



10. Classification of Central Curves of the Form ¥(x, y) n = A". 

A central function of two variables equated to an arbitary term may be either 
homogeneous or heterogeneous. In the first case, the equation may represent either 
a central section of the general homogeneous surface, or a section taken parallel to a 
principal plane of any homogeneous surface whose equation contains only the highest 
power of Z. In the second case, the equation represents a section taken parallel to a 
principal plane of the general homogeneous surface. Reference is made on this point 
to the preceding part of the paper. 

If we begin by considering homogeneous symmetrical forms, or forms which are the 
projections of these, it is evident that the equations must be composed by the multipli- 
cation of factors of the forms, 



(x , y\ v . (& _,_ 2/ 2 Y ■ ( xn + y"Y 

\ab) ' V W ' "* \«" b n ) ' 



The number of possible symmetrical equations is, however, very much less than the 
possible permutations of such factors ; and it is not difficult to see that the required 
number is that of the permutations of the positive and negative signs in a symmetrical 
equation containing only even, or only uneven powers of x or y. From the preceding 
remarks it is seen that a diametral symmetrical equation represents a curve which has 
two pairs of conjugate axes, each axis bisecting the angles between the axes of the other 
pair ; and that such axes are either asymptotes or finite conj ugate diameters. 

(1) Oval Forms. — If the given equation is homogeneous, and if the four axes of 
symmetry coincide with finite diameters, the equiaxial curve is generally a symmetrical 
oval entirely concave to the centre. In this species, if the original equation consists of 
terms of even powers, the equation of the curve when transformed to secondary axes as 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1063 

axes of reference, consists also of even powers of the variables. In this type of curve, 
when referred to either pair of conjugate axes, all the terms of the variables are positive. 
It will presently be seen that where some of the homologous pairs of terms are positive 
and some are negative, the curve may be an inflexional oval of double symmetry, 
passing into an inflexional hyperbolic for certain values of the coefficients. 

(2) Hyperbolic Forms. — If the axes consist of a pair of finite diameters and a pair of 
asymptotes, the curve consists of two or more infinite branches symmetrically placed, 
which may be either all equal or of two sets. These may be termed continuous or 
discontinuous hyperbolics, according as the branches are all real, or consist of real 
and imaginary (or conjugate) branches in alternate order. If in each pair of homologous 
terms the signs are unlike, the branches are entirely convex to the centre, the inflexional 
hyperbolic being represented by an equation of pairs of homologous terms, some of 
which pairs are positive and some negative, or of unlike signs. 

All equiaxial curves, whether of the first or the second class, complete their 
phases within a quadrant. In curves of the second class, the secondary axes, although 
asymptotic, are true diameters, because the form of the equation shows that each asymptote 
bisects all ordinates drawn parallel to the other ; that is, it bisects the intercepts made by 
two adjacent branches, which may be either both real, or one of them real and the other 
conjugate. 

(3) Projections of Equiaxial Forms. — By writing xja for x and y/b for y in any 
homogeneous equiaxial equation, the equation of the projection of the equiaxial curve is 
formed. The curves of the series which may be formed by projection have the same 
general resemblance to the primitive equiaxial forms that ellipses and common hyperbolas 
have to the primitive forms of the circle and the equilateral hyperbola. 

(4) Heterogeneous Central Equations. — Every equation of even degree, and contain- 
ing only even powers of the variables (although not homogeneous), represents a central 
curve ; and if the equation be a symmetrical expression, the curve is equiaxial. I shall 
here only consider those heterogeneous central forms which represent sections of the 
symmetrical homogeneous surface equation. 

It has been pointed out that every heterogeneous central expression represents a 
section of a homogeneous and central surface taken parallel to a principal plane. There 
is then no specific difference between homogeneous and heterogeneous central curves 
pertaining to the same surface. The highest homogeneous part of the equation is the 
limiting equatorial section, where the terms compounded with Z disappear, and the 
general form of the curve depends solely on the highest homogeneous part of its 
equation. 

(5) With regard to those curves whose equations are not symmetrical functions of 
x and y, or xja and y/b, it is in general not possible to find secondary axes to these. 
But the curves of unsymmetrical expression are assimilated to those whose equations 
are symmetrical by the Kule of Signs, which will presently be deduced, and their traces, 
computed by the homogeneous method, prove that they follow the same classification. 



1064 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

(6) The inclination of the asymptotes of a heterogeneous central curve is always the 
same as the inclination of the asymptotes of the curve represented by its highest homo- 
geneous part. Because, if we transform to polar coordinates, and divide the polar 
equation by r n , the resulting equation is of the form — 

F (cos 6, sin 6f + F^cos 6, sin 8) n - 2 .- 2 + F 2 (cos d, sin 6f ~ i . \ . . . = \ . 

Now, r can only become infinite when F (cos 9, sin 6) n = 0. 

But this is also the condition for r becoming infinite when the equation is reduced 
to its highest homogeneous part. 

It follows that for all parallel sections of a central surface the inclination of the 
asymptotes to the axis of symmetry of the section is the same, and it is evident that all 
such asymptotes lie in two intersecting planes. 

(7) In the case of the homogeneous central equations with an arbitrary term, it is 
evident that the curve cannot pass through the centre. 



11. Transformation to Secondary Axes — Rule of Signs. 

A symmetrical equation is evidently equiaxial ; that is, the intercepts on the axes of 
reference are equal. 

If a diametral symmetrical equation be transformed to secondary axes (bisecting the 
angles between the primary), the secondary axes are also diametral and symmetrical, 
and the curve consists of eight equal and similar segments. This might be inferred from 
general considerations as to symmetry, but it is desirable to prove it analytically. It 
may be here convenient to transcribe certain known formulas of transformation of axes 
(with unchanged origin) of which I am to make use. If 6 be the inclination of X to x — 

X = xcos$ — i/sin 6 Y = xsmd + y cos0 . . . . (1) 

X = (cc-2/)cos0 Y = (x + y)sxaQ (2) 

X = (x-y)jl Y=(x+y)Jh (3) 

(1) Is the formula for transformation in the same plane from any system of rectan- 
gular coordinates to any other rectangular system. 

(2) Is the formula for transformation to symmetrical axes ; i.e., axes equally inclined 
to the original rectangular axes. 

(3) Is the formula for transformation to axes which are at once symmetrical and 
rectangular, and which accordingly bisect the angles between the original rectangular 
axes ; whence, cos 6 = sin 9 = J\ . 

In order to prove that a symmetrical diametral equation is of the same form when 
transformed to secondary axes, it is only necessary to write the generalised form of the 
expression in lines and columns. As the original axes are always supposed rectangular, 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1065 

tbe transformation to secondary axes is effected by substituting in every term the values 
y/l{x-y) for X and */% {x + y) for Y, and expanding. Let A p {X n ~ p Y p + X p Y n ~ p } be any 
pair of homologous terms ; their equivalent in the transformed equation is 

(^A P {(x-yr-P{x + yy> + (x- y )p(x + yy-P\ . . . (4). 

Expanding the first term within the bracket in columns, the coefficients are — 

i+ j, +£ ^^i + P .(P-i)(y-2) +&c . 

f) (p — 1) 

— (n— p) — (n— p)xp — (n— p)x- i. 9 — - — &c. 

(n — p)(n — p — 1) (n — p)(n — p — 1) , „ ,_. 

+ 12 + 12 x P+ kc ( 5 )« 

The coefficients of the expansion of the second term within the brackets are — 

i_ „ y(j?-l) p.(p-l)(p-2) 

1 -i- 12 1.2.3 "*" ' ' • ■ ■ w 

P (p — 1) 
+ (n— p) — (n— p)xp + {n— p)x 1 ~ * ~ — 

, (n-p)(n-p-l) (n-p)(n-p-l) ^^ , 
■+■ 1 2 1.2 x ^" 1 " ' 

where in the first set of terms the sign x is used to separate the factors derived from the 
expansion of (x—y) n ~ p from those derived from the expansion (x + y) p , and similarly in 
the second set of terms. 

The quantity in the first column (always unity) is the coefficient of x n in the trans- 
formed equation. The sum of the quantities in the second column is the coefficient of 
x n_1 y in the transformed equation, and so on. We see that the expansion of the second 
term of the pair is the same as that of the first term, except that in the second, fourth, 
and every other alternate column, the signs + and — are interchanged, and therefore 
the sums of these columns in the two expansions is zero. If the pair of homologous 
terms have contrary signs, then in the expansion the sum of the first, third, &c, columns 
is zero. From this analysis is derived the following abstract of results, hereafter referred 
to as the Rule of Signs. 

1. From the mode of formation of the transformed equation it is always symmetrical 
if the original equation is symmetrical. 

2. If in the original equation the terms constituting a symmetrical pair are of even 
degree and have like signs, i.e., both positive or both negative, then in the expansion of 
these terms in the transformed equation the sum of the partial coefficients is zero for all 
terms of uneven potvers. 

3. If in the original equation the terms constituting a symmetrical pair are of even 



10G6 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

degree with unlike signs, then in the expansion of these terms in the transformed equation 
the sum of the partial coefficients is zero for all terms of even 'powers. 

4. If the sum of the indices in each term be uneven, then the expansion consists of a 
homogeneous expression containing only the even powers of one of the variables, and the 
uneven powers of the other variable. In my notation, if the terms are both positive, the 
transformed expression will consist of even powers of y and uneven powers of x. 

5. If we consider these equations only to be symmetrical where the terms of all the 
homologous pairs have like signs, or where for all homologous pairs the terms have unlike 
signs, then in the complete expansion of the transformed symmetrical equation of even 
degree, the sum of the partial coefficients is zero for uneven powers in the first case, 
and is zero for even powers in the second case ; in other words, if in the original equa- 
tion, being of even degree, the homologous terms have like signs, the equation of the 
curve, when referred to secondary axes, consists entirely of terms of even powers. If in 
the original equation the homologous terms have contrary signs, the equation of the same 
curve, when referred to secondary axes, consists entirely of terms of uneven powers. 
These results are independent of the degree of the curve, and it will hereafter be shown 
that they are applicable to the projection of any symmetrical equation obtained by 
writing x/a for x and y/b for y (page 1069). Thus from the order of the signs of any 
symmetrical equation it is immediately known to which of the previously named classes 
the equation belongs, i.e., whether the curve represented is elliptic, hyperbolic, or 
inflexional. 

6. These results are evidently true for any diametral, symmetrical equation, 
although not homogeneous, because it is only necessary to the proof that the equation 
should consist entirely of even or entirely of uneven terms. 

12. Diameters in Central Curves of the Fourth Degree. 

I shall now give a proof that every central curve of the fourth degree has two pairs of 
axes of symmetry, and in general only two such pairs. 
(1) Let the equation be homogeneous, or of the form 

Asd i + 'Bx' i y i + Cy*=l (1). 

To prove that in general the curve has not a pair of conjugate axes equally 
inclined to a given line. Let the equation be referred to the given line and an axis 
perpendicular to that line. It may then be written 

Dx^Exhj + FxY+Gxy^liy^l (2). 

If we now transform to axes equally inclined to the line by formula (2) p. 1064, it will be 
seen whether the unknown angle 6 can be determined so as to make the uneven terms of 
the resulting equation disappear, so that the resulting equation should be one referred to 
conjugate axes. To this effect we are to make the x of equation (2) = (x — y) cosfl, and 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1067 

the y of equation (2) = (x + y).sin 6, and expand in lines and columns. The expansion 
of the first term of (2) forms the first line, that of the second term is the second line, 

and so on. 

x i x 3 y x 2 y 2 xy % y* 



Term 1 {1 -4 +6 -4 +1}Dcos0 

Term 1 {1-2 + 2 -1 } E.cos 3 sin 6 

Term 3 {1 -2 +1 } F. cos 2 sin 2 

Term 4 {1+2 -2 -1 } G. cos 6 sin 3 

Term 5 {1 +4 +6 +4 +l}H.sin0. 

The coefficients of the new equation are of course the numerical quantities multiplied by 
the quantities outside the brackets. The two uneven terms in the new equations are 

accordingly 

{ - 4D cos 6 - 2E cos 3 6 sin 6 + 2G cos 6 sin 3 6 + 4H sin B}x*y , 
and 

{ - 4D cos + 2E cos 3 sin 6- 2G cos 6 sin 3 + 4H sin 6}xy s . 

The coefficient of x 3 y cannot be changed into that of xy* by interchanging the signs 
+ and — . Hence a value of 6 which makes the term x*y disappear will not in general 
make the term xy 3 disappear. In order that both terms may disappear, we must have 
D = H; E = G; cos = sin 0. Hence the condition of the existence of a pair of conjugate 
axes equally inclined to the axes of (2) is that the equation (2) be symmetrical. The 
conjugate diameters thus found are evidently the principal axes of symmetry of the 
curve. 

If in equation (2) the second and fourth terms are supposed to be wanting, so that 
the curve is already referred to its principal axes of symmetry, then in the new equation 
the two uneven terms will be 

{-4Dcos0 + 4Hsin0}:z 3 2/ and { -4Dcos0 + 4Hsin#}a;;i/ 3 . 

Their coefficients are identical, and the value, tan 6 = D/H, will reduce both terms to zero, 
leaving an equation consisting of even powers, and therefore referred to conjugate 
diameters. The diameters thus found are the secondary axes of the curve ; and the 
relation, tan 6 = D/H shows that they are the diagonals of the circumscribing parallelogram 
whose sides are parallel to the principal axes. When the highest power of y is negative, 
a real solution is impossible, and the diagonals in question are the asymptotes of the 
hyperbolic curve of the fourth degree. These results might have been found directly by 
considering that every quartic homogeneous equation of even powers is necessarily a 
projection of an equiaxial form. Because the given equation, when referred to conjugate 
axes, is of the form 

S+^y+U=i. 



a 



We have then only to take P =pa 2 b 2 , or P/a 2 6 2 =p, in order to obtain the equation in 
projection form. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 7 Z 



1068 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

(2) Where the central equation (being of the 4th degree) also contains terms of the 
2nd degree P(x 2 + y 2 + xy) the terra in xy disappears by transformation, and the trans- 
formed expression consists entirely of even powers. The new axes are accordingly 
conjugate axes. 

More generally an equation of any even degree, consisting of the highest terms of x 
and y, and of one other term of even powers, may, in like manner, be immediately 
reduced to the projection of an equiaxial curve. Such a projection always has a pair of 
secondary axes, which are the diagonals of the circumscribing parallelogram. 



13. Diameters in Central Curves of Higher Degrees. 

For an equation of a degree higher than the fourth, secondary conjugate axes cannot 
in general be found. Because, if we transform and expand as before, there are for every 
even degree above the fourth more than two terms of uneven powers ; and it is impossible, 
unless some relation amongst the coefficients be given, to determine 6 so as to make the 
coefficients of more than two of the uneven terms vanish. The required relation is 
easily found. The equation must be a symmetrical function of x/a and y/b. This being 
premised, if 6 be the angle between X and x, the inclination of the secondary axis, x, to the 
primary is given by the relation, tan 6 = b/a. This will he made clear by two examples. 



(13a). To find the Secondary Axes of the Curve X n ja n ±Y n /b n = 1. 

(a) Taking first the upper sign, and transforming to axes equally inclined to the 
primary, by the formula X. = (x — y) cos ; Y = (x + y) sin 6, we find for the transformed 
equation the expression 

^^\ x n - nx'^y + V^rX y x n-^ - &c. I + ?H±A i x n + na»-*y + &c\ = l. 

Let cos n 6/a n = sm n 6/b n , or tan 6 = bja; then all the uneven terms disappear, and the 
equation is accordingly referred to conjugate diameters, which are equal in length, and 
symmetrically placed with reference the principal axes. These diameters coincide with 
the diagonals of the circumscribing parallelogram, whose sides are parallel to the principal 
axes of the oval of the ?* th degree. 

(b) If the equation be taken with the negative sign, it is the terms of even powers 
which disappear in the transformation, and the secondary axes found are asymptotes of 
the hyperbolic curve. 

(c) It is to be observed that the values above found for the inclination of the 
asymptotes of homogeneous symmetrical functions equated to an arbitrary term, are 
solutions of the relative functions equated to zero. Because the equation of the asymptote 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1069 

of a homogeneous curve is always that of the curve deprived of its arbitrary term. Hence 
yjx = bja is a solution of an equation in either of the forms 

x n x n-2 y2 3,71-4 yi ^ 2/" _ A 

a" ^ aF 2 ~P ^ a" 3 * fr ~ ¥ ~ 

x n x n-1 x n-i y n-i yn-1 y„ 

If we divide the first of these by y n we obtain the form 



ra— 4 

=F=F = 1 



Treating x[y as a single quantity u, we see that an equation of descending powers of u 
equated to unity is always soluble, if its coefficients constitute a homogeneous function 
of a and b, in which case ajb is a real root of the equation. 



(136). To find the Secondary Axes of any Curve of Symmetrical Expression referred to 

principal Axes. 

The equation if homogeneous is of the form, 

x n ± A 2 *"- 2 2/ 2 ± A 4 cc n - V ± . . . =F A/f- 4 =p A 2 x 2 y n _~ 2 +y n = 1 . 

In this symmetrical expression (after transformation to secondary axes equally 
inclined to the primary) every pair of homologous terms produces an expansion of the 
form (5) or (6) of p. 1065 above. The coefficients of the corresponding terms in the two 
expansions are equal, and the sum of the alternate columns is zero. 

In the same way for curves of the form 

A^j-A^lVj. x 2 y n ~ 2 y n _ 

A a „± A 2a „_ 2 ^ ± • . . -t" A 2a2 bn _ 2 ± bn - 1 , 

it may be shown, by taking u = xja, and v — yjb, that, when the curve is transformed by 
the formula for axes equally inclined to the primary axes, the coefficients of the alternate 
columns disappear, or are neutralised, when cos n dja n = sm n djb n ; or tan 6 = bja. 

The solutions here given are applicable to symmetrical heterogeneous curves in 
any of the above forms, as may be verified by expanding separately the several homo- 
geneous parts u-l u 2 , &c, which are of the above form; because in the proof of the Rule 
of Signs it is not assumed that the equation is homogeneous, but only that it consists 
of pairs of homologous terms equated to a constant. 



1070 



HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 



14. Sextic Curves of the Homogeneous Form F(x, y) 6 =A e . 

The equation is understood to be referred to principal axes when it consists of terms 
of even powers only ; but in the case of the symmetrical oval it will be seen that this 
description applies to each of the two pairs of conjugate axes ; and there is, geometrically 
speaking, no reason why either pair should be considered principal axes preferentially to 
the other pair. The curves of this class do not pass through the centre. 

In order to obtain fundamental forms, symmetrical equations are first to be 
considered. Of these there are in strictness only four species, corresponding to 
the four symmetrical combinations of the positive and negative signs of the terms. 
There are, for the sixth degree, two other forms, (y) and (8), in which the coefficients 
are symmetrical, but the signs are not symmetrical. In the form (y) the extreme 
terms are positive, and the intermediate terms have unlike signs, the order of the signs 
being + + — +. In the form (8) the extreme terms have unlike signs and the 
intermediate terms have like signs, the order being + + + — . The forms obtained 
by changing all the signs of the variables are, of course, the same curves. Also (y) is a 
variety of (/3), and (8) is a variety of (£). As the equations are symmetrical, the equal 
coefficients of the highest powers disappear by division ; the equations of the equiaxial 
curves of the sixth degree may then be written — 



ai<5 + Pay + Pay + y 6 = A G 
a 6 - p«y - Pay + y G = A c 

x e + p^y - Pay + y e = a 6 
x 6 + Pay + P^y - y 6 = a 6 

a 6 - Pay + Pay - y 6 = A 6 
a 6 + Pay - Pay - y 6 = A 6 



(a) 

08) 

(7) 

0) 
(•) 
(0 



Referring to p. 1062, where the principle of classification is indicated, (a) is the Sextic 
Oval ; (/3) is the Inflexional Oval, passing into the Continuous Hyperbolic ; (e) is the 
Discontinuous Hyperbolic, consisting of alternate real and imaginary branches ; (y), (8), 
and (£) are Inflexional Hyperbolics. 



(14a). To find the Equations of the Equiaxial Curves referred to Secondary Axes. 

The coordinates of the original equations being denoted by capitals, if, in the 
formula of transformation, we were to make Y=(x+y) M f%, we should obtain negative 
values of A 6 in the transformed functions (e) and (Q. Therefore, let X = (x + y) J\ ; 
Y = {x — y)J\, and transform to bisecting axes. 

In the transformation of equations (a) and (ft), we have for the sum of the 1st and 

4th terms, 

l/4{a 6 + 15ay+15ay + 2/ c }=X 6 +Y 6 ; 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1071 

and for the sum of the 2nd and 3rd terms, 

1/4P {x 6 - x*y 2 - x*y* + y 6 } = PX 4 Y 2 + PX 2 Y 4 ; 

whence, by addition and subtraction we find for (a') and (ft) (being the curves, a and ft, 
referred to their secondary axes). 

(l + P)x 6 +(15-P)*Y+(15-P)xY + (l + P)2/ 6 = 4A 6 . . . (a\); 
(l-P> 6 +(15+P>Y+(15 + P)xY + (l-P)2/ 6 = 4A 6 . . . (ft). 

Again, in the transformation of (e) and (£) we have for the sum of the two extreme 

terms, 

l/4{6x 5 2/ + 20xhf + 6xy 5 } = X 6 - Y 6 , 

and for the sum of the two intermediate terms, 

1/4P{ =F 2x 5 y ± 4&y =F 2xy 5 } =F PX 4 Y 2 ± PX 2 Y 4 , 

where the upper and the lower signs belong respectively to the equations (e) and (£). 

Observing that the numerical coefficients are divisible by 2, we have for (e) and (<^), 

by addition, 

(3-~P)x 5 y + (l0 + 2V)x 3 y 3 + (3-?)xy 5 = 2A 6 (e) 

(3 + P)x 5 2/+(10-2P)a;Y + (3 + P)^ 5 = 2A 6 .... (O 

The above are all the forms of symmetrical diametral equations that can be formed with 
four or three terms. If we seek for those that may be formed with only two terms, it is 
evident that 

(1) The form x 6 + y 6 = A 6 , is a limiting form of (a) and (ft when P = . (c^) ; 

(2) x 6 — y 6 = A 6 , is a limiting form of (e) and (£) when P = . . . (e 1 ) ; 

(3) 4x Y + 4#Y = A 6 , is a limiting form of (ft), and therefore of (ft when P = l, 

and is also a limiting form of (a'), (a), when P = — 1 . . . (ft) ; 

(4) ix b y + 4xy 5 = A 6 , is a limiting form of (<^), (£), when P = 5, and of (e), (e) 

when P=-5 (f t ). 

Now we cannot directly obtain the last two forms with the negative sign from any of 
preceding equations. Hence, there are apparently two independent limiting forms, 

AxY— 4xY = A 6 ; (e") and ixhj - Ixtf = A 6 . '. . (ft'). 

On further consideration, it is seen that (e") is derivable from (e) or (e), if the 
coefficients of the intermediate terms in the fundamental equations are supposed invari- 
able, while the extreme terms, x 6 , y 6 are supposed to be multiplied by coefficients which 
are indefinitely diminished. Transforming to secondary axes, we find 

(1) The equation of (e") is unaltered in form and value by transformation (e") 

(2) The equation of ft' is 2x h y-±xhf + 2x'y h =\ (ft'), 



1072 HON. LORD M'LAKEN ON SYSTEMS OF 

which is different from any of the previously given forms. But it has been found, 
as the result of the computation of values of r and 0, that this curve is identical with 
No. 10 of the table given below, which is of the form (/3) ; the explanation being that 
the curve consists of four real and four conjugate branches, and has accordingly four pairs 
of conjugate diameters. 

As the result of a study of the fundamental forms here given, I have found that there 
are certain other critical values of P which produce characteristic forms of the equiaxial 
curves. These I proceed to enumerate. From the drawings and relative tabular places 
(computed by the method of homogeneous variation) a very complete conception may be 
obtained of the possible variations of this family of sextic curves and their projections. 



(146). Limiting Forms of the Equiaxial Curves. 

If n, the index number of a curve, be divisible into factors, p and q, a symmetrical 
function of the p th or q th degree may be a limiting form of the symmetrical curve of the 
n th degree ; for we have only to raise the equation of the p th degree to the power q, or 
to raise the equation of the q th degree to the power p to obtain such a limiting form. 

Thus, (l) by raising the equation x 2 =by' 2 = A 2 to the 3rd power, we obtain the circle 
and the equilateral hyperbola in the sextic form, 

x 6 ± 3* V + Sx 2 y* ± y e = A 6 ; 

where, the upper sign being taken, we see that the circle is a limiting form of the 
equiaxial curve (a), when P = 3. The lower sign being taken, the curve is the equi- 
lateral hyperbola, which is thus showm to be a limiting form of the equiaxial curve 
(e) when P = 3. Similarly by writing x/a for x, and yfb for y, it may be shown that any 
ellipse or hyperbola is a limiting form of the sextic curve which is the projection of (a), 
or (e) to the principal axes a and b. 

(2) It might be expected that a symmetrical cubic would also be a limiting form of 
an equiaxial sextic. This, however, is not universally true. I shall, however, write 
down the limiting forms obtained by squaring the symmetrical cubics x 3 ± y s = A 3 , and 
x 2 y ± xy 2 = A 3 . 

These forms, with the equivalent forms obtained by transforming to secondary axes, 
are as follows : — 

(x 3 ±y s ) 2 ) J« 6 + 6a;V+9«V 



i=A«- j^+^v+^V) 2A6 

j ' {if + GyW + difx*) 



a: 8 ± 2x 3 y 3 + y 6 

(x 2 y±y 2 x) 2 \ lx«-2xY+ *Vl = 2A 6 

x 4 y 2 ±2x s y 3 +x 2 y*) \y< i =2y i x 2 + yW) 

The forms in the second column are limiting cubic forms for a sextic curve referred 
to a transverse diameter X, and an asymptote Y, or the converse, as is made evident by 
dividing the equations by x 2 or y' 2 respectively. 






SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1073 

(3) Another series of critical forms is the series where the coefficient P=l. By 
making P = 1 in the four equations (a). (/3), (e), and (£) we obtain curves which may also 
be obtained by the multiplication of the factors (x 2 +y 2 ), (x 2 — y 2 ) with (x i + y i ) and 
(x i —y i ). The forms (ft) and (£) are also obtained by the multiplication of (x 2 =hy 2 ) 2 with 
(x 2 =p y 2 ). 

(4) A fourth series of critical forms are those which correspond with the polar 
equations of sines and cosines of multiple arcs. These will be noticed in their order. 



(14c). Form and Variations of the Equiaxial Curves (a) and (ft). 

It is desirable to give a name to the variation of the curve consequent on the variation 
of the single coefficient P. 

In equations of the 2nd degree the term "eccentricity" has relation to the 
variation due to projection, which is the only kind of variation of which these curves 
admit. 

But in curves of the higher degrees, where we consider only those characteristics that 
are unaltered by projection, this kind of eccentricity is not considered at all. Hence, 
without ambiguity, I may make use of the term Quadrantal Eccentricity to denote the 
variation within each quadrant in the magnitude or direction of the secondary axes due 
to the variation of P, while the principal parameters remain unaltered. 

The quadrants referred to are of course those which are marked out by rectangular 
reference lines, coinciding with the equal principal diameters or parameters of the 
curve. 

Length of a Secondary Diameter in terms of the principal Diameter and P. — The 
variation of P in the oval of fourfold symmetry, has no effect on the direction of the 
secondary diameters, but only alters the ratio of their length to that of the primary. 
It is convenient always to put the length of a principal diameter =1, which is then also 
the value of the arbitrary term. The ratio of the secondary diameter to the primary 
may be denoted by T, which is also numerically the length of the former. In the oval 
forms of (a) and (/3) we then find for the length of the secondary diameters, by putting 
x = y ; r 2 = 2x 2 , the relation, 

2P + 2-i-^- • 1 - P+1 - P-l-l 

In curves of the hyperbolic type where the variation of P affects the direction of the 
asymptotes, the quadrantal eccentricity might be measured by the tangent of their 
inclination to the principal axis ; but this relation has not been fully investigated. 

Examples of the Curves, (a) and (/?). — The following equiaxial curves of the forms 
(a) and (/3) have been computed and traced. The number in the first column is a 
reference number corresponding with that in the second table ; P and T are as above ; 



1074 



HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 



P 1 is the coefficient of the intermediate terms when the equation is transformed to 
secondary axes, the arbitrary term then being T 6 . 



No. 


P. 


r. 


Equation of Curve. 


1. 


4 


i 


4x y 2 + 4<x 2 y =1 


2. 


31 


Jh 


x 6 + 3 IxY + SlxY + y« = 1 


3. 


15 


(i) 1 ' 6 


x 6 + 15afy 2 + 15x*y* + y e =l 


4. 


7 


(h) m 


x 6 + 7x*y 2 + 7x 2 y 4 + y G = l 


5. 


3 


i 


x 6 + Sx*y 2 + 3x 2 y i + y e =l 


6. 


1 


(2) 1 ' 6 


x 6 + x*y 2 + x 2 y i + y % = \ 


7. 





(4) 1 ' 6 


x 6 + +2/ 6 = l 


8. 


_i 

2 


72 


x 6 - \x*y 2 - \x 2 y i + y* = l 


9. 


-1 


QO 


x 6 - x^y 2 — x 2 y i + y 6 = l 


10. 


-5 


-1 


x 6 — bxty 2 - 5«V+2/ 6=1 



No. 5 is the limiting circle. Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 are the transformed equations 9, 8, 7, 
and 6, with the curves turned round through an angle of 45°. On referring to Plate I., 
where the numerals attached to the curves are those of the first column of the table, it is 
seen that starting from the circle, as P falls from 3 to 0, the curve approaches more 
nearly to the circumscribing square (PL I. figs. 6, 7). For all negative values of P 
between and — 1 the curve is inflexional (fig. 8), the secondary axis becoming more and 
more elongated, until at the value P= — 1 it passes into the continuous equilateral 
hyperbolic (fig. 9). 

For values of P from — 1 to — 5 the curve is the discontinuous hyperbolic, where the 
angle between asymptote and axis ranges from 45° to 22° 30', or 90° to 45° between the 
asymptotes. 

In the diagram the curves 1, 2, 3, 4 are seen to be 9, 8, 7, 6, diminished and turned 
round through 45°. 

For the value P= — 5 (No. 10 of the Table) we have four equal discontinuous hyper- 
bolics, having angle between asymptotes = 45° (PI. II. fig. 2). The intervening angular 
spaces may be made to contain four equal and similar conjugate curves by changing the 
signs of all the variable terms in the equation. The equation of No. 10 referred to 
secondary axes contains only uneven powers (see No. 15). This curve also has the polar 
equation, r 6 cos 40 = A 6 . 

For negative values of P exceeding 5 we find hyperbolics of greater eccentricity, which 
are the conjugate curves of the series found for values of P between — 1 and —5. The 
equation of these may also be obtained in another form, from the last-mentioned series, 
by changing the signs of all the variable terms. It is easily seen that a similar series of 
curves are obtained from the form (y), because one negative term suffices to make the 
oval inflexional. 

The annexed table contains the places of x and y computed by the homogeneous 
method for curves 6 to 10 of the preceding table, so far as necessary, viz., from 0° to 45°. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 



1075 



From 45° to 90°, the places are obtained by changing x for y, and the places in the other 
three quadrants by changing the signs of x and y. 



Table of Computed Places. 



6 


10° 


15° 


20° 


25° 


30° 


35° 


40° 


45° 


Curve 
6. 


x \ 09947 
y \ 01754 


09877 
0-2646 


09766 
03555 


09603 
0-4478 


09365 
05406 


0-9026 
06320 


0-8557 
07180 


07936 
07936 


Curve 

7. 


x S 0-9999 
y \ 0176 


09998 
0268 


09996 
0364 


0-9984 
0466 


0994 
0574 


0-982 
0-687 


0951 
0798 


0-891 
0-891 


Curve 

8. 


x j 1002 
y\ 0177 


1007 
0270 


1-013 
0369 


1022 

0-477 


1037 
0599 


1048 
0734 


1049 
0880 


10* 
10 


Curve 
9. 


x J 1-006 
y \ 0178 


1-014 
0272 


1028 
0-374 


1051 
0490 


1091 
0630 


1-171 
0-820 


T373 
1-152 


00 + 
00 





e 


5° 


7° 30' 


10° 


12° 30' 


15° 


17° 30' 


20° 


22° 30' 


Curve 
10. 


X 

y 

log r 


1007 
0088 
0005 


1016 
0134 
0010 


1-030 
0182 
0019 


1051 
0233 
0032 


1-084 
0291 
0050 


1140 
0360 

0-078 


1-258 
0458 
0127 


00 
00 
00 



(lAd). Examples of the other Equiaxial Curves. 

The following equiaxial curves of the forms e and £ have been computed and 
traced : the second column is a reference number, corresponding with that in the sub- 
joined table of computed places : I, is the inclination of asymptote to transverse axis. 
The equation of each curve being given in different forms, those containing even 
powers are referred to a transverse axis X ; those containing odd powers are referred 

* For No. 8, the following additional values are necessary to trace the second inflexion — 





41° 


42° 


43° 


44° 


X 

y 


1-045 
0-908 


1039 
0-935 


1-030 
0961 


1-016 
0981 



t For No. 9 we find also, = 44° 59'; x = 4-165 ; y = 4 - 163. And for other curves additional places have been com- 
puted where necessary for tracing the inflexions. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 8 A 



1076 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

to an asymptote X ; the polar equations in c and £ are referred to the transverse 



axis. 



Class. 


No. 
11. 


I. 


Equations of the Curves. 


e 


45° 


f x 6 — x 4 y 2 +x 2 y i — y 6 =1 
{ x 5 y + 6x 3 y 3 + xy 5 =1 


c 


12. 


15° 


(afi-15afy* + 15a?y*-y* =1 

-J =F 6x 5 y ± 20x 3 y 3 =F Qxy 5 = 1 
( r 6 .cos(60) = 1 : r 6 . sin(60) = 1 


e 
or 

t 


13. 


45° 


f £B 6 — 2/ 6 =l =1 

j Sx 5 y + I0x 3 y 3 + 3xy & = 2 


f 


14. 


45° 


( x^+xty 2 — x 2 y* — y 6 =1 
-< 2x 5 y + 4<x 3 y 3 + 2xy s = 1 
I r*.cos(20) = 1 : r 6 . sin(20) = 1 


iar 


15. 


22° 30' 


( i\ x h y — 4>xy 5 = 1 
J4^y_ 4x y 5 =1 

( r 6 . sin(40) = 1 : r° cos (40) =1 


ft 

€ 


16. 


... 


( 4>x*y 2 — 4a% 4 =1 
| 2x 5 2/ — 4cc 3 7/ 3 + 2an/ 6 = 1 



The mode of variation of these curves is very remarkable ; and it is the more deserving 
of attention, because it results from the rule of signs (p. 1065) thatyb?" any even degree 

* The identity of the polar equations in the annexed tables with the Cartesian equations is proved as follows : — 
Cos(20) = cos 2 — sin 2 0; 
Cos (40) = cos*6 - 6 cos 2 . sin 2 0"+sin 4 0; 
Cos (60) = cos a 6 - 15 cos 4 0. sin 2 0+15 cos 2 0". sin 1 6 - sin°0. 
. -. (1) A 6 = r". cos (26) = ^(r 2 . cos ¥e) = (x 2 +y 2 ) 2 . r 2 (cos 2 6 - ain 2 6) 
= x«+x*y 2 - x 2 y* - y 6 . [No. 14 of Table.] 

(2) A 6 = r°. cos (46) =r 2 . (r 4 . cos 46) = (x 2 +y 2 ) . r 4 . (cos 4 - 6 cos 2 0. sin 2 0+sin 4 0) 

=x° - 5x*y 2 - SxY+y 6 . [No 10 of Table.] 

(3) A 6 = r 8 . cos (60)=r e (coa e - 15 cos 4 0. sin 2 <)+15 cos 2 0. sin 46 - sin 6 0) 

= x*~ lbxy+WxY-y . [No. 12 of Table.] 

Again, observing that — 

Sin (20) = 2 sin 6. cos 6; 
Sin(40) = 4cos 3 0. sin 6 — 4 cos 6. sm 3 6; and 
Sin (66) = 6cos h 6. sin 0-20 cos 3 sin 3 0+6 cos 6. sin b 6. 
.-. (1) A« = r«.sin(2l)=r 4 (r 2 sin 20) = (x 2 +y 2 )2xy 
= 2x & y4-4x 3 y 3 +2xy\ [No. 14 of Table.] 

(2) A 6 =r«. sin (40)=r 2 (r*. sin 46) = (x 2 +y 2 )(4x 3 y -4xy 3 ) 

= 4x*y - 4xf. [No. 15 of Table.] 

(3) A« = r«. sin (60) = 6x*y - 20x 3 y 3 +6xy\ [No. 12 of Table.] 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 



1077 
The 



there is a series of equivalent curves which go through corresponding phases, 
different forms are shown in PL II. figs. 1 to 4. 

In their complete forms the equiaxial curves (e) of the 6th degree have three pairs of 
asymptotic axes ; one pair being the secondary axes, whose inclination to the primary 
axes is always 45°; the other two pairs having an inclination depending on the value 
of P (fig. 3). 

Table of Computed Places. 






Curve 
11. 


e 

X 

y 


10° 

1005 
0-177 


15° 

1012 
0-271 


20° 

1021 
0372 


25° 

1034 
0-482 


30° 

1054 
0-608 


35° 

1079 
0756 


40° 

1146 
0961 


44° 59' 

2470 
2-468 


45° 

OO 
00 


Curve 
12. 


e 

X 

y 


2° 

1002 
0035 


4° 

1013 
0071 


6° 

1030 
0108 


8° 

1059 
0149 


10° 

1106 
0195 


12° 

1190 
0253 


14° 

1-414 
0353 


15° 

00 
00 


Curve 
13. 


e 

X 

y 


10° 

1000 
0176 


15° 

1000 
0-268 


20° 

1001 
0364 


25° 

1002 

0-467 


30° 

1007 
0-581 


35° 

1021 
0715 


40° 

1074 
0901 


44° 59' 

2-461 
2460 


45° 

OO 
OO 


Curve 
14. 


6 

X 

y 


5° 

0-9986 
0-0874 


10° 

0-9951 
0-1755 


15° 

0-9895 
02652 


20° 

0-9824 
03576 


25° 

09754 
0-4548 


30° 

09721 
05611 


35° 

0-9797 
06860 


40° 

1024 
0861 


45° 

OO 
OO 


Curve 
15.* 


e 

X 

y 

log r 


0° 

00 

0° 

00 


2° 30' 

1-338 
0-058 
0127 


5° 

1191 
0104 
0-078 


7° 30' 

1113 
0-147 
0050 


10° 

1060 
0187 
0032 


12° 30' 

1021 
0226 
0019 


15° 

0989 
0265 
0010 


17° 30' 

0-964 
0304 
0005 


22° 30' 

0924 
0383 
00011 


Curve 
16. 




X 

y 


0° 

00 




5° 

1-786 
0156 


10° 

1-421 
0251 


15° 

1-247 
0334 


20° 

1139 
0414 


25° 

1066 
0-497 


30° 

1020 
0589 


35° 

1000 
0700 


40° 

1030 

0-865 


45° 

OO 
OO 



In the form (e), when P = 3, the curve has the limiting form of the equilateral 
hyperbola (of 2nd degree), the three pairs of asymptotes being there coincident. 

When P>3, there are six equal real branches, and six conjugate branches. If P 
exceeds 3 by a very small quantity, the first real branch (bisected by X) is nearly rectan- 
gular, and the first conjugate branch is extremely acute. The secondary axis divides 
this from a similar acute real branch ; and then there is a nearly rectangular conjugate 
branch bisected by Y. When P = 7, the inclination of the first pair of asymptotes is 



* These values of log r are identical with those of No. 10 of the preceding table. In No. 15 the curve is referred 
to asymptotes. 



1078 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

± 22° 30', and the first real branch is contained within an angle of 45°. The first 
conjugate branch and the second real branch are contained within angles of 22° 30' ; 
and the second conjugate branch (bisected by Y) is contained within the angle 45°, 
and so on. 

When P= 15 there are six real and six alternate conjugate branches all equal, each 
contained within an angle of 30° (fig. 3). When P exceeds 15, we have a series of pairs 
of unequal curves (which have not been fully investigated), but are probably the con- 
jugates of the preceding set. 

Returning to the neutral form of the equilateral hyperbola, and varying P by 
diminishing it indefinitely : — If P>0 and <3, x and y can only become infinite for 
= ±45°; and we have a series of equilateral forms consisting of two real and two 
conjugate branches. The variation of P between these limits only affects the quadrantal 
eccentricity. The form x 6 —y 6 = 1 is the limit between the forms (e) and (£). In PI. II. 
fig. (1) the curve which is nearest the centre is No. 13 of the Table ; the curve furthest 
from the centre is the limiting equilateral hyperbola; and the intermediate curve is No. 11. 

In the series (£), where the signs of the two intermediate terms of the equation do 
not follow in alternate order, the curves are inflexional and equilateral, the only 
asymptotes being the secondary axes. 

In Plate II. fig. 4, the curve which is nearest the centre is No. 14 of the Table. 
The curve next it, having the same pair of asymptotic axes, is traced from an equation 
of the same form with a different coefficient, (P=15). The curve which has the axis of 
X for one of its asymptotes is evidently a limiting form of the same series, and is No. 16 
of the Table. Its minimal radius- vector corresponds to 

= tan" * -5 = 26° 34', nearly. 

The variety (8) resembles (£) in its forms and inflexions, but is not equilateral, as 
(£) is. One of these forms is figured, PI. IV. fig. 4. Its equation is 

x 6 +x i y 2 +x 2 y i — y 6 = l ; 

and for the curve figured (P = 1) the inclination of asymptotes to axis X (which depends 
on the value of P) is 53° 37', nearly. 

All the curves here traced have been computed by the tangent formula, which is the 
best for studying the transitions from one of the enumerated forms to the other or 
others. 

General Results. — It is evident that the results which have been obtained are in the 
main independent of the degree of the symmetrical homogeneous equation. For 
equations of curves of even degree, referred to axes of symmetry, these results may be 
generalised as follows : — 

(l) If all the terms are positive, the curve is an oval of fourfold symmetry, entirely 
concave to the centre, and having the circle as a limiting form. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1079 

(2) If all the pairs of homologous terms of the symmetrical expression have like 
signs, but some of the pairs are positive and some are negative, the curve is the In- 
flexional oval, for all positive values of the coefhcients ivhich are less than those of the 
binomial expansion, and for all fractional negative values. Outside these limits the 
curve is a hyperbolic, with alternate real and conjugate branches, the limit between 
the closed and open forms being the continuous hyperbolic in which all the branches are 
equal and real. 

(3) If all the pairs of homologous terms have unlike signs, and if the equation when 
arranged in binomial form has the terms (being all even) alternately positive and 
negative, the curve consists generally of n hyperbolic real branches, with alternating con- 
jugate branches ; but for certain values of the coefficients, the number may be reduced 
to two equilateral real branches, having the equilateral hyperbola as a limiting form. 

(4) If all the pairs of homologous terms have unlike signs, but if the positive and 
negative terms do not follow in alternate order, the curve consists of two equilateral 
inflected branches, the curve being concave to the centre and to the asymptotes where it 
crosses the axis of X, but after inflexion on either side of that axis becoming convex 
to the asymptotes. 

The same form, where some of the pairs of terms have like signs, and some have 
unlike signs, except that the assymptotic axes are not rectangular. 

(5) In all cases where the equation is reducible to the two-term Polar form, 

r n cos(p0) = l , 

the curve consists of a number of alternate real and conjugate branches, which are all 
equal. The number of such forms evidently is n/2, because p may have the series of 
values, n, n — 2, n — 4, &c. 

(6) If the equation is not a symmetrical expression, but is homogeneous, the curves 
fall into the above categories, but have not in general secondary axes. 

15. Determination of Contour-lines of Homogeneous Surfaces. 

If v x v 2 be coordinate quantities of any symmetrical diametral equation (suppose of the 
form a), and if x 2 + z 2 be substituted for v\, and y 2 + z 2 for v\, and the equation be expanded 
in terms of powers of x 2 , y 2 , z 2 , we obtain the equation of a symmetrical homogeneous 
surface referred to conjugate diameters. The equation then takes successively the three 
forms which follow — 

v{+~Pvtvl+~Pv*vl+vl=l (1) 

(x 2 +zJ + P(x 2 + z 2 ) 2 (y 2 + z 2 ) + 'P(x 2 + z 2 )(y 2 + z 2 ) 2 + (y 2 + z 2 y = l . . (2) 
x 6 + Sx 4 y 2 + Sx 2 y 4 + z 6 + V{x 4 y 2 + x V + 2x 2 y V + 2x 2 z 4 + z 4 y 2 + z 6 ) 

+ V(y 4 x 2 + y 4 z 2 + 2x 2 y 2 z 2 + 2y 2 z 4 + x 2 z 4 + z e ) + y« + Sy 4 z 2 + 3y 2 z 4 + z° = 1 . . (3). 

If we suppose the equation to be given in the form (3), we can only find values of 



1080 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

x, y, z for a central plane, and it is evidently impossible to determine a contour-line of 
the surface parallel to a central plane. Because if, for example, we make z = a, the 
equation in x and y is thoroughly heterogeneous, containing in fact all the even terms of 
the general equation of the 6th degree. 

But if the equation be presented for solution in the form (2), we can find values of 
x and y in contour series. For we have then only to find a series of values of v\ v\ 
(or x*+z 2 and y 2 + z 2 ); then, making z = a, we find from the series of values v ltl v 2}1 ; 
Vi, 2 v 2 , 2 ; v 1)3 v 2 , 3 , &c, the coordinates 



Xi= Jv u l — a 2 ; x 2 = Jv!,l — a 2 ; x 3 = Jv^ — a 2 ; &c. 



y-i— Jv 2 ,l — cf; y 2 = Jv 2 ,i-a 2 ; y 3 = Jv 2 ,l — d 2 ; &c. 

Through such a series of points a contour-line of the surface, in the plane z = a, may 
be traced. 

In the same manner contour-lines may be traced for other planes parallel to XY, 
viz. z = b ; z = c, &c. 

Such contour-lines have been computed and traced for surfaces derived from the 
curves (a) and (e). 

Plate VI. fig. 1, represents four contour-lines of the above surface (Eq. 2), with the 
coefficient P = 1. The values of v x v 2 were taken from the preceding Tables (curve a, 6). 
The maximum value of z was found to be, z ='7938 ; and the three inner contour-lines 
were found by taking z successively equal to ^z , §z , and fz . The outermost contour- 
line of this figure is the equatorial section of the surface, in the plane, z = 0, and is 
identical with the curve of the Table, which is also figured in PI. I. 

It will be observed that as the circumference of the contour-lines decreases, the 
Variation of curvature within the curve becomes less, the limiting form being evidently 
circular. 

Plate VI. fig. 2, represents a series of contour-lines for the hyperbolic surface of two 
sheets, derived from (e, 12) of the Tables by writing x 2 +z 2 for v\ and y 2 +z 2 for v\. In 
this instance I have been less fortunate in the choice of contour-lines, because the lines 
are not far enough apart to give a clear notion of the figure of the surface. The values 
of z 2 , from which the computations were made, are - 003, "0125, and '0275, and the results 
are shown in the figure. 

I may here observe that, while the preceding illustrations are confined to symmetrical 
forms, it is apparent that if the analytical expressions were varied by merely altering the 
coefficients of the terms, such a variation would only affect the symmetry of the curves, 
and would not in general produce a curve of a different type. There is no difficulty in 
forming any number of systems of unsymmetrical curves or contour-lines of surfaces, as 
we have only to fix on any unsymmetrical homogeneous expression in v x v 2 , and to replace 
these quantities by Jax 2 +z 2 and *]by l -\-z\ giving such values to z as may be desired ; 
x and y are then found from v, v 2 . 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1081 

16. Central Curves whose Equations are of the Form F a (x, y) n = ¥ 2 (x, y) n ~ p . 

The first function may be divisible by the second, without remainder, the equation 
being then reducible to one of lower degree. This will generally be the case where the 
equation consists of pairs of homologous terms, all of which have like signs, or all unlike 
signs. 1 here suppose that the equation is not divisible. 

Confining our attention, as before, to symmetrical diametral equations, it is evident 

that such equations always contain at least one uncombined power of the variables, 

because, if the equation be given in composite terms, we can always divide out the lowest 

powers of x and y. When the equation after reduction consists of only two homogeneous 

parts its form is easily determined. Transforming to polar coordinates and dividing 

f p (cos 6, sin 0) 
by the lowest power of r, we obtain an equation of the form r n ~ p = j^, 4—. — -A. The 

denominator of this fraction is formed from the terms of the highest homogeneous part, 
and if its terms be all positive, r cannot become infinite ; but if the numerator be wholly 
positive and the denominator contains positive and negative terms, there will be 
certain values of d for which r is infinite, these being the same as were found for 
the curves /?, e, £ (p. 1076). Again, if the numerator consists only of positive terms, 
the curve cannot pass through the origin, as it necessarily does where some of the 
terms in the numerator are positive and some are negative. If the terms of 
the highest homogeneous part be all positive, and the terms of the lower degree be 
partly positive and partly negative, the curve will be of the " foliated " type, consisting 
of a series of loops symmetrically arranged about the centre-origin, and having no 
inflexions except at the centre where the trace passes from one loop into another. 

More generally, for symmetrical expressions of any even degree, and any number of 
pairs of homologous terms of even powers of the variables equated to zero ; which may 
be written u n + u n _ 2 + . . . u 2 = : and are supposed to be reduced to their lowest terms, — 

(1) If any pair or pairs of homologous terms of the part u n have unlike signs, while 
the terms of lower degree are all positive, or are all negative, then, by transforming to 
polar coordinates and dividing by r", we find that r n = co is a solution of the equation 
where u n — 0. The curve, therefore, consists of branches of infinite extent resembling 
those already described under the character of contour-lines of surfaces formed from the 
equations (e) and (£). 

(2) If u n consists entirely of positive terms, and if any pair or pairs of terms in the 
parts of lower degree have unlike signs, and the other pairs are all positive, then the 
curve consists of finite branches or loops passing through the centre. Because (l) the 
radius-vector cannot become infinite, since u n consists of positive terms, and (2) when 
cos = sin 6, all the negative terms are neutralised by the homologous positive terms, and 
there remains a series "of positive terms equated to zero ; whence r = 0. In this case, 
since cos 9 = sin 6 when r = 0, the tangents at the centre bisect the angles between the 
axes of reference, and are secondary axes, and the centre is a point of inflexion. 



1082 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

(3) A curve whose equation is strictly symmetrical, and consists of terms of even 
powers, whereof only one homologous pair have unlike signs, can have only two loops ; 
but if any of the homogeneous expressions u n _ 2 , ti„_ 4 , &c, has a middle term, the curve 
may have a number of loops depending on the degree of the equation, because then the 
angle for which r = depends On a relation between three terms. 

(4) A curve, consisting of loops passing through the centre, is also the result where u n 
is positive, and w„_ 2 + u 4 , &c, consists of pairs of positive terms and pairs of terms which 
are both negative ; because evidently there must be definite values of 6 which render 
r = 0. 

(5) If the terms u n _. 2 4- u n _ i} &c, can be resolved into factors, while u n consists of pairs 
of unlike terms, the hyperbolic branches may break up into detached ovals sometimes 
with an infinite branch extending beyond these and within the same angular space. 

These seem to exhaust the possible combinations for symmetrical equations without 
an arbitrary term. 

(6) If we transform to axes equally inclined to the original symmetrical axes, the curve 
will be symmetrical about the new axes also, and the new equation will consist of even 
or of uneven powers of the variables, according to the rule of signs given above (p. 1065). 
In applying the rule, each homogeneous part of the equation is to be considered 
separately; so that, if one homogeneous part consist of positive terms, and the other of 
alternate positive and negative, their equivalents in the transformed equation will consist 
respectively of even and uneven powers. 

(7) There are limiting parabolic forms where the highest homogeneous part contains 
only one of the variables, i.e., consists of a single term. 

(8) In the case of axes which do not meet the curve except at the centre, these are, 
notwithstanding, true diameters, as the form of the equation proves. Accordingly, 
every such Exterior Diameter, if I may so term it, bisects the intercepts made by the 
adjacent branches or chords drawn parallel to the conjugate Exterior Diameter, and 
therefore bisects the Bitangents. 

(9) These results are manifestly true, with the necessary restriction as to angles, for 
all projections of the curves in question. 

(10) By an easy extension of (8) we have for all symmetrical equations of this type, 
and their projections, this relation : Each pair of Bitangents is parallel to one axis of 
symmetry, and is bisected by the axis conjugate to it. 



(16a). Examples of such Curves (Sixth Degree). 

Any of the functions on the left side of the sign of equality may be combined 
with any on the right ; but of course the terms, when equated to zero, cannot all be 
positive. 

The limits suited to this paper have been already so far exceeded that I shall not 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 



1083 



attempt to illustrate all the varieties. The following illustrations of curves of the 6th 
degree of two homogeneous parts include the most characteristic forms : — 

(1) x 6 +3x i y 2 +3x 2 y i +y<> = x 2 -y 2 } 

r 4 = cos 20 j 

(la) x e +3x i y 2 +3x 2 y i + y 6 = 2xy j 

r* = sin 20 J 

(2) x 6 + 3x*y 2 + 3x 2 y* +y 6 = x i - 6x 2 y 2 + y* \ 

r 2 = cos 40 j 

(2a) x^+SxY+SxY+y^^y-ixy 3 \ 

r 2 = sin 40 j 

(3) x 6 - 6a; V + 6xY -tf = A%x 2 - f) 

The following Tables contain the computed places for the symmetrical half of a 
foliation or loop of each curve : — 

Equation (1). 



= 


0° 


5° 


10° 


15° 


20° 


25° 


30° 


35° 


40° 


44° -47 


45° 


T = 


10 


•996 


•985 


•965 


•936 


•895 


•841 


•765 


•646 


•363 


o- 



From 45° to 135° values of r are impossible. 

From 135° to 180° we obtain the above series reversed. 

Similar results from 180° to 360°. 

The curve consists of two loops, and there are two inflexions at the centre. 

PL III. fig. (1) is this curve, and fig. (2) is a projection of it. 

Equation (la). 



= 


0° 


5° 


10° 


15° 


20° 


25° 


30° 


35° 


40° 


45° 


r — 


o- 


•646 


•765 


•841 


•895 


•936 


•965 


•985 


•996 


10 



(la) is therefore (1) transformed to secondary axes, which are the tangents at the 
central point of inflexion. 

Equation (2). 




Equation (2a). 



= 


0° 


r-5 


4° -5 


7°-5 


10°-5 


13°5 


16°5 


19°5 


22°5 


r — 





•323 


•556. 


•707 


•818 


•900 


•956 


•989 


10 



VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 



8 B 



1084 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

Equation (2a) represents the same curve as (2) transformed to axes inclined to the 
former at the angle 22° "5, and having the axes tangents at the centre origin. Values of 
r are impossible for each alternate arc of 45°. The curve consists of four equal, similar, 
and symmetrical loops or foliations, and the centre is a point of inflexion for the four 
intersecting lines (fig. 3). Fig. (4) is a linear projection of the same curve. 

In this and the preceding figure the bitangents are seen to be parallel to the conju- 
gate axes. 

The same construction is evident in fig. 4, which is a projection of the last- 
mentioned curve. 

Equation (3). 



0= 


0° 


10° 


15° 


20° 


22°-5 


23° 


i 
23°10 


r = 


1 


103 


115 


1-37 


1-68 


326 


00 



Plate III. fig. 5, represents this curve, which consists of four hyperbolic branches 
without inflexions. As these branches do not pass through the centre, although u 2 
contains a negative term, it is evident that the equation is reducible to one of lower 
degree with an arbitrary term. Accordingly, by division we find for the reduced form of 
equation (3), — cc 4 + y 4 —5x 2 y 2 = A 6 , or say, = 1. 

17. Contour-lines of Surfaces derived from Central Curves passing through 

their Centres. 

Having already explained the mode of derivation of such lines, it is here only 
necessary to describe the illustrative figures (PL VI. figs. 3 and 4). 

Figure 3 represents a surface with a central core or axis, being the axis of Z. It is 
formed from equation (1), above, by taking r 2 = r /2 +z 2 . z =l is a maximum, and the 
four contour-lines are sections of the derived surface in the planes, z = 0, z = *65, z=75, 
and z='9. 

Figure 4 is formed from Equation 2 (above) by transforming to x-and-y coordinates, 
and then taking x 2 = x 2 +z /2 ; y 2 = y' 2 +z 2 . z =l is a maximum, and the contour-lines are 
for sections of the derived surface in the planes, z = 0, z='l, and z=*14. 

In this surface the pear-shaped figures are only united at the cusps, which are also 
points of inflexion, and the sections consist of detached loops. The diagram makes clear 
what is the kind of variation of an equation by which a continuous looped curve may 
break up into detached loops or ovoids. We see that these only become continuous 
through the disappearance of the quantity z, and by the equation becoming a homo- 
geneous function of x and y of the form, 

F B (a!,y)/F B .>,y)=l. 

It will be understood that these contour-lines are all traced from a sufficient number 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1085 

of computed values of x and y, although I have not printed the tables of computed 
places. 

18. The Wave-Surface. 

This surface, as usually given, is of the form 

a 2 x 2 /(r 2 -a 2 ) + by/(r 2 -b 2 ) + c 2 z 2 /(r 2 -c 2 ) = . . . . (1). 

This, when cleared of fractions and expanded, is an equation of the 6th degree, contain- 
ing all the terms of even powers of the general sextic equation of three variables. 

If, however, the equation be merely cleared of its fractional form, and the terms be 
arranged in powers of r, it has the form 

{ a 2 x 2 + b 2 y 2 + c 2 z 2 }r i — a 2 b 2 c 2 r* + a 2 b 2 c 2 r 2 = ; 

whence, dividing by a 2 b 2 c 2 r 2 , and writing a, /3, and y, for b 2 c 2 , c 2 a 2 , and a 2 b 3 , we have 

{x 2 /a + y 2 ll3 + z 2 ly}r 2 -r 2 + l = 0; (2), 

where 

r 2 = x 2 + y 2 + z 2 . 
This may be written 

w- 4 — «- 8 +l = ( 3 ) ! 

where u± and u 2 are homogeneous functions of x 2 , y 2 , and z 2 (or of x 2 and y 2 in the plane 
curve), consisting entirely of positive terms. 

The generalised form of the wave-surface, or wave-curve of any even degree, 
evidently is 

u m + u„+ . . —u p — u g +l = (4); 

where u is defined as above. The equation has an arbitrary term. The definition of u 
implies that each homogeneous part of the equation consists of terms of like signs, and 
under this condition this equation of different homogeneous parts represents an oval 
(though it is usual only to consider the semi-oval) entirely concave to the centre. If 
any of the homogeneous parts u v should consist of a homologous pair of negative terms 
and a homologous pair of positive terms, the curve would be the inflexional oval (PI. IV. 
fig. 5); but, as already seen, so long as each homologous pair of terms have like signs, 
r can neither become or oo ; and the curve or surface is always and necessarily a 
continuous closed curve of double symmetry. 

Plate III. (fig. 7) is a representation of the limiting form of the 4th degree, obtained 
from equation (1) by suppressing the 3rd term. The reduced equation is 

a 2 x A + (a 2 + b 2 )x 2 y 2 + b 2 y* — a 2 b 2 r 2 , 



1086 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

whence 

a 2 cos 4 + (a 2 + 6 2 )cos 2 0.sin 2 + 6 2 sin 4 = a?b 2 /r\ [a = £ ; 6 = £] . Dividing by a 2 6 2 , 
.*. 9 cos 4 0+13 cos 2 sin 2 + 4 sin 4 = 1/r 2 . 



= 


0° 


5° 


10° 


15° 


20° 


25° 


30° 


35° 


40° 




r = 


•333 


•33 


4336 


•340 


•345 


•351 


•359 


•369 


•380 




= 


45° 


50° 


55° 


60° 


65° 


70° 


75° 


80° 


85° 


90° 


r = 


•392 


•406 


•421 


•437 


•452 


•467 


•480 


•491 


•498 


•500 



Eeturning to the equation of the wave-surface in its usual form (1), the curve of any 

section through an axis, Z, is most easily computed by transforming to polar coordinates. 

If, as usual, we make x = rcos0.cos(p ; 2/ = rsin0.cos<£ ; z=rsm<p; and then divide by 

v 2 cos 2 <£, we obtain 

/c 2 - r 2 \ ( /a 2 . cos 2 0\ , /6 2 sin 2 0\ ) . 

(^){(l*^) + \^¥)\= tan *' 

whence 4> may be found for any given values of r and . 

In the following illustration, PI. III. fig. (6), I suppose a section through Z making 

the angle 

= 45; sin0 = cos0= VF- C = 3; 6 = 2; a = l. 

The form of the equation shows that r must be >2 ; <3 .* 



T — 


20 


205 


21 


2-2 


23 


2-4 


25 


26 


2-7 


2-8 


29 


30 


6 = 


90° 


73°2 


58° 


47°-l 


39°-7 


33°8 


28°-7 


24°-2 


19°9 


15°5 


10°5 


o°- 



The two curves are shown in figs. (7) and (6), and although the first is of the 4th 
degree and the 2nd is of the 6 th degree, the resemblance is very apparent. These may 
be compared with the curve of PI. II. fig. (5), which represents the symmetrical equation 

cc 4 +a;y+2/ 4 = K2/ 2 +2/ 2 )- 

19. Curves Symmetrical about One Axis. 

It has been observed that an ordinary section of a central surface is only central when 
it is taken parallel to a principal plane. But now, if a central section be taken in any 
direction through an axis of symmetry (Y) of the central surface, then all sections parallel 
to this will be symmetrical about y, but will not necessarily or usually be symmetrical 

9 — r 2 1 8 — 2r 2 
* The numerical equation is -— == — — + — -= — — = tan 2 ? . 
* 18^-18 9r 2 - 36 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 



1087 



about the axis perpendicular to Y. To obtain a curve of single symmetry from any 
central surface referred to conjugate axes XYZ, we have only to transform to new axes 
x and z, leaving Y unaltered. If we then make z = unity, or any arbitrary value, within 
proper limits, we obtain an equation in x and y, which is the required equation. If the 
given central surface have all its terms positive, then the form of the curves of the oblique 
sections (parallel to an axis) resembles that of the Cartesian oval; that is, it is a 
symmetrical closed curve without inflexions, but more pointed towards the positive 
direction of x than towards the negative. 

I shall give an illustration of such a curve of the 6th degree. Let the surface 
equation be 

X<5 + Y6 + Z 6 = l. 

This, when transformed to secondary axes in the plane XZ has the equation 

In the equation, as first given, let Y remain unchanged, and let the equation be 
tranformed to axes x and z, each having the inclination 60° to the original plane XY. 
The formula of transformation is 

X = (x — z) . cos 60° ; Z = (x+z). sin 60°. 

If in the transformed equation z be taken equal to unity, and the equation cleared of 
fractions, the resulting expression for the plane curve is 

16y 6 = 9 - { 7a; 6 + 39a; 5 + 105a; 4 + 130a; 3 + 105a; 2 + 39a:}, 

where the new arbitrary term, 9, is the difference between z 6 or unity and the arbitrary 
term of the transformed surface equation. The new plane xy is then inclined at 60° 
toXY. 

The following values of x and y have been computed : — 



- x = -1 -■! 


2 -3 


-•4 


-•5 --6 


-•7 


-•8 


-•9 


±y =(9/16) 1 / 6 -953 -972 -978 


•976 


•967 -950 


•919 


•881 


•801 


= 9086 














- x = --99 -1 


+ # 


1 


•2 










± y = -561 0- 


±y 


•761 


impossible 











The approximate value of +x when y = is "154. 

The value — x = — 1, when y = 0, is exact. 

If the equation of the derivative surface contains the terms Yx^y 1 + Pa; 2 ;?/ 4 , the equa- 
tion of the section may contain additional terms of the form y 2 (x i + x 3 + x 2 + x) and 
y*(x 2 + x), where the coefficients are omitted. 



1088 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

If in the original equation y 6 be taken negative, the surface will be a sextic hyper- 
boloid of one sheet, y being the axis. Taking a section whose inclination to the original 
plane XY is 60°, we obtain the same expression for the plane curve as that last given, 
except that the terms on the right side of the sign of equality have their signs changed. 

The following values of x and y have been computed for this hyperbolic curve of 
single symmetry : the first value only being approximate, those from *2 to 2*0 being 
exact. 



+ x = 


•154 


•2 


•4 


•6 


•8 


10 


20 oo 


=F3/ = 





•80 


114 


1-35 


1-54 


1-72 


260 oo . 



The values of x of the immediately preceding table give an opposite and dissimilar 
branch. 

The two curves are shown in figs. (1) and (2) of PI. IV. 

(19a). To find a Symmetrical Expression for the Oval of Single Symmetry. 

Referring to the figures of the curves, since for every pair of equal positive and 
negative values of y there axe two values of x, it is always possible to inscribe a square 
in such a figure. Let the oval be referred to the diagonals of the inscribed square as 
coordinate axes. Then the equation must satisfy three conditions : — ( 1 ) The uncombined 
terms of x and y are all terms of even powers, otherwise the values of +x and —x would 
not be equal when y = ; (2) the equation is a symmetrical expression, because the axes 
of reference are equally inclined to the axis of symmetry ; (3) the terms are all positive, 
because, according to the rule of signs (above), it is only positive pairs of even terms which, 
when transformed to bisecting axes, produce exclusively even powers ofy, as must be the 
case here. There is a fourth condition. I may here anticipate what is proved in the section 
on radial coordinates, that the algebraic equations of these curves, when referred to their 
axes of symmetry, contain no uneven powers in the even terms; i.e., these even terms are 
of the form x 2p y 2q , and we have already shown that the transformation to axes having the 
inclination 45°, does not introduce uneven powers. Hence (4) our symmetrical equation 
may consist of pairs of the terms x°, y G ; x i y 2 , x 2 y 4 ; x 2 y 2 and x 2 , y 2 together with composite 
uneven terms. If an equation satisfying these conditions be made homogeneous by sup- 
plying powers of z, it is seen that the axes of the plane curve lie in principal planes 
of the homogeneous closed symmetrical surface, and that the origin of the plane curve is 
in a diameter of this surface. 

Unless all the uneven terms are present, the oval will be inflexional. See figure (3) 
of Plate IV. 

Similar results are obtained for the hyperbolic curve of single symmetry. 

These curves are best investigated by means of radial equations from two foci, as 
given in the sequel. The origin or point to which the last equation is referred has no 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1089 

direct relation that I can discover to the foci. It is certainly not the mean point between 
the foci in the curve of single symmetry, because then the radial equation would be a 
symmetrical expression with equal coefficients, which is of course not the case in curves 
of single symmetry. 

It is evident that the sextic hyperboloid of one sheet, and indeed a similarly con- 
structed surface of any degree, will furnish either oval or asymptotic curves of the quasi- 
Cartesian type, according to the angle at which the section is taken. 

If the equation of such a surface contains only the highest power of one of the positive 
terms, x, then when x n = the arbitrary term, the equation reduces to a pair of right lines 
or rules. But the number of such rules apparently cannot exceed that of the conjugate 
diameters for a hyperboloid of any even degree above the second. 



(196). Examples of Curves of Single Symmetry. 

To form the equation of the oval of single symmetry of any degree, it is not necessary 
to go through the process of forming a surface equation and then transforming to new 
axes. I have only done this to illustrate the theorem that every plane curve is a section 
of a homogeneous surface of the same degree. 

From the mode of formation of the preceding expressions, it is easily seen that a 
symmetrical binomial function of x and z, with the highest power of y added, becomes an 
oval of single symmetry when a definite value is given to z, as in the following illustra- 
tion : — 

F(x + zf = P{« 8 + 8x 7 z + 28x 6 z 2 + 56xW + 70.x% 4 + 56a:V + 28x 2 z 6 + 8xz" + z s ] ± y s = 1 , 

By making %= 1, we obtain 

F(x + zf = P{x 8 + 8x 7 + 28a 6 + 56a 5 + 70a 4 + 56a 3 + 28a 2 + 8a } + P - 1 = =F y* ■ 

If all the signs of the second equation be changed, then the positive sign of y gives the 
closed oval, and the negative sign of y the asymptotic form. 

In this equation for any possible value of x, the positive and negative roots of y are 
equal ; but for a given value of y the roots of x are unequal. 

On these considerations the following methods have been devised for obtaining the 
curves of single symmetry of any degree (1). In any diametral homogeneous equation 
in v x v 2 we may take v x = z+ Jx; v 2 = y ; .'. x= (v x — z) 2 ; whence values of x and y are found 
from v x v 2 for any required value of z. Or we may take v\ = y 2 ; v \ = z 2 + x, whence x = v\ — z 2 ; 
and the equation consists of even powers of y and uneven powers of x. 

The curve of PI. VI. fig. 7, which is of the form of a rifle-ball, was obtained from (a, 6) 
by substituting "5 + >Jx for v x after transforming the origin to the extremity of the axis 
of X. It is of the 12th degree. I might have taken z + x m = 0, or as 3 = v x — z. 

Each of the homogeneous curves, a, /3, e, and £, may be made to furnish by deriva- 



1090 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

tion curves of single symmetry of different degrees. Again, by giving different values 
to z in any of the derived equations, a series of contour-lines may be traced representing 
a surface which is symmetrical about one axis. 

(2) An equation also represents a curve of single symmetry when it is of the homo- 
geneous form u n \u n _ p - 1, and (1) the function u n is of even, and u n _ p of uneven degree, 
and also (2) the terms contain only even powers of one of the quantities, y. Thus the 

equation 

x 6 + FxY + Pay = x 5 - Qx 3 y 2 + 'Rxy i , 

represents a non-central symmetrical equation, from which contour-lines of a derived 
surface maybe obtained by substituting x' + zfor x and y f 2 + z 2 for y in the equation, 
and finding values of x' and y' from x and y for any required value of z. 

I ought, perhaps, to refer here to the case of curves composed of factors ; but the 
subject has been already fully investigated ; and I could scarcely hope to add anything 
material to what has been found by writers of higher authority in these matters. I only 
make this observation, that when equations expressed in terms of factors are expanded 
in terms connected by additive or subtractive signs, it is generally necessary to give 
alternative signs to some of the terms, consistently with the original equation, otherwise 
the complete ovals will not be obtained. I have given an illustration of such a curve of 
the 6th degree, in which the expansion of the terms of factors does not lead to alternative 
signs, and which forms an elegant symmetrical closed curve having thirty-two inflexions 
in its orbit. Its equation is 

(x 2 -l)(x 2 -2)(x 2 -3) + (y 2 -l)(y 2 -2)(y 2 -3) = l. (PI. IV. fig. 5.) 

20. Parabolic Limiting Forms. 

Considered as a section of the homogeneous central surface, a parabola of the n ih degree 
is evidently a section of such a surface parallel to any tangent plane of the asymptotic 
cone. For such a section the inclination of the asymptotes (which is the same as that of 
a parallel section through the centre) vanishes, which proves that the curve is parabolic. 
It is not quite correct to describe a parabola (as is sometimes done) as being a curve 
whose equation wants the highest power of one of the variables. Homogeneous equations 
are always central curves, although they may not contain the highest powers of both 
variables. An equation in x, y, represents a parabolic curve when one of the variables 
does not occur in the highest homogeneous part ; in other words, when the highest part 
consists of a single term, y n , or is reducible to a single term by transformation of axes. 
Because, by transforming to polar coordinates, and dividing by sin" 6, we see that when 
sin 6 is equated to zero r becomes infinite, and that there are no asymptotes, because u n 
consists of a single term. When in the equation of a parabola of any degree, u n consists 
of more than one term, then since u n must be derived by transformation of axes from a 
single term, y n (where y becomes px+qy) the homogeneous part, u n ought to be a 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1091 

complete square, or a complete binomial expansion of px + qy. This would seem to be 
the proper criterion by which an equation not referred to principal axes may be known to 
be the expression of a parabolic curve. 

If the equation consists entirely of terms of even powers, there are two parabolas, one 
on each side of the axis of X, which may in a sense be considered to be two branches 
of a central curve, as in the following easy example : — 



y= o 


i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


x= 


1057 


2379 


4-027 


5-981 


8-206 


10-670 . 






21. Biradial Coordinates. 

The homogeneous equations hitherto treated have been solved for loci determined by 
Cartesian coordinates. The same equations and the same series of values as are above 
found may be represented graphically under different coordinate systems, and so as to 
produce curves differing widely in form and geometric properties from the curves of the 
x-and-y system. 

If to avoid ambiguity we call the coordinates for which values were found v u v 2) these 
may represent radii, angles, or trigonometrical quantities instead of lines drawn to 
coordinate axes ; and the equations may be equations in r x and r. 2 ; X and 0. 2 ; r and x ; 
or r and % (where r is the radius vector from a pole, and z is a perpendicular on a 
directrix). This last system again may be immediately transformed into trilinear 
coordinates by substituting x 2 +y 2 for r 2 . The homogeneous equation in sinflj and 
sin 2 is evidently identical with the homogeneous equation of corresponding terms in 
r 2 and r x ; because in the variable triangle composed of the two radii and the line joining 
the foci the sides are proportional to the sines of the opposite angles. 

As an illustration of what may be done in a new direction with the homogeneous 
equations already examined, the following chapter on a class of Biradials has been 
written : — 

The radial coordinates, from foci F l5 F 2 , are denoted by ryr 2 ; and the distance 
Fi F 2 by 2c. 

The equations here considered are of the form 

r?dbr| = A? (1); r»/A w ± »■?//*" = c 1l Jv n = A" . . (2), 

where the index n is an even number. 

I have not been able to come to a clear conclusion regarding biradial equations of 
uneven degrees. On the one hand, if we seek to transform these to rectangular or 
ordinary polar coordinates, it is necessary to square the equation twice to remove the 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. (NO. 23). 8 C 



1092 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

radical, so that a biradial equation of the 3rd degree corresponds to an equation of 
the 12th degree in rectangular Cartesian coordinates; while a biradial of the 4th degree 
can be transformed into a quadric in Cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, when the 
biradial curves of the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th degrees are traced, they are found to be in 
series ; and in this case, apparently, the degree of the Cartesian equation (contrary to the 
general understanding of mathematicians on this subject) is not a criterion of the true 
order of the curve. 

Plate V. fig. 8, represents this series of curves, that of the 3rd degree being the 
nearest to the centre. The dotted curve is the biradial curve of the fractional degree 
7/2. Each curve is laid down from nine computed points for the quadrant. 

Equation (l) is the Oval of double symmetry. Its equation in ordinary polar 
coordinates reduces to a simple and easily remembered expression. Taking 0, the centre 
of the oval for the origin of Cartesian and polar coordinates (x, y, R, 0) ; OFj = OF 2 = c. 
For a point P in the curve, we have from the triangles OFjP, OF,P, 

r \ = OP- + OF 2 - 20Fj.OP.cos F x OP = E 2 + c 2 - 2cR cos 6 ; 
ri = OP 2 + OF 2 . + 20F 2 .OP.cos F,OP = E 2 + r + 2cE cos . 

In the expansions of r\, 7% the uneven terms of R cos disappear. Thus by trans- 
formation r\ + r\ = A 2 becomes 

( R 2 + v 1 - 2cE.cos 6) + (E 2 + c 2 + 2cE.cos 6) = A 2 , 
R 2 = (A 2 - 2c 2 )/2 , the circle. 

For the radial equation of the 4th degree we have 

r\ + r\ = A ; (R 2 + c 2 - 2cR.eos 0) 2 + (R 2 + c 2 + 2cE.cos Of = A 4 
(E 2 + c 2 ) 2 + 4c 2 R 2 cos 2 = A 4 /2 ; 

(x 2 + y 2 + c 2 ) + (2cxf = A 4 /2 .... (3). 

For the radial equation of the 6th degree we have 

r \ + r \ = A° ; (R 2 + c 2 - 2cE cos Of + (R 2 + c 2 + 2cR,cos Of = A 6 , 

(R 2 + c 2 ) 8 + (R 2 + c 2 )(2cR cos Of = A°/2 ; 
{x^y 2 + c 2 f + {.,?+ f + c 2 ){2cxf = A G j2 . . . . (4). 

Cognate polar equations may be formed in the same way for radial equations of any 
even degree, whence the equations in x and y may be written out. The equations are 
homogeneous functions of the composite quantities (x 2 + y 2 + c 2 ) and lex. 

If we write v t v 2 for these expressions, and solve the homogeneous equation in v^ 
for any point, we may then find x = v 2 /2c, and y= Jvx—x 1 —^. 






SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1093 

These equations do not presuppose any relation between A and c. Accordingly, by 
varying the distance of F and 0, the equation may be made to represent an oval from 
any two points on the major or minor axis taken as poles, and these poles may be either 
interior to, or on the oval, or (within certain limits) exterior to it. If a and b represent 
the lengths of the principal semi-axes of the oval, the limiting position of an exterior 
pole or focus is c = 2a, where the curve is reduced to a line. The limiting positions of 
interior poles or foci is of course c = 0, where the foci coincide, and the curve becomes a 
circle. 

The principal foci of the oval are determined under the same conditions as the foci of 
an ellipse ; by taking c 2 = cr — b 2 . Then, for the pair of equal radii drawn from the foci 
to the extremity of the minor axis, we have the relation )\ = r-> = a. If the major axis be 
taken as of unit value, then c 2 = (a 2 — 6 2 )/a 2 = e 2 , and the polar equations for the 4th and 
6th degree curves may be written 

R 4 +2e 8 K 2 (l + 2cos 2 0) = (A 4 ~2e 4 )/2 (5); 

R 6 +(3e 2 K 4 +3e 4 R 2 Xl+4cos 2 0) = (A 6 -2e 6 )/2 . . . (6), 

where e is the eccentricity estimated in the same manner as in the case of the ellipse, the 
cognate curve of the 2nd degree. And similarly for any curve of even degree in which 
the foci are properly taken. It may here be noticed that the equation K 2 (l + c 2 cos 2 6) = A 2 
represents an ellipse, because it may be immediately changed to y 2 + c 2 x 2 = A 2 . The ellipse 
then belongs to this family of curves, of which it is of course the lowest form. 
Plate V. fig. 4, represents the sextic curve having the equation 

^ + 15r{r 2 + 15r 2 r 4 + r!;=l, 

and referred to its principal foci. For its construction the values of rir 2 are used, which 
are transcribed in the ensuing table, p. 1096. But as the curve was to be referred to its 
principal foci, it was necessary to adopt as the maximum and minimum radii the pair of 
values whose sum is equal to twice the mean radius, r 21 . Hence the only available 
values were 

r 2 = f 7652 7115 6603 "6103 -5611 ) # 

r x =(-3569 -4108 -4623 "5122 5611 J * 



The curves here considered have a general resemblance to ellipses ; and if the equation 
in x-smd-y coordinates be referred to oblique axes, the curve resembles an ellipse referred 
to conjugate inclined axes. The greatest and least diameters are thus apparently conju- 
gate, but are not really so ; because it has been found impossible by analysis to reduce 
the locus of mid-points of parallel chords to a simple equation. It will be seen from 
Plate V. that the difference between the biradial curve of the 6th degree and the ellipse 
described on the same axes is very small, and it is probable that the class of homo- 

* These coordinates are very nearly the same as those of the ellipse described on the same axes. 



1094 HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 

geneous biradial curves may be resolved into functions of curves of the second degree 
with variable elements. 

Hitherto I have considered the radial curve as the geometrical expression of a homo- 
geneous radial equation of the simple form r? + 1 \ = A. It will now be shown that all 
symmetrical homogeneous equations in r x r. 2 of the same degree are identical curves, the 
eccentricity being dependent only on the choice of foci, or, which is the same thing, on 
the ratio of c to A. This identity is proved by transformation to polar coordinates. 
For this purpose, let r?.r£~ p and rl~ p .rf, be any pair of homologous terms of the 
symmetrical radial equation. If definite values be given to the indices n and p, and the 
transformation to polar coordinates be effected by the formula r 12 = R 2 c 2 ± 2Rc. cos 0, it 
will be found that, in the addition of the transformed terms, all the terms of uneven 
powers disappear, and that the resulting polar expression is identical with that obtained 
from the sum of the terms r\ and r%. Thus, from each pair of homologous terms we 
have the same polar expression multiplied by a coefficient, and the transformed homo- 
geneous symmetrical radial equation has the form already found for the equation of three 
terms, with a new value of A. 

Thus, if we transform the equation r\ + Vr\r\ + Vr\r\ + 7% = A G to polar coordinates, we 
obtain from the two extreme terms the terms of the left side of equation (4), which may 
be denoted by F^n) ; and from the mean terms we obtain P x F(r 1 ? , 2 ). The polar 
equation then is of the form (4) with the right-hand term divided by (P + l .), or 

as 
(R 2 + c 2 )s + (R 2 + c 2 )(2cR cos 6f = 



2P+2 



The proposition that the same curve or trace may be obtained from different homo- 
geneous equations of the same degree is illustrated by fig. (1). This figure, as is the 
case with all the illustrations, is drawn by tracing the curve through a series of com- 
puted points laid down on diagram paper, never less than nine points for a complete phase. 
This figure, when referred to the two marked exterior foci, satisfies the equation 
r\ + r\r\ + r\r\ + r\ = 1 ; and when referred to the two marked interior foci it satisfies the 
equation r\ + r\= 1. The computed values of r x and r 2 are those of the table, p. 1074, for 
the equations of these forms in x and y. 

If the homogeneous radial equation contains a middle term of even powers of i\r 2 , its 
equivalent in polar coordinates differs only from the expression found for a pair of 
homologous terms in having the negative sign prefixed to all the terms containing cos 2 0. 
I must, therefore, qualify the statement of the preceding paragraph by adding that, in 
the case of homogeneous equations of the 4th and 8th degrees (and generally where the 
index is divisible by 4), there are apparently two forms, one without and the other with 
a middle term. But it docs not appear that this variation can have any other effect than 
that of varying the coefficients of the terms multiplied by cosine 2 ^. The examples 
which I have worked out are confined to equations of the 6th degree, in which, of course, 
there is no middle term. 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 1095 

If the equation consists of only a middle term equated to unity, or o\'.r 2 2 = 1, this 
is immediately reducible to r\. r|= 1, which gives by transformation, 

(#2 + f + cj _ 4(^2 + yiy CQS 2 Q s 

the equation of the oval of Cassini. 

There is a curious relation between radial equations and equations of the same form 
in rectangular coordinates, which is connected with the value of the coefficients. 

It has been seen (p. 1072), in the case of the sextic equation of positive even powers 
of x and y, ( 1) that if P, the coefficient of the pair of intermediate terms be = 3, the curve 
is a limiting circle ; (2) that by varying P from to 3 we obtain every form of the non- 
inflexional oval ; and (3) that for values of P exceeding 3 and less than 15, or n(n — 1)/2, 
we obtain the same series of curves turned round through an angle of 45°. In the case 
of the sextic radial equation of positive even powers of i\ r 2 , if P, the coefficient of the 
pair of intermediate terms = 3, the curve also reduces to the circle (rl + rl = 1). If P be 
less than 3, the radial equation represents a curve referred to foci, or poles, in the line of 
the minor axis, which may be either interior or exterior or on the curve (see figs. 1 
and 2) ; and this includes the case of the equation of three terms, where P = 0. But, if P 
exceeds 3, the radial equation represents a curve referred to foci, or poles, in the line of 
the major axis, which may be either interior or exterior or on the curve; and this includes 
the case of the curve referred to its principal foci. 

It appeared to me that the radial curves, as traced, were a little more rounded at the 
apses than ellipses, and this impression has been confirmed by the numerical computation 
and comparison of the forms of the ellipse and of the sextic oval described on identical 
major and minor axes, which will be immediately given. It would be interesting to make 
a cognate comparison for elliptic ovals of different degrees. There are two ways in which 
such a comparison may be instituted. 

(1) If the vertices of the curves be taken for foci, or poles of radial coordinates, the 
arbitrary term is then a parameter, and a series of curves of different degrees may be 
described upon the same principal axes, a and b. (2) If the foci of the normal position 
(c 2 = a 2 — 6 2 ) be taken for poles, it is difficult to prearrange the equations so that the 
curves to be formed shall have the same amplitude. We may, however, compute each 
curve independently, and compare it with the ellipse described on the same axes, and 
thus find out for the curve of any degree how far its coordinates differ from those of the 
ellipse of equal amplitude. In either case, it is necessary to reduce the radial coordinates 
to rectangular. This is easily done. Keferring to p. 1092, we see that 

/y& /y*% 

T \ — Ti = 4eRcos0 = 4ca;; •'• x =~^ — 
Also, 

rl+ri=2(x i +y 2 +cy, .: ,/ = *!±^ _ (^ + e 2 ) • 



1096 



HON. LORD M'LAREN ON SYSTEMS OF 



To determine a and b, and c (the distance between the foci), we may denote by 
?■(,,.' r 01 the greatest and least radial coordinates, being those which are drawn to the 
extremities of the axis of X; and by r 2)1 the radii of equal length, being those which are 
drawn to the extremities of the axis of Y. Then, 



For any interior foci, 



,, _ ' 02 *01 ,, _ r 2 "r r Ql 



For exterior foci, 



rp _1_ fy (Y* ry 

— 02 ' ' 01 . n _ '02 M)l 



C = 



For foci on the curve, . . . 



• ^oi = °; c = a=-&; 



For foci in the normal position r 02 +r 01 = 2r 21 = 2«; and r 21 — r 01 =c; 



In all cases, 



b= V r 2i 2 — ' 



Values of a, b, c, x and y being thus found for the elliptic oval of any degree from its 
radial coordinates r x i\, the comparison with the ellipses described on the same axes is 
made by taking identical values of x (or x = x'), and thence computing the relative 
values of 



'->-£ 



.r- . 



Such a comparison has been made for the curve r 6 + I5r\r'i+ I5rl'>i + r. 2 = 1, and the 
ellipse having the same axes, a and b ; and the values of y and y' to the argument x = x' ', 
together with the difference (A =y — y') are given in the subjoined table. Exact values 
of i\r., were found by the homogeneous method, whence exact values of x, y, and y' were 
found by the preceding formulae. Taking the highest and lowest computed values of 
r. 2 i\ for the axial radii, and with interior foci, we have J" 02 = '9367 ; r m = '1651 ; c = '3858 ; 
a= '5509 ; b = '4075. From these elements and the tabular values of r., and r u the cor- 
responding values of x, y, and y' are as in the annexed table. 



Arguments, < 


•9367 
1651 


•8798 
•2358 


•8215 
•2990 


•7652 
•3569 


•7115 

•4108 


•6603 

•4623 


•6103 
•5122 


5611 
•561 1 


x = x 


•5509 


•4656 


•3794 


•2970 


•2187 


•1440 


0715 


o-o 


Sextic Oval, y 


00 


•2218 


•2986 


•3455 


•3754 


•3941 


•4043 


•4075 


Ellipse, y 


00 


•2178 


•2954 


•3432 


•3741 


•3932 


•4040 


•4075 


A =(</-?/) 


00 


•0040 


0032 


•0023 


0013 


0009 


•0002 


o-o 



SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 



1097 



When the eccentricity is increased by giving a different value to c, the difference 
between the y coordinates of the oval and the ellipse also increases, as shown in the 
following table, where r 02 = '9819 ; r m = '0859 ; c = '4480 ; a = '5339 ; b = '3380 ; other 
values of r, r. 2 being as above. 



x = x 


•5339 


•4743 


•4009 


•3267 


•2577 


■1882 


1240 


0615 


00 


y 


00 


1634 


2313 


•2733 


•3007 


•3184 


•3298 


•3362 


3380 


y' 


00 


1550 


2232 


•2670 


■2967 


3162 


•3287 


3357 


•3380 


A = (y -y') 


00 


0084 


0081 


•0063 


0030 


0022 


0011 


0005 


0000 



In PL IV. fig. 6, the exterior curve of each pair represents the sextic oval, and the 
interior curve the ellipse, as traced through the points here given. 

Further researches as to the properties of elliptic ovals may be expected to yield 
interesting results ; and it appears to me that these curves, and the curves obtained from 
them by linear transformation, are capable of expressing the facts of a certain class of 
physical problems with greater accuracy than is obtainable by the tables at present in 
use for the purpose. 

The three curves shown in Plate V. fig. 6, are linear transformations of the sym- 
metrical oval. Their equation is 9^/\+^//* = l; \ was taken =1; and /x. was taken 
successively = 2, \ and f to obtain the three curves. In the diagram each curve is con- 
nected with its foci by lines drawn for the purpose. The same equation with different 
values of either c or /x gives a different curve, as the figure shows. The complete 
equation is 



A" \»- 



n 



M 



I+ + 



/•:; 



= A" 



and the curve may be described as the Oval of single symmetry. The Cartesian oval is 
a limiting form of the oval of single symmetry of the 4th degree, as may be verified by 
twice squaring its equation r x j\ + r.,jfju = A. 

The curves formed by giving negative values to one of the quantities, or to one of 
each pair of homologous terms, are remarkable for their varied and fantastic forms ; but 
I have not been able to discover any properties which are common to the class. 

The curve of the symmetrical equation r% — r\ = A (shown in PL V. fig. 5) is an 
inflexional curve of two branches. Each branch crosses the axis of X, and is symmetrical 
on either side of it ; after being inflected on either side, the branches continue to 
approach to the asymptote Y, which accordingly has double contact with the curve at 
the point infinity and also at negative infinity. Generally, for the symmetric radial 
equation of any number of terms of even powers, I have found (1) in the form (j3) or 

( H h ), if the coefficients of the intermediate terms are fractional, the curve is an 

oval entirely concave to the centre ; (2) if the coefficient (in the form /3) exceed unity 



1098 SOLUTIONS OF HOMOGENEOUS AND CENTRAL EQUATIONS. 

the curve is of the form last described (PI. V. fig. 5), having the axis of Y for its 

asymptote ; (3) in the forms (e) and (£), or (H 1 — ) and (+ H ), the curve is of 

the same form, having the axis of Y for its asymptote. The linear transformation of the 
radial equation with negative terms has been found to be a closed curve in all the 
examples I have tried ; it apparently only becomes asymptotic when the coefficients 
X and jjl are equal. The oval and the mushroom-like forms of Plate V. fig. 7, are traced 
from the equation rJ/\ - rl/p = 1 by giving different values to /i and c. 

It is easily seen that in the case of bi-radial curves with diverse coefficients, \ and /x, the 
transformation to polar coordinates will not give rise to a simplified expression, because 
the uneven terms of the expansions do not disappear. The equations in x and y contain 
in general all the even powers of y and all the powers, even and uneven, of x, and are 
similar in form to those which have been considered as resulting from an oblique section 
of a central surface parallel to a plane through one of its axes of symmetry. 



Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV. 



LORD MHAREN ON HOMOGENEOUS EQUATIONS-POSITIVE SYMMETRY. -Plate I. 




Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV. 



LORD M C LAREN ON HOMOGENEOUS EQUATIONS-NEGATIVE SYMMETRY.--Pi.atk 




A. Ritcftie $■ Son, Photo- litfc. 



Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV 

LORD M°LAREN ON EQUATIONS OF TWO HOMOGENEOUS PARTS. Plate III. 




A. Ritchie fr Son. Photo- lith. 






Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV. 

LORD MHAREN ON EQUATIONS OF SINGLE, OR IMPERFECT SYMMETRY. Plate IV. 




A. Ritchie f Sort, Photo- Lith.. 






Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV. 



LORD MHAREN ON EIRADIAL EQUATIONS.--Plate v. 

Figure 3. 




Figure 



Figure 



A. Ritchie f Son, Photo- LitA.. 



Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin. Vol.XXXV. 

LORD M C LAREN ON CONTOUR-LINES OF SURFACES-HOMOGENEOUS EQUATIONS. --Plate VI. 




A. Ritchie f Son, Photo- Lith.. 



APPENDIX. 



TRANSACTIONS 



OF THE 



EOYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH. 






VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 8 D 



CONTENTS. 



THE COUNCIL OF THE SOCIETY, 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS, . 

LIST OF HONORARY FELLOWS, 

LIST OF ORDINARY FELLOWS ELECTED DURING SESSION 1887-88 

LIST OF ORDINARY FELLOWS ELECTED DURING SESSION 1888-89 

LAWS OF THE SOCIETY, 

THE KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES, 

AWARDS OF THE KEITH, MAKDOUGALL-BRISBANE, AND NEILL PRIZES, 
FROM 1827 TO 1888, AND OF THE VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZE, IN 1887, 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATUTORY GENERAL MEETINGS, . 

LIST OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS AND INDIVIDUALS ENTITLED TO RECEIVE 
COPIES OF THE TRANSACTIONS AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL 
SOCIETY, .......... 

INDEX, 



PAGE 

1102 
1103 
1118 
1120 
1122 
1125 
1132 

1135 
1139 

1145 
1151 






LIST OF MEMBERS. 



COUNCIL, 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ORDINARY FELLOWS, 

AND LIST OF HONORARY FELLOWS, 

At November 1889. 



THE COUNCIL 



OF 



THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH, 



NOVEMBER 1889. 



PRESIDENT. 

Sir WILLIAM THOMSON, LL.D., D.C.L., Grand Officer of the Legion of 
Honour of France, Member of the Prussian Order Pour le Merite, F R.S., 
Foreign Associate of the Institute of France, Regius Professor of Natural 
Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS, HAVING FILLED THE OFFICE OF PRESIDENT. 

His Grace the DUKE of ARGYLL, K.G., K.T., D.C.L. Oxon., LL.D., F.R.S., F.G.S. 
The Right Hon. Lord MONCREIFF, of Tullibole, LL.D. 

VICE-P RESIDENTS. 

Sir DOUGLAS MACLAGAN, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

in the University of Edinburgh. 
The Hon. Lord MACLAREN, LL.D. Edin. and Glas., F.R.A.S., one of the Senators of 

the College of Justice. 
The Rev. Professor FLINT, D.D., Corresponding Member of the Institute of France. 
GEORGE CHRYSTAL, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics in the University of 

Edinburgh. 
THOMAS MUIR, M.A., LL.D., Mathematical Master in the High School of Glasgow. 
Sir ARTHUR MITCHELL, K.C.B., M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., LL.D., Commissioner in 

Lunacy. 

GENERAL SECRETARY. 

P. GUTHRIE TAIT, M.A., Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. 

SECRETARIES TO ORDINARY MEETINGS. 

Sir WILLIAM TURNER, M.B., LL.D., F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S., Professor of Anatomy in 

the University of Edinburgh. 
ALEXANDER CRUM BROWN, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.C.P.E., F.R.S., Professor of 

Chemistry in the University of Edinburgh. 

TREASURER. 

ADAM GILLIES SMITH, Esq., C.A. 

CURATOR OF LIBRARY AND MUSEUM. 

ALEXANDER BUCHAN, Esq., M.A., LL.D., Secretary to the Scottish Meteorological Society. 

COUNCILLORS. 

J. BATTY TUKE, M.D., F.RC.P.E. | JAMES GEIKIE, LL.D., F.R.S., F.G.S., Pro- 



FREDERICK O. BOWER, M.A., F.L.S., Regius 
Professor of Botany in the University of 
Glasgow. 

GKRMAN SIMS WOODHEAD, M.D., 
F.R.C.P.E. 

ROBERT COX, Esq. of Gorgie. M.A. 

ISAAC BAYLEY BALFOUR, D.Sc, M.D., 
CM., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Edinburgh. 

. I AMES ALFRED EWING, B.Sc, F.R.S., Pro- 
fessor of Engineering and Drawing in Uni- 
versity College, Dundee. 

WILLIAM JACK, M.A., LL.D., Professor of 
Mathematics in the University of Glasgow. 



fessor of Geology in the University of 

Edinburgh. 
W. H. PERKIN, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

in the Heriot-Watt College. 
A. BEATSON BELL, Chairman of the Prison 

Commission, Scotland. 
The Right Hon. Lord KINGSBURGH, C.B., 

LL.D., F.R.S., M.S.T.E. and E., Lord 

Justice-Clerk, and Lord President of the 

Second Division of the Court of Session. 
JOHN MURRAY, LL.D., Ph.D., Director of 

the Challenger Expedition Commission. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 



OF 



THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY, 



CORRECTED TO NOVEMBER 1889. 



N.B. — Tliose marked * are Annual Contributors 



B. prefixed to a 

K. 

N. 

V. J. 

P. 



indicates that the Fellow has received a Makdougall-Brisbane Medal. 
,, ,, Keith Medal. 

,, ■ ,, Feill Medal. 

,, ,, the Victoria Jubilee Prize. 

,, ,, contributed one or more Papers to the Transactions. 



Date of 
Election 

1879 
1871 

1888 

1881 



1878 
1875 
1889 

1888 
1878 

1856 

1886 
1874 



1883 
1883 
1881 



K. P. 



B. P, 



Abernethy, Jas., Memb. Inst. C.E., Prince of Wales Terrace, Kensington 

* Agnew, Stair, C.B., M.A., Registrar-General for Scotland, 22 Buckingham Terrace 

* Aikman, C. M., M.A., B.Sc, F.I.C., F.C.S., Lecturer on Agricultural Chemistry in Glasgow 

and West of Scotland Technical College, 183 St Vincent Street, Glasgow 
Aitchison, James Edward Tierney, CLE., M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., F.L.S., Brigade-Surgeon, 
retired, H.M. Bengal Army; F.R.C.S. Edin., M.R.C.P. Edin., Corresp. Fell. Obstet. 
Soc. Edin., 20 Chester Street 

* Aitken, Andrew Peebles, M.A., Sc.D., F.I.C., 57 Great King Street 5 

* Aitken, John, F.R.S., Darroch, Falkirk 

* Alison, John, M.A., Secretary to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, 33 Woodbum 

Terrace 

* Allardice, R. E, M.A., 16 Nile Grove, Morningside 

Allchin, W. H., M.B., F.R.C.P.L., Physician to the Westminster Hospital, 5 Chandos 

Street, Cavendish Square, London 
Allman, George J., M.D., F.R.S., M.R.I.A, F.L.S., Emeritus Professor of Natural History, 

University of Edinburgh, Ardmore, Parkstone, Dorset 10 

* Anderson, Arthur, M.D., C.B., Ex-Inspector-General of Hospitals, Pitlochry 

Anderson, John, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S.,late Superintendent of the Indian Museum and Pro- 
fessor of Comparative Anatomy in the Medical College, Calcutta, 71 Harrington 
Gardens, London 

* Anderson, Robert Rowand, LL.D., 19 St Andrew Square 

Andrews, Thomas, Memb. Inst. C.E., F.R.S., F.C.S., Ravencrag, Wortley, near Sheffield 
Anglin, A. H, M.A., LL.D., M.R.I.A., Professor of Mathematics, Queen's College, 
Cork 15 



1104 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 
Klection 

1867 



1883 
1886 
1849 

1887 

1885 
1879 
1875 
1879 
1877 

1870 
1889 
1886 
1872 
1883 
1887 
1882 
1874 
1889 



1887 
1857 
1880 
1888 

1882 

1887 
1886 
1874 
1888 

1887 
1875 
1881 
1880 

1884 
1850 

1863 



P. 



P. 



P. 



* Annan dale, Thomas, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Clinical Surgery in the University of 

Edinburgh, 34 Charlotte Square 
Archibald, John, M.D., CM., F.R.C.S.E., Woodhouse-Eaves, Loughborough 

* Armstrong, George Frederick, Professor of Engineering in the University of Edinburgh 
Argyll, His Grace the Duke of, E.G., K.T., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S. (Hon. Vice-Pres.), 

Inveraray Castle 

* Ashdown, Herbert H, M.B., 49 Upper Bedford Place, Russell Square, London 20 

*Baildon, H. Bellyse, B.A., Duncliffe, Murrayfield, Edinburgh 

* Bailey, James Lambert, Royal Bank of Scotland, Ardrossan 

* Bain, Sir James, 3 Park Terrace, Glasgow 

* Balfour, George W., M.D., LL.D., F.R.C.P.E., 7 Walker Street 

* Balfour, I. Bayley, Sc.D., M.D., CM., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the University of 

Edinburgh 25 

* Balfour, Thomas A. G., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 51 George Square 

* Barbour, A. H. F., M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 24 Melville Street 

* Barclay, A. J. G., M.A., 5 Ethel Terrace 

* Barclay, George, M.A., 17 Coates Crescent 

* Barclay, G. W. W., M.A., 40 Princes Street 30 
Barlow, W. H, Memb. Inst. C.E., High Combe, Old Charlton, Kent 

Barnes, Henry, M.D., 6 Portland Square, Carlisle 

Barrett, William F., M.R.I.A., Professor of Physics, Royal College of Science, Dublin 
Barry, T. D. Collis, Staff Surgeon, M.R.C.S., F.L.S., Prof, of Chemistry and Medical Juris- 
prudence to the Grant Medical College, Bombay, and Acting Chemical Adviser to the 
Indian Government 

* Bartholomew, J. G., F.R.G.S., 12 Blacket Place 35 
Batten, Edmund Chisholm, of Aigas, M.A., Thornfaulcon, near Taunton, Somerset 

* Bayly, General John, C.B., R.E., 58 Palmerston Place 

* Beare, Thomas Hudson, B.Sc, Assoc. Memb. Inst. C.E., Professor of Engineering and 

Mechanical Technology in University College, Gower Street, London 
Beddard, Frank E., M.A. Oxon., Prosector to the Zoological Society of London, Zoological 
Society's Gardens, Regent's Park, London 

* Begg, Ferdinand Faithful, 13 Earl's Court Square, London, S.W. 40 

* Bell, A. Beatson, Chairman of Prison Commission, 143 Princes Street 

* BeU, Joseph, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., 2 Melville Crescent 

* Bell, William James, of Scatwell, B.A., LL.M., F.C.S., Barrister-at-Law, Scatwell, Muir 

of Ord, and 1 Plowden Buildings, Temple, London 

* Bernard, J. Mackay, 25 Chester Street 

Uernstein, Ludwik, M.D., Lismore, New South Wales 45 

* Berry, Walter, K.D., Danish Consul-General, 11 Atholl Crescent 

* Birch, De Burgh, M.D., Professor of Physiology, Yorkshire College, Victoria University, 

16 De Grey Terrace, Leeds 

* Black, Rev. John S., 6 Oxford Terrace 

Blackburn, Hugh, M.A., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Mathematics in the University of 

Glasgow, Roshven, Ardgour 
Blackie, John S., Emeritus Professor of Greek in the University of Edinburgh, 9 Douglas 

Crescent 50 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1105 



Date of 
Election. 

1862 



1878 
1884 
1872 

1869 
1886 

1884 

1871 
1873 

1886 
1886 
1877 
1888 
1887 
1864 

1881 
1883 
1885 
1861 
1870 

1883 
1878 
1867 
1888 
1869 

1870 

1882 

1887 
1887 
1888 
1887 
1883 

1887 
1869 

1879 

1878 



K. B 
P. 



B. P. 



K.P. 



Blaikie, The Rev. W. Garden, M.A., D.D., LL.D., Professor of Apologetics and Pastoral 
Theology, New College, Edinburgh, 9 Palmerston Road 

* Blyth, James, M.A., Professor of Natural Philosophy in Anderson's College, Glasgow 
Bond, Francis T, M.D., B.A., M.RC.S., 1 Beaufort Buildings, Spa, Gloucester 

* Bottomley, J. Thomson, MA., F.R.S., F.C.S., Lecturer on Natural Philosophy in the Uni- 

versity of Glasgow, 1 3 University Gardens, Glasgow 

* Bow, Robert Henry, C.E., 7 South Gray Street 55 

* Bower, Frederick O., MA., F.L.S., Regius Professor of Botany in the University of Glas- 

gow, 45 Kerrsland Terrace, Hillhead, Glasgow 
Bowman, Frederick Hungerford, D.Sc, F.R.A.S., F.C.S., F.L.S., F.G.S., West Mount, 
Halifax, Yorkshire 

* Boyd, Sir Thomas J., Chairman of the Scottish Fishery Board, 41 Moray Place 

* Boyd, William, M. A, Peterhead 

* Bramwell, Byrom, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 23 Drumsheugh Gardens 60 
Brittle, John Richard, Memb. Inst. C.E., Vanbrugh Hill, Blackheath, Kent 

Broadrick, George, Memb. Inst. C.E., Hamphall, Stubs, near Doncaster 

* Brook, George, F. L. S. , Lecturer on Comparative Embryology in the University of Edinburgh 

* Brown, A. B., C.E., 19 Douglas Crescent 

Brown, Alex. Crum, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.C.P.E., F.R.S. (Secretary), Professor of Chemistry 
in the University of Edinburgh, 8 Belgrave Crescent 65 

* Brown, J. A. Harvie, of Quarter, Dunipace House, Larbert, Stirlingshire 

* Brown, J. Graham, M.D., CM., F.R.C.P.E., 16 Ainslie Place 

* Brown, J. Macdonald, M.B., F.R.C.S.E., Apsley Lodge, 12 South Mansionhouse Road 
Brown, Rev. Thomas, D.D., 16 Carlton Street 

Browne, Sir James Crichton, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., 7 Cumberland Terrace, Regent's Park, 
London 70 

* Bruce, Alexander, M.A., M.B., M.R.C.P.E., 13 Alva Street 
Brunlees, Sir James, Memb. Inst. C.E., 5 Victoria Street, Westminster 

* Bryce, A. H, LL.D., D.C.L., 42 Moray Place 

* Bryson, William A., Electrical Engineer, 196 St Vincent Street, Glasgow 

* Buchan, Alexander, M.A., LL.D., Secretary to the Scottish Meteorological Society 

(Curator of Library), 72 Northumberland Street 75 

* Buchanan, John Young, M. A, F.R.S. , 10 Moray PL, Edinburgh, and Christ's Coll., Cambridge 

* Buchanan, T. R., M.A., M.P. for the West Division of the City of Edinburgh, 10 Moray 

Place, Edinburgh, and 36 Upper Brook Street, London 

* Buist, J.B., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 1 Clifton Terrace 

* Burnet, John James, Architect, 1 Granby Place, Hillhead, Glasgow 

* Burns, Rev. T, F.S.A. Scot., Minister of Lady Glenorchy's Parish Church, 13 Cumin PL 80 

* Burton, Cosmo Innes, B.Sc, F.C.S., 7 Montpelier, Viewforth, Edinburgh 

* Butcher, S. H, M.A., LL.D., Prof, of Greek in the University of Edin., 27 Palmerston PL 

* Cadell, Henry Moubray, of Grange, Bo'ness, B.Sc. 

* Calderwood, Rev. H, LL.D., Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University of Edin- 

burgh, Napier Road, Merchiston 

* Calderwood, John, F.I.C., Belmont Works, Battersea, and Gowanlea, Spencer Park, Wands- 

worth, London, S.W. 85 

Campbell, John Archibald, M.D., Garland's Asylum, Carlisle 



1106 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Data • ( 
Election. 

1874 
1882 
1876 

1866 
1874 

1875 

1872 
1880 

1875 
1886 
1863 

1875 
1882 

1887 
1888 
1886 
1872 
1879 
1875 

1886 
1887 
1887 
1878 

1886 
1877 
1884 
1871 

1885 
1867 
1884 

1870 
1876 
1869 



1884 
1888 
1876 



K. P. 



Carrington, Benjamin, M.D., Eccles, Lancashire 

* Cay, W. Dyce, Memb. Inst. C.E., 107a Princes Street 

*Cazenove, The Rev. John Gibson, M.A., D.D., 22 Alva Street, Chancellor of St Mary's 
Cathedral 

* Chalmers, David, RedhaU, Slateford 90 

* Chiene, John, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Surgery in the University of Edinburgh, 

26 Charlotte Square 

* Christie, John, 19 Buckingham Terrace 

Christie, Thomas B., M.D., F.RC.P.E., Royal India Asylum, Ealing, London 

* Chrystal, George, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics in the University of Edinburgh 

(Vice-President), 5 Belgrave Crescent 

* Clark, Robert, 7 Learmonth Terrace 95 

* Clark, Sir Thomas, Bart., 11 Melville Crescent 

Cleghorn, Hugh F. C, of Stravithie, M.D., LL.D., F.L.S., St Andrews, United Service 
Club, 14 Queen Street 

* Clouston, T. S., M.D., F.RC.P.E., Tipperlin House, Morningside 

* Coats, Sir Peter, of Auchendrane, President of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Horti- 

cultural Society, Auchendrane, Ayr 

* Cockburn, John, F.R.A.S., 6 Atholl Crescent 100 
Collie, John Norman, Ph.D., F.C.S., University College, London 

Connan, Daniel M., M.A., Education Department, Cape of Good Hope 

* Constable, Archibald, 1 1 Thistle Street 

* Cox, Robert, of Gorgie, M.A., 34 Drumsheugh Gardens 

* Craig, William, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., F.R.C.S.E., Lecturer on Materia Medica to the College 

of Surgeons, 7 Bruntsfield Place 105 

* Croom, John Halliday, M.D., F.RC.P.E., 25 Charlotte Square 

* Crawford, William Caldwell, Lockharton Gardens, Slateford, Edinburgh 

* Cumming, A S., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 18 Ainslie Place 

* Cunningham, Daniel John, M.D., Professor of Anatomy in Trinity College, 69 Harcourt 

Street, Dublin 

* Cunningham, David, Memb. Inst. C.E., Harbour Chambers, Dock Street, Dundee 110 

* Cunningham, George Miller, Memb. Inst. C.E., 2 Ainslie Place 

* Cunningham, J. T., B.A., Marine Biological Laboratory, Plymouth 

* Cunynghame, R. J. Blair, M.D., 18 Rothesay Place 

*Daniell, Alfred, M.A., LL.B., D.Sc, Advocate, 3 Great King Street 

* Davidson, David, Somerset Lodge, Wimbledon Common, Wimbledon 115 
Davy, Richard, F.R.C.S., Surgeon to the Westminster Hospital, 33Welbeck St. , Cavendish 

Square, London 

* Day, St John Vincent, C.E. 

* Denny, Peter, Memb. Inst. C.E., Dumbarton 

* Dewar, James, M.A., F.R.S., Jacksonian Prof essor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy 

in the University of Cambridge, and Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal 
Institution of Great Britain, London 

* Dickson, Charles Scott, Advocate, 4 Heriot Row 1 20 

* Dickson, H. N, 38 York Place 

* Dickson, J. D. Hamilton, M.A., Fellow and Tutor, St Peter's College, Cambridge 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1107 



Date of 
Electiou. 

1863 P. Dittmar, W., LL.D., F.RS., Professor of Chemistry, Anderson's College, 11 Hillhead 

Street, Glasgow 
1885 Dixon, J. M., MA., Prof, of English Literature in the University of Tokio, Japan 

1881 * Dobbin, Leonard, Ph.D., 16 Kilmaurs Road 125 

1867 P. * Donaldson, J., M.A., LL.D., Principal of the United College of St Salvador and St Leonard, 

St Andrews 

1882 * Dott, D. B., Memb. Pharm. Soc., 7 Victoria Terrace, Musselburgh 
1866 * Douglas, David, 22 Drummond Place 

1880 * Drummond, Henry, F.G.S., Professor of Natural History in the Free Church College, 3 Park 

Circus, Glasgow 
1860 Dudgeon, Patrick, of Cargen, Dumfries 130 

1863 P. Duncan, J. Matthews, M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.E. (Lond. and Edin.), LL.D, F.R.S., 71 Brook 

Street, London 
1876 * Duncan, James, of Benmore, Kilmun, 9 Mincing Lane, London 

1889 * Duncan, James Dalrymple, F.S.A. Scot., 211 Hope Street, Glasgow 

1870 * Duncan, John, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., F.R.C.S.E, 8 Ainslie Place 

1878 * Duncanson, J. J. Kirk, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 22 Drumsheugh Gardens 135 
1859 Duns, Rev. Professor, D.D., New College, Edinburgh, 14 Greenhill Place 

1888 * Durham, James, F.G.S., Wingate Place, Newport, Fife 

1874 * Durham, William, Seaforth House, Portobello 

1869 * Elder, George, Knock Castle, Wemyss Bay, Greenock 

1885 *Elgar, Francis, Memb. Inst. C.E., LL.D., The Admiralty, London 140 

1875 Elliot, Daniel G, New York 

1880 * Elliot, T. Armstrong, M.A., 6 Sanderson Road, Newcastle-on-Tyne 

1855 Etheridge, Robert, F.R.S., Assistant-Keeper of the Geological Department at the British 

Museum of Natural History, 14 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London 
1884 * Evans, William, F.F.A., Secretary Royal Physical Soc, 18a Morningside Park, Edinburgh 

1863 P. Everett, J. D., M.A., D.C.L., F.R.S., Prof, of Nat. Philosophy, Queen's Coll., Belfast 145 

1879 * Ewart, James Cossar, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Natural History, University of Edin- 

burgh, 2 Belford Park 
1878 P. * Ewing, James Alfred, B.Sc, F.R.S., Professor of Engineering and Drawing in University 
College, Dundee 

1875 Fairley, Thomas, Lecturer on Chemistry, 8 Newton Grove, Leeds 
1888 P. * Fawsitt, Charles A., 4 Maule Terrace, Partick, Glasgow 

1859 Fayrer, Sir Joseph, K.C.S.I., M.D., F.R.C.P.L., F.R.C.S.L. andE., LL.D., F.R.S., Honorary 

Physician to the Queen, 53 Wimpole Street, London 150 

1883 * Felkin, Robert W., M.D., F.R.G.S., Fellow of the Anthropological Society of Berlin, 

20 Alva Street, Edinburgh 
1888 * Ferguson, John, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry in the University of Glasgow 

1868 * Ferguson, Robert M., Ph.D., 12 Moray Place 

1874 * Ferguson, William, of Kinmundy, F.L.S., F.G.S., Kinmundy House, Mintlaw 

1886 Field, C. Leopold, F.C.S., Upper Marsh, Lambeth, London 155 
1852 Fleming, Andrew, M.D., Deputy Surgeon-General, 3 Napier Road 

1876 * Fleming, J. S., 16 Grosvenor Crescent 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 8 E 






1108 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 

Election 

1880 



1872 

1859 
1828 
1887 

1858 

1867 

1885 

1888 
1867 
1889 
1880 

1861 

1871 

1881 
1877 
1885 

1887 
1879 

1880 
1850 
1867 
1880 
1851 
1883 
1880 
1886 

1884 
1886 

1883 

1888 



B.P. 



B.P. 



B. P. 



* Flint, Robert, D.D., Corresponding Member of the Institute of France, Corresponding 

Member of the Royal Academy of Sciences of Palermo, Professor of Divinity in the 
University of Edinburgh (Vice-President), Johnstone Lodge, 54 Craigmillar Park 

Forbes, Professor George, M.A., Memb. Inst. C.E., M.S.T.E. and K, F.R.S., F.R.A.S., 34 
Great George Street, Westminster 

Forlong, Major-Gen. J. G., F.R.G.S., R.A.S., Assoc. C.E., &c, 11 Douglas Crescent 160 

Foster, John, Liverpool 

Fowler, Sir John, Bart., K.C.M.G., Memb. Inst. C.E., LL.D., Thornwood Lodge, Kensing- 
ton, London 

Fraser, A. Campbell, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in the 
University of Edinburgh, Gorton House, Hawthornden 

* Fraser, Thomas R., M.D., F.R.C.P.E, F.R.S., Professor of Materia Medica in the University 

of Edinburgh, 13 Drumsheugh Gardens 

* Fraser, A. Y., M.A., care of Dr Kennedy, 25 Newington Road, Edinburgh 165 

* Gait, Alexander, B.Sc, F.C.S., Gowanbrae, Dunoon 
Gayner, Charles, M.D., Oxford 

* Geddes, George H., Mining Engineer, 8 Douglas Crescent 

* Geddes, Patrick, Professor of Botany in University College, Dundee, and Lecturer on 

Zoology, 6 James' Court, Lawnmarket 
Geikie, Archibald, LL.D., F.R.S., F.G.S., Corresponding Member of the Royal Academy 
of Berlin, Director of the Geological Surveys of Great Britain, and Head of the Geolo- 
gical Museum, 28 Jermyn Street, London 170 

* Geikie, James, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., F.G.S., Professor of Geology in the University of 

Edinburgh, 31 Merchiston Avenue 

* Gibson, G. A., D.Sc, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 17 Alva Street 

* Gibson, John, Ph.D., 15 Dick Place 

* Gibson, R. J. Harvey, M.A., Lecturer on Botany, Victoria University, 44 Sydenham 

Avenue, Sefton Park, Liverpool 

* Gilmour, William, 10 Elm Row 175 

* Gilray, Thomas, M.A., Professor of English Language and Literature in the University of 

Otago, New Zealand 

* Gilruth, George Ritchie, Surgeon, 48 Northumberland Street 

Gosset, Major-General W. D., R.E., 70 Edith Road, West Kensington, London 

* Graham, Andrew, M.D., R.N., Army and Navy Club, 36 Pall Mall, London 

* Graham, James, 198 West George Street, Glasgow 180 
Grant, The Rev. James, D.D., D.C.L., 15 Palmerston Place 

*Gray, Andrew, M.A., Professor of Physics in University College, Bangor, North Wales 
Gray, Thomas, B.Sc, Professor of Physics, Rose Polytechnic Institute, Indiana, U.S. 

* Greenfield, W. S., M.D., Professor of General Pathology in the University of Edinburgh, 

7 Heriot Row 

* Grieve, John, M.A., M.D., F.L.S., 212 St Vincent Street, Glasgow 185 

* Griffiths, Arthur Bower, Ph.D., Lecturer on Chemistry in the School of Science of the City 

and County of Lincoln, Richmond House, Charlotte Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham 
Gunning, R H, Grand Dignitary of the Order of the Rose of Brazil, M.D., LL.D., 12 

Addison Crescent, Kensington 
Guppy, Henry Brougham, M.B., 17 Woodlane, Falmouth 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OP THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1109 



Date of 
Election. 




1886 




1867 




1881 


P. 


1876 


P. 


1886 




1888 




1869 




1877 




1875 




1880 


P. 


1870 




1862 




1876 


K. P. 


1884 




1881 


N. P. 


1889 




1871 




1859 




1879 




1885 




1828 


P. 


1881 


P. 


1883 


P. 


1886 




1872 




1887 




1887 




1864 




1855 




1882 




1874 




1886 




1875 





* Haddington, The Right Hon. the Earl of, Tyninghame House, Haddington 

*Hallen, James H B., F.R.C.S.E., F.R.P.S.E., Inspecting Veterinary Surgeon in H.M. 
Indian Army, Pebworth, near Stratford-on-Avon 190 

* Hamilton, D. J., M.B., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Pathological Anatomy in the University 

of Aberdeen, 1a Albyn Place, Aberdeen 

* Hannay, J. Ballantyne, Cove Castle, Loch Long 

* Hare, Arthur W., M.B., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Surgery, Owens College, 3 Adelphi Terrace, 

Salford, Manchester 

* Hart, D. Berry, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 29 Charlotte Square 

Hartley, Sir Charles A., K.C.M.G., Memb. Inst. C.E., 26 Pall MaU, London 195 

Hartley, Walter Noel, F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry, Royal College of Science for Ireland, 

Dublin 
Hawkshaw, Sir John, Memb. Inst. C.E., F.R.S., F.G.S., 33 Great George Street, West- 
minster 

* Haycraft, J. Berry, M.D., D.Sc, Lecturer on Physiology in the University of Edinburgh, 

20 Ann Street 
Heathfield, W. E, F.C.S., 1 Powis Grove, Brighton 
Hector, Sir James, K.C.M.G., M.D., F.R.S., Director of the Geological Survey, Wellington, 

New Zealand 200 

* Heddle, M. Forster, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry in the University of St Andrews 

* Henderson, John, jun., Meadowside Works, Partick, Glasgow 

* Herdman, W. A., D.Sc, Professor of Natural History in University College, Liverpool 
Hewitt, William Morse Graily, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Obstetric Medicine in University 

College, London, 36 Berkeley Square, London 
Higgins, Charles Hayes, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.S., Alfred House. Birkenhead 205 

Hills, John, Lieut. -Colonel, C.B., Bombay Engineers, United Service Club, London 
Hislop, John, Secretary to the Department of Education, Wellington, New Zealand 
Hodgkinson, W. R., Ph.D., F.I.C., F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry and Physics at the Royal 
Military Academy and Royal Artillery College, Woolwich, 75 Vanbrugh Park, Black- 
heath, London 
Home, David Milne, of Milne-Graden, LL.D., F.G.S., 10 York Place 

* Home, John, F.G.S., Geological Survey of Scotland, 41 Southside Road, Inverness 210 

* Hoyle, William Evans, M.A., M.R.C.S., 25 Brunswick Road, Withington, Manchester 
Hunt, Rev. H. G. Bonavia, Mus. D. Dublin, Mus. B. Oxon., F.L.S., La Belle Sauvage, London 

* Hunter, Lieut.-Col. Chas., Plas Coch, Llanfairpwll, Anglesea, and 17 St George's Sq., London 

* Hunter, James, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.A.S., 20 Craigmillar Park 

* Hunter, William, M.D. 215 
Hutchison, Robert (Carlowrie Castle), and University Club 

Inglis, Right Hon. John, LL.D., D.C.L., Lord Justice-General of Scotland, and Chancellor 
of the University of Edinburgh, 30 Abercromby Place 

* Inglis, J. W., Memb. Inst. C.E., 19 Montpelier, Edinburgh 

* Irvine, Alex. Forbes, of Drum, LL.D., Advocate, Sheriff of Argyll (Vice-President), 

25 Castle Terrace 

* Irvine, Robert, Royston, Granton, Edinburgh 220 

Jack, William, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics in the University of Glasgow 



1110 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 
Election, 

1889 
1882 

1860 
1880 
1865 
1869 

1867 
1874 

1888 

1877 

1866 
1886 
1877 
1880 
1886 



1883 
1878 

1880 

1875 
1886 
1878 
1885 

1870 

1881 
1872 
1872 
1882 
1883 
1863 
1858 
1874 
1889 

1870 



1882 



B.P. 



* James, Alexander, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 44 Melville Street 

* Jamieson, A., Memb. Inst. C.E., Professor of Engineering in The Glasgow and West of 

Scotland Technical College, Glasgow 
Jamieson, George Auldjo, Actuary, 24 St Andrew Square 

Japp, A. H., LL.D., The Limes, Elmstead, near Colchester 225 

Jenner, Charles, Easter Duddingston Lodge 
Johnston, John Wilson, M.D., Surgeon-Major, Dacre House, Shrewsbury Road, Oxton, 

Birkenhead 

* Johnston, T. B., F.R.G.S., Geographer to the Queen, 9 Claremont Crescent 
Jones, Francis, Lecturer on Chemistry, Monton Place, Manchester 

Jones, John Alfred, Memb. Inst. C.E., Vice-President, and Engineer, City of Madras, 
Peter's Road, Madras 230 

* Jolly, William, H.M. Inspector of Schools, F.G.S., Ardgowan, Pollokshields 

* Keiller, Alexander, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., LL.D., 21 Queen Street 

* Kidston, Robert, F.G.S., 24 Victoria Place, Stirling 

* King, Sir James, of Campsie, Bart., LL.D., 12 Claremont Terrace, Glasgow 

* King, W. F, Lonend, Russell Place, Trinity 235 
*Kingsburgh, The Right Hon. Lord, C.B., LL.D., F.R.S., M.S.T.E. and E., Lord Justice- 
Clerk, and Lord President of the Second Division of the Court of Session, 15 Aber- 
cromby Place 

* Kinnear, The Hon. Lord, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, 2 Moray Place 

* Kintore, The Right Hon. the Earl of, M.A. Cantab., Keith Hall, Inglismaldie Castle, 

Laurencekirk 

* Knott, C. G., D.Sc, Prof, of Natural Philosophy in the Imperial University of Tokio, Japan 

* L'Amy, John Ramsay, of Dunkenny, Forfarshire, 107 Cromwell Road, London 240 

* Laing, Rev. George, 1 7 Buckingham Terrace 

* Lang, P. R. Scott, M.A., B.Sc, Professor of Mathematics in the University of St Andrews 

* Laurie, A. P., B.A., B.Sc, Lecturer on Chemistry at the People's Palace Technical School, 

London 

* Laurie, Simon S., M.A., Professor of Education in the University of Edinburgh, Nairne 

Lodge, Duddingstone 

* Lawson, Robert, M.D., Deputy-Commissioner in Lunacy, 24 Mayfield Terrace 245 

* Lee, Alexander H, C.E., Blairhoyle, Stirling 

* Lee, The Hon. Lord, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, 12 Rothesay Place 

* Leslie, Alexander, Memb. Inst. C.E., 12 Greenhill Terrace 

* Leslie, George, M.B., CM., Old Manse, Falkirk 

Leslie, Hon. G. Waldegrave, Leslie House, Leslie 250 

Leslie, James, Memb. Inst. C.E., 2 Charlotte Square 

* Letts, E. A, Ph.D., F.I.C., F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry, Queen's College, Belfast 

* Lindsay, Rev. James, B.D., B.Sc, F.G.S., Minister of St Andrews Parish, Springhill 

Terrace, Kilmarnock 

* Lister, Sir Joseph, Bart., M.D., F.R.C.S.L., F.R.C.S.E., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Professor of 

Clinical Surgery, King's College, Surgeon Extraordinary tothe Queen, 12 Park Crescent, 
Portland Place, London 

* Livingston, Josiah, 4 Minto Street 255 






ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1111 



Date of 

Election. 

1861 



1884 
1888 
1849 
1886 

1855 

1888 
1887 
1888 
1885 
1883 
1867 
1886 
1847 
1888 
1878 

1885 
1877 
1878 
1886 
1880 

1879 
1869 

1882 

1873 

1840 
1843 

1853 

1869 
1864 
1869 

1888 

1870 



P. 



P. 



N. P. 



Lorimer, James, M.A., Advocate, Professor of Public Law in the University of Edinburgh, 
1 Bruntsfield Crescent 

* Low, George M., Actuary, 15 Chester Street 

* Lowe, D. F., MA., Headmaster of Heriot's Hospital School, Lauriston 
Lowe, W. H., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., Woodcote, Inner Park, Wimbledon 

Lyster, George Fosbery, Memb. Inst. C.E., Gisburn House, Liverpool 260 

Macadam, Stevenson, Ph.D., Lecturer on Chemistry, Surgeons' Hall, Edinburgh, 11 East 
Brighton Crescent, Portobello 

* Macadam, W. Ivison, Lecturer on Chemistry, 6 East Brighton Crescent, Portobello 
MAldowie, Alexander M., M.D., Brook Street, Stoke-on-Trent 

MArthur, John, Battersea, London 

* M'Bride, Charles, M.D., Wigtown 265 

* M'Bride, P., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 16 Chester Street 

* M'Candlish, John M., W.S., 27 Drumsheugh Gardens 

* Macdonald, William J., M.A., 6 Lockharton Terrace 
Macdonald, W. Macdonald, of St Martin's, Perth 

* M'Fadyean, John, M.B., B.Sc, Lecturer on Anatomy, 9 East Hermitage Place, Leith 270 
Macfarlane, Alex., M.A., D.Sc, LL.D., Professor of Physics in the University of the State 

of Texas, Austin, Texas 

* Macfarlane, J. M., D.Sc, 15 Scotland Street 

* Macfle, Robert A., Dreghorn Castle, Colinton 

* M'Gowan, George, F.I.C., Ph.D., University College of North Wales, Bangor 

* MacGregor, Rev. James, D.D., 11 Cumin Place, Grange 275 
MacGregor, J. Gordon, M.A., D.Sc, Professor of Physics in Dalhousie College, Halifax, 

Nova Scotia 

* M'Grigor, Alexander Bennett, LL.D., 19 Woodside Terrace, Glasgow 

* MTntosh, William Carmichael, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., F.L.S., Professor of Natural History 

in the University of St Andrews, 2 Abbotsford Crescent, St Andrews 

* Mackay, John Sturgeon, M.A., LL.D., Mathematical Master in the Edinburgh Academy, 

69 Northumberland Street 
*M'Kendrick, John G., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., LL.D., F.R.S., Professor of the Institutes of 

Medicine in the University of Glasgow 280 

Mackenzie, John, New Club, Princes Street 
Maclagan, Sir Douglas, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence in the 

University of Edinburgh (Vice-President), 28 Heriot Row 
Maclagan, General R., Royal Engineers, LL.D., 4 West Cromwell Road, S. Kensington, 

London, S.W. 

* Maclagan, R. Craig, M.D., 5 Coates Crescent 

M'Lagan, Peter, of Pumpherston, M.P., Clifton Hall, Ratho 285 

* M'Laren, The Hon. Lord, LL.D. Edin. and Glasg., F.R.A.S., one of the Senators of the 

College of Justice (Vice-President), 46 Moray Place 

* Maclean, Magnus, M.A., Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University 

of Glasgow, 21 Hayburn Crescent, Partick 

* Macleod, Sir George H.B., M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Regius Prof, of Surgery in the University of 

Glasgow, and Surgeon in Ordinary to the Queen in Scotland, 10 Woodside Crescent, 
Glasgow 



1112 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 
Election. 

1876 
1883 
1872 
1876 
1884 
1883 
1888 
1858 
1880 

1882 

1869 
1888 

1864 
1866 

1885 
1883 
1888 
1885 

1886 
1852 
1833 
1886 
1866 

1889 
1865 
1870 

1871 

1868 
1887 

1887 
1873 
1874 

1888 
1877 



1870 



P. 



P. 



P. 



K.P. 



* Macleod, Rev. Norman, D.D., 7 Royal Circus 

* Macleod, W. Bowman, L.D.S., 16 George Square 290 

* Macmillan, Rev. Hugh, D.D., LL.D., Seafield, Greenock 

* Macmillan, John, M.A., B.Sc, 6 St Vincent Street 

* Macpherson, Rev. J. Gordon, M.A., D.Sc, Ruthven Manse, Meigle 

* M'Roherts, George, F.C.S., Bath House, Ardrossan, Ayrshire 

Mactear, James, F.C.S., 2 Victoria Mansions, Hyde Park, London 295 

Malcolm, R. B., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 126 George Street 

Marsden, R. Sydney, M.B., CM., D.Sc, F.I.C., F.C.S., Pembroke House, King Street, 

Stockton-on-Tees 
Marshall, D. H, M.A., Professor of Physics in Queen's University and College, Kingston, 

Ontario, Canada 
Marshall, Henry, M.D., Clifton, Bristol 

* Marshall, Hugh, D.Sc, Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry in the University of Edin- 

burgh, 1 Lome Terrace 300 

Marwick, Sir James David, LL.D., Town-Clerk, Glasgow 

* Masson, David, LL.D., Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in the University of 

Edinburgh, 58 Great King Street 

* Masson, Orme, D.Sc, Professor of Chemistry in the University of Melbourne 

* Matthews, James Duncan, Springhill, Aberdeen 

* Methven, C. W., Memb. Inst. C.E., Engineer's Office, Harbour Works, Port Natal 305 
*Mill, Hugh Robt., D.Sc, F.C.S., Scot. Marine Station, Granton, Braid Road, Morningside, 

Edinburgh 

* Miller, Hugh, H.M. Geological Survey Office, George IV. Bridge 

Miller, Thomas, M.A., LL.D., Emeritus Rector of Perth Academy, Inchbank House, Perth 
Milne, Admiral Sir Alexander, Bart., G.C.B., Inveresk 

* Milne, William, M.A.,B.Sc, Mathematical and Science Teacher, High School, Glasgow 310 

* Mitchell, Sir Arthur, K.C.B., M.A., M.D., LL.D., Commissioner in Lunacy (Vice-Presi- 

dent), 34 Drummond Place 

* Mitchell, A. Crichton, B.Sc, 2 Baxter's Place 

Moir, John J. A., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 52 Castle Street 

* Moncreiff, The Right Hon. Lord, of Tullibole, LL.D. (Honorary Vice-President), 15 

Great Stuart Street 

* Moncrieff, Rev. Canon William Scott, of Fossaway, Christ's Church Vicarage, Bishop- Wear- 

mouth, Sunderland 315 

* Montgomery, Very Rev. Dean, M.A., D.D., 17 Atholl Crescent 

Moos, Nanabhay A. F., L.C.E., B.Sc, Assistant Professor of Engineering, College of Science, 

Bombay 
More, Alexander Goodman, M.R.I.A., F.L.S., 74 Leinster Road, Dublin 

* Muir, M. M. Pattison, Praelector on Chemistry, Caius College, Cambridge 

* Muir, Thomas, M.A., LL.D. (Vice-President), Mathematical Master, High School, Glasgow, 

Beechcroft, Bothwell, Glasgow 320 

* Muirhead, George, Mains of Haddo, Aberdeen 

Mukhopadhyay, Asutosh, M.A., F.R.A.S., Examiner in Mathematics in the University of 
Calcutta, Professor of Mathematics at the Indian Association for the Cultivation of 
Science, 77 Russa Road North, Bhowanipore, Calcutta 

* Munn, David, M.A., 2 Ramsay Gardens 




ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1113 



Date of 
Election. 

1889 
1857 
1877 

1888 
1887 
1884 

1888 

1877 
1887 
1866 
1883 
1884 

1880 
1878 

1888 
1888 
1886 

1884 

1877 
1886 
1889 
1881 

1889 
1863 
1887 
1886 
1869 
1888 
1889 
1883 
1859 

1877 
1886 
1874 
1852 
1888 

1880 
1875 



N. P. 



N.P. 



P. 



* Munro, Rev. Robert, MA., B.D., F.SA. Scot., Free Church Manse, Old Kilpatrick 
Murray, John Ivor, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., M.R.C.P.E., 24 Huntriss Row, Scarborough 325 

*. Murray, John, LL.D., Ph.D., Director of the Challenger Expedition Commission, 28 Douglas 
Crescent, and United Service Club. Office, 45 Frederick Street 

* Murray, R. Milne, M.A, M.B., F.R.C.P.E., 10 Hope Street 

Muter, John, M.A., F.C.S., Winchester House, 397 Kennington Road, London 
Mylne, R. W., C.E., F.R.S., 7 Whitehall Place, London 

Napier, A. D. Leith, M.D., CM., M.R.C.P.L., 67 Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Square, 
London 330 

* Napier, John C, Audley Mansions, Grosvenor Square, London 

* Nasmyth, T. Goodall, M.B., CM., D.Sc, Foulford, Cowdenbeath, Fife 

* Nelson, Thomas, St Leonard's, Dalkeith Road 

* Newcombe, Henry, F.R.C.S.E., 5 Dairy mple Crescent, Edinburgh 

* Nicholson, J. Shield, Professor of Political Economy in the University of Edinburgh, 

Eden Lodge, Eden Lane, Newbattle Terrace 335 

* Nicol, W. W. J., M.A., D.Sc, Lecturer on Chemistry, Mason College, Birmingham 
Norris, Richard, M.D. 

* Ogilvie, F. Grant, M.A, B.Sc, Principal of the Heriot-Watt College, 27 Blacket Place 

* Oliphant, James, M.A., 50 Palmerston Place 

Oliver, James, M.D., CM., M.R.C.P., Assistant Physician, Hospital for Women, 18 
Gordon Square, London 340 

* Omond, Robert Traill, Superintendent of Ben Nevis Observatory, Fort- William, Inverness 

Panton, George A., 73 Westfield Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham 

* Paton, D. Noel, M.D., B.Sc, F.R.C.P.E., 4 Walker Street 

* Patrick, David, M.A., 25 Gillespie Crescent 

* Peach, B. N, F.G.S., Acting Palaeontologist of the Geological Survey of Scotland, 13 

Dalrymple Crescent 345 

* Peck, William, F.R.A.S., Town's Astronomer, Murrayfield, Edinburgh 
Peddie, Alexander, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 15 Rutland Street 

* Peddie, Wm., D.Sc, Assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy, Edinburgh University 

* Peebles, D. Bruce, Tay House, Bonnington, Edinburgh 

Pender, Sir John, 18 Arlington Street, Piccadilly, London 350 

* Perkin, W. H, junior, Ph.D., Prof, of Chemistry in the Heriot-Watt College 

* Philip, R. W., M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 4 Melville Crescent 

Phillips, Charles D. F., M.D., 10 Henrietta Street, Cavendish Square, London, W. 
Playfair, The Right Hon. Sir Lyon, K.C.B., M.P., LL.D., F.R.S., 68 Onslow Gardens, 

London 
Pole, William, Memb. Inst. C.E., Mus. Doc, F.R.S., 31 Parliament St., Westminster 355 

* Pollock, Charles Frederick, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., 1 Buckingham Terr., Hillhead, Glasgow 
Powell, Baden Henry Baden-, Forest Department, India 

Powell, Eyre B., C.S.I., M.A., 28 Park Road, Haverstock Hill, Hampstead, London 
Prain, David, Surgeon, Indian Medical Service, and Curator of the Herbarium, Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Shibpur, Calcutta 

* Prentice, Charles, Actuary, C.A., Edinburgh, Athenaeum, Glasgow 360 
Prevost, E. W., Ph.D., The Poplars, Shuttington, Tamworth 



1114 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 
Election 

1849 
1882 
1885 
1880 

1884 

1882 
1885 
1869 
1883 
1889 
1875 
1872 

1883 
1880 
1872 

1859 
1886 

1877 

1881 
1881 
1880 

1880 
1869 



1863 
1864 
1849 
1846 
1887 
1885 
1880 

1888 
1875 

1889 
1864 

1872 



B. P. 



Primrose, Hon. B. F., C.B., 22 Moray Place 

* Pryde, David, M.A., LL.D., Head Master of the Ladies' College, 10 Fettes Row, Edinburgh 

* Pullar, J. F., Rosebank, Perth 

* Pullar, Robert, Tayside, Perth 365 

Ramsay, E. Peirson,M.R.I.A., F.L.S., C.M.Z.S..F.R.G.S., F.G.S., Fellow of the Imperial and 
Royal Zool. and Bot. Soc. of Vienna, Curator of Australian Museum, Sydney, N.S.W. 

* Rattray, James Clerk, M.D., 61 Grange Loan 

* Rattray, John, M.A., B.Sc, 31 Belsize Avenue, South Hampstead, London 
Raven, Rev. Thomas Milville, M.A., The Vicarage, Crakehall, Bedale 

* Readman, J. B., D.Sc, F.C.S., 9 Moray Place 370 
Redwood, Boverton, Glenwathen, Ballard's Lane, Finchley, Middlesex 

* Richardson, Ralph, W.S., 10 Magdala Place 

Ricarde-Seaver, Major F. Ignacio, Conservative Club, St James' Street, London, and 
2 Rue Laffitte, Boulevard des Italiens, Paris 

* Ritchie, R. Peel, M.D., Pres. R.C.P.E., 1 Melville Crescent 

Roberts, D. Lloyd, M.D., F.R.C.P.L., 23 St John Street, Manchester 375 

* Robertson, D. M. C. L. Argyll, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Surgeon Oculist to the Queen for Scot- 

land, and President of the Royal College of Surgeons, 18 Charlotte Square 
Robertson, George, Memb. Inst. C.E., Athenaeum Club, Pall Mall, London 

* Robertson, Right Hon. J. P. B., Q.C., LL.D., M.P., Lord Advocate of Scotland, 19 Drum- 

sheugh Gardens 

* Robinson, George Carr, F.I.C., Lecturer on Chemistry in the College of Chemistry, Royal 

Institution, Hull 

* Rogerson, John Johnston, B.A., LL.B., Merchiston Castle Academy 380 
Rosebery, The Right Hon. the Earl of, LL.D., Dalmeny Park, Edinburgh 

Rowland, L. L., M.A., M.D., President of the Oregon State Medical Society, and Professor 
of Physiology and Microscopy in Williamette University, Salem, Oregon 

* Russell, J. A., M.A., B.Sc, M.B., F.R.C.P.E., Woodville, Canaan Lane 

* Rutherford, Wm, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., F.R.S., Professor of the Institutes of Medicine in 

the University of Edinburgh, 14 Douglas Crescent 

Sanderson, James, Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals, F.R.C.S.E., 8 Manor Place 385 
Sandford, The Right Rev. Bishop D. F., LL.D., Boldon Rectory, Newcastle-on-Tyne 
Sang, Edward, C.E., LL.D., 31 Mayfield Road 
Schmitz, Leonard, LL.D., 53 Gloucester Road, Regent's Park, London 

* Schulze, Adolf P., 2 Doune Gardens, Kelvinside, Glasgow 

Scott, Alexander, M.A., D.Sc, 4 North Bailey, Durham 390 

Scott, J. H, M.B., CM., M.R.C.S., Professor of Anatomy in the University of Otago, New 
Zealand 

* Scott, John, C.B., Shipbuilder, Hawkhill, Greenock 

Scott, Michael, Memb. Inst. C.E., care of Alexander Grahame, Esq., 30 Great George Street, 
Westminster 

* Scougal, Andrew E., M.A., H.M. Inspector of Schools, 12 Blantyre Terrace 

Sellar, W. Y, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Humanity in the University of Edinburgh, 
15 Buckingham Terrace 395 

* Seton, George, M.A., Advocate, 42 Greenhill Gardens 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1115 



Date of 
Election. 

1887 



1872 
1870 
1871 

1888 
1859 
1876 
1868 
1882 
1885 
1883 
1871 

1886 

1871 

1880 
1846 

1880 



1889 

1882 
1874 
1850 
1885 
1886 
1884 
1877 
1888 
1868 
1888 
1868 
1878 
1866 

1873 
1848 
1877 

1889 
1823 



KB. 
P. 



* Sexton, A. H., F.C.S., Professor of Chemistry, College of Science and Arts, 38 Bath Street, 
Glasgow 

Sibbald, John, M.D., Commissioner in Lunacy, 3 St Margaret's Road, Whitehouse Loan 

* Sime, James, M.A., South Park, Fountainhall Road 
♦Simpson, A. R, M.D., F.RC.P.E, Professor of Midwifery in the University of Edinburgh, 

52 Queen Street 400 

* Sinclair, D. S., 328 Renfrew Street, Glasgow 
Skene, W. F., W.S., LL.D., D.C.L., Historiographer-Royal for Scotland, 27 Inverleith Row 

* Skinner, William, W.S., Town-Clerk of Edinburgh, 35 George Square 

* Smith, Adam Gillies, C.A. (Treasurer), 64 Princes Street 
Smith, C. Michie, B.Sc, Professor of Physical Science, Christian College. Madras, India 405 

* Smith, George, F.C.S., Polmont Station 
Smith, James Greig, M.A., M.B., 16 Victoria Square, Clifton 

* Smith, John, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., LL.D., President of the Medico-Chirurgical Society, 11 
Wemyss Place 

* Smith, Major-General Sir R. Murdoch, K.C.M.G., R.E., Director of Museum of Science and 
Art, Edinburgh 

* Smith, Rev. W. Robertson, M. A., LL.D., Professor of Arabic in the Univ. of Cambridge 410 
Smith, William Robert, M.D., D.Sc, Barrister-at-Law, Professor of Forensic Medicine in 

King's College, 74 Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury Square, London 
Smyth, Piazzi, LL.D., Ex-Astronomer-Royal for Scotland, and Emeritus Professor of 

Astronomy in the University of Edinburgh, Clova, Ripon 
Sollas, W. J., M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S., late Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge, and Pro- 
fessor of Geology and Mineralogy in the University of Dublin, Talbot House, Merrion 
Avenue, Blackrock, County Dublin 

* Somerville, William, Dr Oec, B.Sc, of Comiston, Lecturer on Forestry in the University 
of Edinburgh, 1 Braid Crescent 

* Sorley, James, F.F.A., C.A., 18 Magdala Crescent 415 
P. * Sprague, T. B., M.A., Actuary, 29 Buckingham Terrace 
P. Stark, James, M.D., F.RC.P.E., of Huntfield, Underwood, Bridge of Allan 

* Steggall, J. E. A., Prof, of Mathematics and Natural Phil, in University College, Dundee 

* Stevenson, C. A., B.Sc, Assoc. Memb. Inst. C.E., 45 Melville Street 

* Stevenson, David Alan, B.Sc, Memb. Inst. C.E., 45 Melville Street 420 

* Stevenson, James, F.R.G.S., 4 Woodside Crescent, Glasgow 

* Stevenson, Rev. John, LL.D., Minister of Glamis, Forfarshire 
Stevenson, John J., 4 Porchester Gardens, London 

* Stewart, Charles Hunter, M.B., B.Sc, 2 Bellevue Terrace 
Stewart, Major-General J. H. M. Shaw, R.E., F.R.G.S., 61 Lancaster Gate, London, W. 425 

* Stewart, James R., M.A., 10 Salisbury Road 
♦Stewart, T. Grainger, M.D., F.RC.P.E, Professor of the Practice of Physic in the 

University of Edinburgh, 19 Charlotte Square 

* Stewart, Walter, 22 Torphichen Street 
Stirling, Patrick J., LL.D., Kippendavie House, Dunblane 

* Stirling, William, D.Sc, M.D., Brackenbury Professor of Physiology and Histology in 
Owens College and Victoria University, Manchester 430 

* Stockman, Ralph, M.D., F.RC.P.E, 5 Bellevue Crescent 
Stuart, Captain T. D., H.M.LS. 

VOL XXXV. PART IV. 8 F 



1116 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Date of 
Election 

1870 
1848 

1844 
1875 
1885 

1872 

1861 

1870 
1872 
1885 
1884 

1870 
1887 

1875 

1887 
1880 
1863 

1870 
1847 



1882 

1870 
1876 

1878 
1874 

1874 

1888 
1879 
1861 



1877 
1889 

1875 



K.P. 



P. 
P. 



V.J. 
K.P. 



N.P. 



N.P. 



* Swan, Patrick Don, Ex-Provost of Kirkcaldy 

Swan, Wm., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of St 

Andrews, Ardchapel, Helensburgh 
Swinton, A. Campbell, of Kimmerghame, LL.D., Duns 435 

* Syme, James, 9 Drumsheugh Gardens 

* Symington, Johnson, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., 2 Greenhill Park 

Tait, the Very Rev. A., D.D., LL.D., Provost of Tuam, Moylough Rectory, County Galway, 

Ireland 
Tait, P. Guthrie, M.A., Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh 

(General Secretary), 38 George Square 

* Tatlock, Robert R, City Analyst's Office, 156 Bath Street, Glasgow 440 

* Teape, Rev. Charles R, M.A, Ph.D., 15 Findhorn Place 

* Thompson, D Arcy W. , Professor of Natural History in University College, Dundee 

* Thorns, George Hunter, of Aberlemno, Advocate, Sheriff of the Counties of Orkney and 

Zetland, 13 Charlotte Square 

* Thomson, Rev. Andrew, D.D., 63 Northumberland Street 

* Thomson, Andrew, M.A., D.Sc, Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry in the University 

College, Dundee, 10 Comly Bank, Bridge End, Perth 445 

* Thomson, James, LL.D., F.R.S., 2 Florentine Gardens, Hillhead, Glasgow 

* Thomson, J. Arthur, M.A., Lect. on Zoology, School of Medicine, Edin., 30 Royal Circus 
Thomson, John Millar, King's College, London 

Thomson, Murray, M.D., Professor of Chemistry, Thomason College, Roorkee, India, 22 
Victoria Road, Gipsy Hill, London, S.E. 

* Thomson, Spencer C, Actuary, 10 Eglinton Crescent 450 
Thomson, Sir William, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S. (President), Foreign Associate of the 

Institute of France, Regius Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of 
Glasgow, Grand Officer of the Legion of Honour of France, and Member of the Prussian 
Order Pour le Merite 
Thomson, Wm., M.A., B.Sc, Professor of Mathematics, Victoria College, Stellenbosch, Cape 
Colony 

* Thomson, Wm. Burns, F.R.C.P.E., F.R.C.S.E., 112 Newington Green Road, London 
Thomson, William, Royal Institution, Manchester 

Thorburn, Robert Macfie, Uddevalla, Sweden 455 

* Traquair, R H, M.D., F.R.S., F.G.S., Pres. Royal Physical Soc, Keeper of the Natural His- 

tory Collections in the Museum of Science and Art, Edinburgh, 8 Dean Park Crescent 

* Tuke, J. Batty, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 20 Charlotte Square 

* Turnbull, Andrew H, Actuary, The Elms, Whitehouse Loan 

* Turnbull, John, of Abbey St Bathans, W.S., 49 George Square 

Turner, Sir William, M.B., LL.D., F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S., Professor of Anatomy in the 
University of Edinburgh, and President of the Royal Physical Society (Secretary), 
6 Eton Terrace 460 

* Underhill, Charles E., B.A., M.B., F.R.C.P.E., F.R.C.S.E., 8 Coates Crescent 
Underbill, T. Edgar, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Broomsgrove, Worcestershire 

Vincent, Charles Wilson, F.I.C., F.C.S., M.R.I., Librarian of the Reform Club, Pall Mall, 
and Royal Institution, Albemarle Street, London 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ORDINARY FELLOWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1117 



Date of 
Election 

1888 
1873 
1886 
1883 
1870 
1866 
1866 
1862 
1887 
1873 
1882 
1887 
1881 
1883 

1887 
1879 
1868 

1888 
1879 

1878 
1875 

1882 
1834 
1889 

1870 
1881 
1886 
1884 
1864 

1887 
1882 
1882 

1882 



Walker, James, Memb. Inst. C.E., Engineer's Office, Harbour Works, Douglas, Isle of Man 

* Walker, Robert, M.A., University, Aberdeen 465 

* Wallace, Robert, Prof, of Agriculture and Rural Economy in tbe University of Edinburgh 

* Watson, Charles, Redhall, Slateford 

* Watson, James, C.A., 45 Charlotte Square 

* Watson, John K., 14 Blackford Road 

* Watson, Patrick Heron, M.D., F.R.C.S.E., LL.D., 16 Charlotte Square 470 
Watson, Rev. Robert Boog, B.A., Free Church Manse, Cardross, Dumbartonshire 

* Webster, H. A., Librarian to University of Edinburgh, 7 Duddingstone Park, Portobello 
Welsh, David, Major-General, R.A., 1 Barton Terrace, Dawlish 

* Wenley, James A., Treasurer of the Bank of Scotland, 5 Drumsheugh Gardens 

* White, Arthur Silva, Secretary to the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, 22 Duke St. 475 
Whitehead, Walter, F.R.C.S.E., 202 Oxford Road, Manchester 

Wickham, R. H. B., M.D., F.R.C.S.E., Medical Superintendent, City and County Lunatic 
Asylum, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Dawlish, South Devon 

* Wieland, G. B., Whitehill, Rose well, Mid-Lothian 

* Will, John Charles Ogilvie, M.D., 305 Union Street, Aberdeen 

* Williams, W., Principal and Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, New Veterinary 

College, Leith Walk 480 

* Williamson, George, F.A.S. Scot., 37 Newton Street, Finnart, Greenock 

* Wilson, Andrew, PhD., Lecturer on Zoology and Comparative Anatomy in the Edinburgh 

Medical School, 118 Gilmore Place 

* Wilson, Rev. John, M.A., 27 Buccleuch Place 

Wilson, Sir Daniel, LL.D., President of the University of Toronto, and Professor of English 

Literature in that University 
Wilson, George, M.A, M.D., 23 Claremont Road, Leamington 485 

Wilson, Isaac, M.D. 
Wilson, Robert, Memb. Inst. C.E., St Stephen's Club, and 7 Westminster Chambers, 

Victoria Street, London 
Winzer, John, Chief Surveyor, Civil Service, Ceylon, 7 Dryden Place, Newington 

* Wise, Thos. Alex., M.D., F.R.C.P.E., F.R. AS., Thornton, the Beulah, Upper Norwood 

* Woodhead, German Sims, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., 6 Marchhall Crescent 490 
Woods, G. A, M.R.C.S., Lansdowne, 36 Hoghton Street, Southport 

Wyld, Robert S., LL.D., 19 Inverleith Row 

* Yeo, John S., Carrington House, Fettes College 

* Young, Andrew, F.G.S., 22 Elm Row 

* Young, Frank W., F.C.S., Lecturer on Natural Science, High School. Dundee, Woodmuir 

Park, West Newport, Fife 495 

* Young, Thomas Graham, Westfield, West Calder 



1118 



LIST OF HONORARY FELLOWS. 



LIST OF HONORARY FELLOWS 



AT NOVEMBER 1889. 



His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales. 



FOREIGNERS (LIMIT] 


ID TO THIRTY-SIX BY LAW X.). 


Elected 




1884 Pierre J. van Beneden, 


Louvain. 


1889 Marcellin Pierre Eugene Rerthelot, 


Paris. 


1864 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, 


Heidelberg. 


1877 Alphonse de Candolle, 


Geneva. 


1883 Luigi Cremona, 


Rome. 


1889 Ernst Curtiua, 


Berlin. 


1858 James D. Dana, 


New Haven, Conn. 


1877 Carl Gegenbaur, 


Heidelberg. 


1888 Ernst Haeckel, 


Jena. 


1883 Julius Hann, 


Vienna. 


1884 Charles Hermite, 


Paris. 


1864 Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, Berlin. 


1879 Jules Janssen, 


Paris. 


1875 August Kekule, 


Bonn. 


1864 Albert Kblliker, 


Wiirzburg. 


1875 Ernst Eduard Kummer, 


Berlin. 


1876 Ferdinand de Lesseps, 


Pans. 


1864 Rudolph Leuckart, 


Leipzig. 


1881 Sven Love^i, 


Stockholm. 


1889 James Russell Lowell, 


Cambridge, U.S. 


1888 Demetrius Ivanovich MendeMef, 


St Petersburg. 


1886 Alphonse Milne-Edwards, 


Paris. 


1864 Theodore Mommsen, 


Berlin. 


1881 Simon Newcomb, 


Washington. 


1886 H. A. Newton, 


Yale College. 


1874 Louis Pasteur, 


Paris. 


1886 Alphonse Renard, 


Gand. 


1889 Georg Hermann Quincke, 


Heidelberg. 


1881 Johannes Iapetus Smith Steenstrup, 


Copenhagen- 


1878 Otto Wilhelm Struve, 


Pulkowa. 


1886 Tobias Robert Thalen, 


Upsala. 


1874 OttoTorell, 


Lund. 


1868 Rudolph Virchow, 


Berlin. 


1874 Wilhelm Eduard Weber, 


Gottingen. 



Total 34. 



LIST OF HONORARY FELLOWS. 



1119 



BRITISH SUBJECTS (LIMITED TO TWENTY BY LAW X.). 
Elected. 

1849 John Couch Adams, LL.D., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. Inst, of France, Cambridge. 

1835 Sir George Biddell Airy, K.C.B., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Foreign 

Associate Inst, of France, Greenwich. 

1889 Ball, Sir Rohert Stawell, Kt., LL.D., M.R.I.A., Professor of 

Astronomy in the University of Dublin, and Royal Astronomer 

for Ireland, Dublin. 

1865 Arthur Cayley, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Corresp. Memb. Inst, of 

France, Cambridge. 

1884 Edward Frankland, D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. Inst, of 

France, London. 

1874 John Anthony Froude, LL.D., London. 

1881 The Hon. Justice Sir William Robert Grove, LL.D., D.C.L., 

F.R.S., London. 

1883 Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker, K.C.S.I., M.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., 

Corresp. Mem. Inst, of France, London. 

1884 William Huggins, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. Inst, of 

France, London. 

1876 Thomas Henry Huxley, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. 

Inst, of France, London. 

1845 Sir Richard Owen, K.C.B., M.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Foreign 

Associate Inst, of France, London. 

1886 The Lord Rayleigh, D.C.L., LL.D., Sec. R.S., Corresp. Mem. 

Inst, of France, London. 

1881 The Rev. George Salmon, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S., Corresp. 

Mem. Inst, of France, Dublin. 

1884 J. S. Burdon Sanderson, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., Oxford. 

1864 Sir George Gabriel Stokes, Bart., M.P., LL.D., D.C.L., Pres. R.S., 

Corresp. Mem. Inst, of France, Cambridge. 

1874 James Joseph Sylvester, LL.D., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. Inst. 

of France, Oxford. 

1864 The Right Hon. Lord Tennyson, D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S., Poet 

Laureate, Isle of Wight. 

1883 Alexander William Williamson, LL.D., F.R.S., Corresp. Mem. Inst. 

of France, London. 

1883 Colonel Henry Yule, C.B., LL.D., London. 

Total, 19. 



1120 LIST OP MEMBERS ELECTED. 

ORDINARY FELLOWS ELECTED 

During Session 1887-88, 

Arranged according to the Date of their Election. 



5th December 1887. 

D. S. Sinclair. A. D. Leith Napier, M.D., CM. 

Alexander Galt, B.Sc, F.C.S. 

lQth January 1888. 
John Norman Collie, Ph.D., F.C.S. Principal Grant Ogilvie, M.A., B.Sc. 

R. E. Allardice, M.A. D. F. Lowe, M.A. 

Charles Hunter Stewart, M.B., B.Sc. 

Uh February 1888. 

James MacTear, F.C.S. W. H. Perkin, Ph.D. 

John M'Arthur. H. N. Dickson. 

Charles A. Fawsitt. David Prain. 

George Brook, F.L.S. George Muirhead. 

Cathcart W. Methven, M. Inst. CE. 

5th March 1888. 
James Durham, F.G.S. Professor Thomas Hudson Beare, B.Sc, Assoc. 

William James Bell, B.A., LL.M., F.C.S. M. Inst. CE. 

Rev. John Stevenson. Andrew H. Turnbull, Actuary. 

Henry Brougham Guppy, M.B. John Alfred Jones, M. Inst. CE. 

Professor John Ferguson, M.A., LL.D. 

2nd April 1888. 
Rev. Thomas Burns, F.S.A Scot. R. Milne Murray, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.P.E. 

William A. Bryson. John M'Fadyean, M.B., B.Sc. 

1th May 1888. 
John Scott, C.B. Magnus Maclean, M.A. 

Hugh Marshall, B.Sc. D. Berry Hart, M.D., F.R.C.P.E. 

James Walker, M. Inst. CE. 

±th June 1888. 
George Williamson, F.A.S. Scot. C M. Airman, M.A., B.Sc, F.I.C., F.C.S. 

2nd July 1888. 
W. Ivi80N Macadam. James Oliphant, M.A. 



LIST OF MEMBERS DECEASED, ETC. 1121 



FELLOWS DECEASED OR RESIGNED 
During Session 1887-88. 

ORDINARY FELLOWS DECEASED. 

Colonel Balfour of Balfour and Trenabie. R. M. Smith. 
Robert Chambers. William Wallace, Ph.D. 

Professor Alexander Dickson. Allan A. M. Welwood, LL.D. 

Samuel Drew, M.D. Charles Edward Wilson, LL.D 

Professor John Wilson. 

RESIGNED. 

John W. Capstick. Robert Tennent. 

Thomas Harvey, LL.D. Peter Waddell. 



HONORARY FELLOWS DECEASED. 

Session 1887-88. 

FOREIGN. 

Rudolf Clausius. Asa Gray. J. N. Madvig. 

BRITISH. 

Professor Balfour Stewart. 



1122 



LIST OF MEMBERS ELECTED. 



OKDINARY FELLOWS ELECTED 

During Session 1888-89, 

Arranged according to the Date of their Election. 



William Somerville, B.Sc. 
Alexander James, M.D. 
Ralph Stockman, M.D. 



3rd December 1888. 

David Patrick, M.A. 

A. H. F. Barbour, M.D. 

A. Crichton Mitchell, B.Sc. 



1th January 1889. 
James Dalrymple Duncan, F.S.A. Scot. 



Boverton Redwood. 



\th March 1889. 

Rev. James Lindsay, M.A., B.D., B.Sc, F.G.S. 



1st April 1889. 

John Alison, MA. R. W. Philip, M.D., M.A., F.RC.P.E. 

T. Edgar Underhill, M.D., F.K.C.S.E. 

Qth May 1889. 
William Morse Graily Hewitt, M.D., F.R.C.P. 



George H. Geddes, C.E. 
William Peck, F.R.A.S. 



3rd June 1889. 

Robert Wilson, Memb. Inst. C.E. 

Rev. Robert Munro, M.A., B.D., F.S.A. Scot. 



1st July 1889. 
Professor T. D. Collis Barry, F.Z.S., F.C.S. Andrew E. Scougal, M.A. 



LIST OF MEMBERS DECEASED, ETC. 1123 



FELLOWS DECEASED OR RESIGNED 
During Session 1888-89. 

ORDINARY EELLOWS DECEASED. 

John Frederic Latrobe Bateman, William Dickson. 

Memb. Inst. C.E., F.R.S. Sir James Falshaw, Bart., Assoc. Inst. 
Joseph James Coleman. C.E. 

Charles Cowan of Westerlea. T. H. Cockburn Hood, F.G.S. 

James Dalmahoy. William Miller, S.S.C. 

Henry Davidson of Muirhonse. Prof. Sir James Boberton, LL.D. 

Edmund Ronalds, LL.D. 

RESIGNED. 
Bev. F. E. Belcombe. Alan MacDodgall, Memb. Inst. C.E. 



HONORARY FELLOWS DECEASED. 

Session 1888-89. 

FOREIGN. 

Michel Eugene Chevreul. Franz Cornelius Donders. 

BRITISH. 
James Prescott Joule. 



VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 8 G 



LAWS 



OF THE 



ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH. 



AS REVISED 20th FEBRUARY 1882. 



( 1127 ) 



LAWS. 



[By the Charter of the Society (printed in the Transactions, Vol. VI. p. 5), the Laws cannot 
be altered, except at a Meeting held one month after that at which the Motion for 
alteration shall have been proposed.] 

I. 
THE EOYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH shall consist of Ordinary and Title. 
Honorary Fellows. 

II. 

Every Ordinary Fellow, within three months after his election, shall pay Two The fees of 0rdin - 

J J \ . . . ary Fellows residing 

Guineas as the fee of admission, and Three Guineas as his contribution for the in Scotland. 
Session in which he has been elected ; and annually at the commencement of every 
Session, Three Guineas into the hands of the Treasurer. This annual contribution 
shall continue for ten years after his admission, and it shall be limited to Two 
Guineas for fifteen years thereafter.* 

III. 

All Fellows who shall have paid Twenty-five years' annual contribution shall Payment to cease 

after 25 years. 

be exempted from further payment. 

IV. 

The fees of admission of an Ordinary Non-Resident Fellow shall be £26, 5s., Fees of Non-Resi- 

« l- o -kx t-» dent Ordinary 

payable on his admission ; and m case of any Non-Resident Fellow coming to Fellows. 
reside at any time in Scotland, he shall, during each year of his residence, pay 
the usual annual contribution of £3, 3s., payable by each Resident Fellow ; but 
after payment of such annual contribution for eight years, he shall be exempt 

* A modification of this rule, in certain cases, was agreed to at a Meeting of the Society held on 
the 3rd January 1831. 

At the Meeting of the Society, on the 5th January 1857, when the reduction of the Contribu- 
tions from £3, 3s. to £2, 2s., from the 11th to the 25th year of membership, was adopted, it was 
resolved that the existing Members shall share in this reduction, so far as regards their future annual 
Contributions. 



1128 



LAWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Case of Fellows 
becoming Non- 
Kcsident. 



from any further payment. In the case of any Resident Fellow ceasing to reside 
in Scotland, and wishing to continue a Fellow of the Society, it shall be in the 
power of the Council to determine on what terms, in the circumstances of each 
case, the privilege of remaining a Fellow of the Society shall be continued to 
such Fellow while out of Scotland. 



Defaulters. 



Privileges of 
Ordinary Fellows. 



V. 

Members failing to pay their contributions for three successive years (due 
application having been made to them by the Treasurer) shall be reported to 
the Council, and, if they see fit, shall be declared from that period to be no 
longer Fellows, and the legal means for recovering such arrears shall be 
employed. 

VI. 

None but Ordinary Fellows shall bear any office in the Society, or vote in 
the choice of Fellows or Office-Bearers, or interfere in the patrimonial interests 
of the Society. 



Numbers Un- 
limited. 



VII. 

The number of Ordinary Fellows shall be unlimited. 



Fellows entitled to 
Transactions. 



VIII. 

The Ordinary Fellows, upon producing an order from the Treasurer, shall 
be entitled to receive from the Publisher, gratis, the Parts of the Society's 
Transactions which shall be published subsequent to their admission. 



Mode of Recom- 
mending Ordinary 
Fellows. 



IX. 

Candidates for admission as Ordinary Fellows shall make an application in 
writing, and shall produce along with it a certificate of recommendation to the 
purport below,* signed by at least four Ordinary Fellows, two of whom shall 
certify their recommendation from personal knowledge. This recommendation 
shall be delivered to the Secretary, and by him laid before the Council, and 
shall afterwards be printed in the circulars for three Ordinary Meetings of 
the Society, previous to the day of election, and shall lie upon the table during 
that time. 



* " A. B., a gentleman well versed in Science (or Polite Literature, as the case may be), being 
" to our knowledge desirous of becoming a Fellow of the Koyal Society of Edinburgh, we hereby 
" recommend him as deserving of that honour, and as likely to prove a useful and valuable Member." 



LAWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1129 



X. 



Honorary Fellows shall not be subject to any contribution. This class shall Honorary Fellows, 
consist of persons eminently distinguished for science or literature. Its number Foreign. 
shall not exceed Fifty-six, of whom Twenty may be British subjects, and Thirty- 
six may be subjects of foreign states. 

XI. 

Personages of Royal Blood may be elected Honorary Fellows, without regard Royal Personages. 
to the limitation of numbers specified in Law X. 

XII. 

Honorary Fellows may be proposed by the Council, or by a recommenda- Recommendation 
tion (in the form given below*) subscribed by three Ordinary Fellows ; and in Fellows. 
case the Council shall decline to bring this recommendation before the Society, 
it shall be competent for the proposers to bring the same before a General 
Meeting. The election shall be by ballot, after the proposal has been commu- Mode of Election. 
nicated viva voce from the Chair at one meeting, and printed in the circulars 
for two ordinary meetings of the Society, previous to the day of election. 

XIII. 

The election of Ordinary Fellows shall only take place at the first Ordinary Election of ordi- 
Meeting of each month during the Session. The election shall be by ballot, 
and shall be determined by a majority of at least two-thirds of the votes, pro- 
vided Twenty-four Fellows be present and vote. 

XIV. 

The Ordinary Meetings shall be held on the first and third Mondays of Ordinary Meet- 
every month from December to July inclusively ; excepting when there are 
five Mondays in January, in which case the Meetings for that month shall 
be held on its third and fifth Mondays. Regular Minutes shall be kept of 
the proceedings, and the Secretaries shall do the duty alternately, or 
according to such agreement as they may find it convenient to make. 

* We hereby recommend 

for the distinction of being made an Honorary Fellow of this Society, declaring that each of us from 
our own knowledge of his services to (Literature or Science, as the case may be) believe him to be 
worthy of that honour. 

(To be signed by three Ordinary Fellows.) 



To the President and Council of the Royal Society 
of Edinburgh. 



1130 



LAWS OF THE SOCIETY. 



XV. 

Tha Transactions. The Society shall from time to time publish its Transactions and Proceed- 

ings. For this purpose the Council shall select and arrange the papers which 
they shall deem it expedient to publish in the Transactions of the Society, and 
shall superintend the printing of the same. 

The Council shall have power to regulate the private business of the Society. 
At any Meeting of the Council the Chairman shall have a casting as well as a 
deliberative vote. 

XVI. 

How Published. The Transactions shall be published in parts or Fasciculi at the close of 

each Session, and the expense shall be defrayed by the Society. 



The Council. 



Retiring Council- 
lors. 



XVII. 

That there shall be formed a Council, consisting — First, of such gentlemen 
as may have filled the office of President ; and Secondly, of the following to be 
annually elected, viz. : — a President, Six Vice-Presidents (two at least of whom 
shall be resident), Twelve Ordinary Fellows as Councillors, a General Secretary, 
Two Secretaries to the Ordinary Meetings, a Treasurer, and a Curator of the 
Museum and Library. 

XVIII. 

Four Councillors shall go out annually, to be taken according to the order 
in which they stand on the list of the Council. 



Election of Office- 

Bearers. 



XIX. 

An Extraordinary Meeting for the Election of Office-Bearers shall be held 
on the fourth Monday of November annually. 



XX. 

special Meetings : Special Meetings of the Society may be called by the Secretary, by direction 

how called. . , . . 

of the Council ; or on a requisition signed by six or more Ordinary Fellows. 
Notice of not less than two days must be given of such Meetings. 



Treasurer's Duties. 



XXI. 

The Treasurer shall receive and disburse the money belonging to the Society, 
granting the necessary receipts, and collecting the money when due. 

He shall keep regular accounts of all the cash received and expended, which 
shall be made up and balanced annually ; and at the Extraordinary Meeting in 
November, he shall present the accounts for the preceding year, duly audited. 



LAWS OF THE SOCIETY. 1131 

At this Meeting, the Treasurer shall also lay before the Council a list of all 
arrears due above two years, and the Council shall thereupon give such direc- 
tions as they may deem necessary for recovery thereof. 

XXII. 

At the Extraordinary Meeting in November, a professional accountant shall Auditor. 
be chosen to audit the Treasurer's accounts for that year, and to give the neces- 
sary discharge of his intromissions. 

XXIII. 

The General Secretary shall keep Minutes of the Extraordinary Meetings of General secretary's 

Duties 

the Society, and of the Meetings of the Council, in two distinct books. He 
shall, under the direction of the Council, conduct the correspondence of the 
Society, and superintend its publications. For these purposes he shall, when 
necessary, employ a clerk, to be paid by the Society. 

XXIV. 

The Secretaries to the Ordinary Meetings shall keep a regular Minute-book, Secretaries to 
in which a full account of the proceedings of these Meetings shall be entered ; 
they shall specify all the Donations received, and furnish a list of them, and of 
the Donors' names, to the Curator of the Library and Museum ; they shall like- 
wise furnish the Treasurer with notes of all admissions of Ordinary Fellows. 
They shall assist the General Secretary in superintending the publications, and 
in his absence shall take his duty. 

XXV. 

The Curator of the Museum and Library shall have the custody and charge Curator of Museum 
of all the Books, Manuscripts, objects of Natural History, Scientific Produc- 
tions, and other articles of a similar description belonging to the Society ; he 
shall take an account of these when received, and keep a regular catalogue of 
the whole, which shall lie in the Hall, for the inspection of the Fellows. 

XXVI. 

All Articles of the above description shall be open to the inspection of the Use of Museum 
Fellows at the Hall of the Society, at such times and under such regulations, 
as the Council from time to time shall appoint. 

XXVII. 

A Register shall be kept, in which the names of the Fellows shall be Kegister Book. 
enrolled at their admission, with the date. 

VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 8 H 



( 1132 ) 



THE KEITH, MAKDOUGALL-BRISBANE, NEILL, AND 
VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES. 



The above Prizes will be awarded by the Council in the following manner : — 



I. KEITH PRIZE. 

The Keith Prize, consisting of a Gold Medal and from £40 to £50 in 
Money, will be awarded in the Session 1889-90 for the " best communication 
on a scientific subject, communicated, in the first instance, to the Royal Society 
during the Sessions 1887-88 and 1888-89." Preference will be given to a 
paper containing a discovery. 

II. MAKDOUGALL-BRISBANE PRIZE. 

This Prize is to be awarded biennially by the Council of the Royal Society 
of Edinburgh to such person, for such purposes, for such objects, and in such 
manner as shall appear to them the most conducive to the promotion of the 
interests of science ; with the proviso that the Council shall not be compelled 
to award the Prize unless there shall be some individual engaged in scientific 
pursuit, or some paper written on a scientific subject, or some discovery in 
science made during the biennial period, of sufficient merit or importance in 
the opinion of the Council to be entitled to the Prize. 

1. The Prize, consisting of a Gold Medal and a sum of Money, will be 
awarded at the commencement of the Session 1890-91, for an Essay or Paper 
having reference to any branch of scientific inquiry, whether Material or 
Mental. 

2. Competing Essays to be addressed to the Secretary of the Society, and 
transmitted not later than 1st June 1890. 

3. The Competition is open to all men of science. 



APPENDIX — KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA PRIZES. 1133 

4. The Essays may be either anonymous or otherwise. In the former case, 
they must be distinguished by mottoes, with corresponding sealed billets, super- 
scribed with the same motto, and containing the name of the Author. 

5. The Council impose no restriction as to the length of the Essays, which 
may be, at the discretion of the Council, read at the Ordinary Meetings of the 
Society. They wish also to leave the property and free disposal of the manu- 
scripts to the Authors ; a copy, however, being deposited in the Archives of 
the Society, unless the paper shall be published in the Transactions. 

6. In awarding the Prize, the Council will also take into consideration 
any scientific papers presented to the Society during the Sessions 1888-89, 
1889-90, whether they may have been given in with a view to the prize or not. 



III. NEILL PRIZE. 

The Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh having received the bequest 
of the late Dr Patrick Neill of the sum of £500, for the purpose of " the 
interest thereof being applied in furnishing a Medal or other reward every 
second or third year to any distinguished Scottish Naturalist, according as such 
Medal or reward shall be voted by the Council of the said Society," hereby 
intimate, 

1. The Neill Prize, consisting of a Gold Medal and a sum of Money, will 
be awarded during the Session 1889-90. 

2. The Prize will be given for a Paper of distinguished merit, on a subject 
of Natural History, by a Scottish Naturalist, which shall have been presented 
to the Society during the three years preceding the 1st May 1889, — or failing 
presentation of a paper sufficiently meritorious, it will be awarded for a work 
or publication by some distinguished Scottish Naturalist, on some branch of 
Natural History, bearing date within five years of the time of award. 



IV. VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZE. 

This Prize, founded in the year 1887 by Dr R. H. Gunning, is to be awarded 
triennially by the Council of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, in recognition of 
original work in Physics, Chemistry, or Pure or Applied Mathematics. 



1134 APPENDIX — KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA PRIZES. 

Evidence of such work may be afforded either by a Paper presented to the 
Society, or by a Paper on one of the above subjects, or some discovery in them 
elsewhere communicated or made, which the Council may consider to be 
deserving of the Prize. 

The Prize is open to men of science resident in or connected with Scotland. 

The first award shall be in the year 1887, and shall consist of a sum of 
money. In accordance with the wish of the Donor, the Council of the Society 
may on fit occasions award the Prize for work of a definite kind to be under- 
taken during the three succeeding years by a scientific man of recognised 
ability. 



( 1135 ) 



AWARDS OF THE KEITH, MAKDOUGALL-BRISBANE, NEILL, AND 
VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES, FROM 1827 TO 1888. 



I. KEITH PRIZE. 



1st Biennial Period, 1827-29. — Dr Brewster, for his papers " on his Discovery of Two New Immis- 
cible Fluids in the Cavities of certain Minerals," published in 
the Transactions of the Society. 

2nd Biennial Period, 1829-31. — Dr Brewster, for his paper "on a New Analysis of Solar 

Light," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

3rd Biennial Period, 1831-33. — Thomas Graham, Esq., for his paper " on the Law of the Diffusion 

of Gases," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

4th Biennial Period, 1833-35. — Professor J. D. Forbes, for his paper " on the Refraction and Polari- 
zation of Heat," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

5th Biennial Period, 1835-37. — John Scott Russell, Esq., for his Researches "on Hydrodynamics," 

published in the Transactions of the Society. 

6th Biennial Period, 1837-39. — Mr John Shaw, for his experiments "on the Development and 

Growth of the Salmon," published in the Transactions of the 
Society. 

7th Biennial Period, 1839-41. — Not awarded. 

8th Biennial Period, 1841-43. — Professor James David Forbes, for his papers "on Glaciers," 

published in the Proceedings of the Society. 

9th Biennial Period, 1843-45. — Not awarded. 

10th Biennial Period, 1845-47. — General Sir Thomas Brisbane, Bart., for the Makerstoun Observa- 
tions on Magnetic Phenomena, made at his expense, and 
published in the Transactions of the Society. 

11th Biennial Period, 1847-49. — Not awarded. 

12th Biennial Period, 1849-51. — Professor Kelland, for his papers "on General Differentiation, 

including his more recent communication on a process of the 
Differential Calculus, and its application to the solution of 
certain Differential Equations," published in the Transactions 
of the Society. 

13th Biennial Period, 1851-53. — W. J. Macquorn Rankine, Esq., for his series of papers "on the 

Mechanical Action of Heat," published in the Transactions 
of the Society. 

14th Biennial Period, 1853-55. — Dr Thomas Anderson, for his papers "on the Crystalline Con- 
stituents of Opium, and on the Products of the Destructive 
Distillation of Animal Substances," published in the Trans- 
actions of the Society. 

15th Biennial Period, 1855-57. — Professor Boole, for his Memoir " on the Application of the Theory 

of Probabilities to Questions of the Combination of Testimonies 
and Judgments," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

16th Biennial Period, 1857-59. — Not awarded. 

17th Biennial Period, 1859-61. — John Allan Broun, Esq., F.R.S., Director of the Trevandrum 

Observatory, for his papers " on the Horizontal Force of the 
Earth's Magnetism, on the Correction of the Biiilar Magnet- 
ometer, and on Terrestrial Magnetism generally," published in 
the Transactions of the Society. 



1136 APPENDIX — KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES. 

18th Biennial Period, 1861-63. — Professor William Thomson, of the University of Glasgow, for his 

Communication " on some Kinematical and Dynamical 
Theorems." 

19th Biennial Period, 1863-65. — Principal Forbes, St Andrews, for his " Experimental Inquiry into 

the Laws of Conduction of Heat in Iron Bars," published in 
the Transactions of the Societj'. 

20th Biennial Period, 1865-67.— Professor C. Piazzi Smyth, for his paper "on Recent Measures at 

the Great Pyramid," published in the Transactions of the 
Society. 

2 1st Biennial Period, 1867—69. — Professor P. G. Tait, for his paper " on the Rotation of a Rigid 

Body about a Fixed Point," published in the Transactions of 
the Society. 

22nd Biennial Period, 1869-71. — Professor Clerk Maxwell, for his paper " on Figures, Frames, 

and Diagrams of Forces," published in the Transactions of the 
Society. 

23rd Biennial Period, 1871-73. — Professor P. G. Tait, for his paper entitled "First Approximation 

to a Thermo-electric Diagram," published in the Transactions 
of the Society. 

24th Biennial Period, 1873-75. — Professor Crum Brown, for his Researches "on the Sense of Rota- 
tion, and on the Anatomical Relations of the Semicircular 
Canals of the Internal Ear." 

25th Biennial Period, 1875-7 7. — Professor M. Forster Heddle, for his papers "on the Rhom- 

bohedral Carbonates," and " on the Felspars of Scotland," 
published in the Transactions of the Society. 

26th Biennial Period, 1877-79. — Professor H. C. Fleeming Jenkin, for his paper "on the Appli- 
cation of Graphic Methods to the Determination of the Effi- 
ciency of Machinery," published in the Transactions of the 
Society; Part II. having appeared in the volume for 1877-78. 

27th Biennial Period, 1879-81. — Professor George Chrystal, for his paper " on the Differential 

Telephone," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

28th Biennial Period, 1881-83. — Thomas Muir, Esq., LL.D., for his "Researches into the Theory 

of Determinants and Continued Fractions," published in the 
Proceedings of the Society. 

29th Biennial Period, 1883-85. — John Aitken, Esq., for his paper "on the Formation of Small 

Clear Spaces in Dusty Air," and for previous papers on 
Atmospheric Phenomena, published in the Transactions of 
the Society. 

30th Biennial Period, 1885-87. — John Young Buchanan, Esq., for a series of communications, 

extending over several years, on subjects connected with 
Ocean Circulation, Compressibility of Glass, &c. ; two of 
which, viz., " On Ice and Brines," and " On the Distribution 
of Temperature in the Antarctic Ocean," have been published 
in the Proceedings of the Society. 



II. MAKDOUGALL-BRISBANE PRIZE. 

1st Biennial Period, 1859. — Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, on account of his Contributions to 

the Geology of Scotland. 

2nd Biennial Period, 1860-62.— William Seller, M.D., F.R.C.P.E., for his " Memoir of the Life 

and Writings of Dr Robert Whytt," published in the Trans- 
actions of the Society. 



APPENDIX — KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES. 1137 

3rd Biennial Period, 1862-64. — John Denis Macdonald, Esq., R.N., F.R.S., Surgeon of H.M.S. 

" Icarus," for his paper " on the Representative Relationships 
of the Fixed and Free Tunicata, regarded as Two Sub-classes 
of equivalent value; with some General Remarks on their 
Morphology," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

4th Biennial Period, 1864-66. — Not awarded. 

5th Biennial Period, 1866-68. — Dr Alexander Crum Brown and Dr Thomas Richard Fraser, 

for their conjoint paper " on the Connection between 
Chemical Constitution and Physiological Action," published 
in the Transactions of the Society. 

6th Biennial Period, 1868-70. — Not awarded. 

7th Biennial Period, 1870-72. — George James Allman, M.D., F.R.S., Emeritus Professor of 

Natural History, for his paper " on the Homological Relations 
of the Coelenterata," published in the Transactions, which 
forms a leading chapter of his Monograph of Gymnoblastic 
or Tubularian Hydroids — since published. 

8th Biennial Period, 1872-74. — Professor Lister, for his paper "on the Germ Theory of Putre- 
faction and the Fermentive Changes," communicated to the 
Society, 7th April 1873. 

9th Biennial Period, 1874-76. — Alexander Buchan, A.M., for his paper "on the Diurnal 

Oscillation of the Barometer," published in the Transactions 
of the Society. 

10th Biennial Period, 1876-78. — Professor Archibald Geikie, for his paper "on the Old Red 

Sandstone of Western Europe," published in the Transactions 
of the Society. 

11th Biennial Period, 1378-80. — Professor Piazzi Smyth, Astronomer-Royal for Scotland, for his 

paper "on the Solar Spectrum in 1877-78, with some 
Practical Idea of its probable Temperature of Origination," 
published in the Transactions of the Society. 

12th Biennial Period, 1880-82. — Professor James Geikie, for his "Contributions to the Geology of 

the North- West of Europe," including his paper " on the 
Geology of the Faroes," published in the Transactions of the 
Society. 

13th Biennial Period, 1882-84. — Edward Sang, Esq., LL.D., for his paper "on the Need of 

Decimal Subdivisions in Astronomy and Navigation, and on 
Tables requisite therefor," and generally for his Recalculation 
of Logarithms both of Numbers and Trigonometrical Ratios, 
— the former communication being published in the Pro- 
ceedings of the Society. 

14th Biennial Period, 1884-86. — John Murray, Esq., LL.D., for his papers "On the Drainage 

Areas of Continents, and Ocean Deposits," " The Rainfall of 
the Globe, and Discharge of Rivers," " The Height of the Land 
and Depth of the Ocean," and " The Distribution of Tem- 
perature in the Scottish Lochs as affected by the Wind." 

15th Biennial Period, 1886-88. — Archibald Geikie, Esq., LL.D., for numerous communications, 

especially that entitled " History of Volcanic Action during 
the Tertiary Period in the British Isles," published in the 
Transactions of the Society. 



1138 APPENDIX— KEITH, BRISBANE, NEILL, AND VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZES. 



III. THE NEILL PRIZE. 

1st Triennial Period, 1856-59. — Dr W. Lauder Lindsay, for his paper " on the Spermogones and 

Pycnides of Filamentous, Fruticulose, and Foliaceous Lichens," 
published in the Transactions of the Society. 

2nd Triennial Period, 1859-62. — Robert Kaye Greville, LL.D., for his Contributions to Scottish 

Natural History, more especially in the department of Cryp- 
togamic Botany, including his recent papers on Diatomacese. 

3rd Triennial Period, 1862-65. — Andrew Crombie Ramsay, F.R.S., Professor of Geology in the 

Government School of Mines, and Local Director of the 
Geological Survey of Great Britain, for his various works and 
Memoirs published during the last five years, in which he 
has applied the large experience acquired by him in the 
Direction of the arduous work of the Geographical Survey of 
Great Britain to the elucidation of important questions bear- 
ing on Geological Science. 

4th Triennial Period, 1865-68. — Dr William Carmichael MTntosh, for his paper "on the Struc- 
ture of the British Nemerteans, and on some New British 
Annelids," published in the Transactions of the Society. 

5th Triennial Period, 1868-71. — Professor William Turner, for his papers "on the great Finner 

Whale ; and on the Gravid Uterus, and the Arrangement of 
the Foetal Membranes in the Cetacea,'"' published in the 
Transactions of the Society. 

6th Triennial Period, 1871-74. — Charles William Peach, for his Contributions to Scottish Zoology 

and Geology, and for his recent contributions to Fossil Botany. 

7th Triennial Period, 1874-77. — Dr Ramsay H. Traquair, for his paper " on the Structure and 

Affinities of Tristichopterus alatus (Egerton), published in 
the Transactions of the Society, and also for his contributions 
to the Knowledge of the Structure of Recent and Fossil Fishes. 

8th Triennial Period, 1877-80. — John Murray, for his paper "on the Structure and Origin of 

Coral Reefs and Islands," published (in abstract) in the 
Proceedings of the Society. 

9th Triennial Period, 1880-83. — Professor Herdman, for his papers "on the Tunicata," published 

in the Proceedings and Transactions of the Society. 

1 0th Triennial Period, 1883-86. — B. N. Peach, Esq., for his Contributions to the Geology and 

Palaeontology of Scotland, published in the Transactions of 
the Society. 



IV. VICTORIA JUBILEE PRIZE. 

1st Triennial Period, 1884-87. — Sir William Thomson, Pres. R.S.E., F.R.S., for a remarkable 

series of papers " on Hydrokinetics," especially on Waves 
and Vortices, which have been communicated to the Society. 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



STATUTOBY GENERAL MEETINGS, 

28th NOVEMBER 1887 



AND 

26th NOVEMBER 1888. 



VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 8 I 



( 1141 ) 



STATUTORY MEETING. 



HUNDKED AND FIFTH SESSION. 
Monday, 28th November 1887. 

At a General Statutory Meeting, 

Sir William Thomson in the Chair. 

The Minutes of last General Statutory Meeting of 22nd November 1886 were read 
approved, and signed. 

The Secretary read a letter of apology for absence from Professor M'Intosh. 

On the motion of Dr Buchan, the Lord Provost and Mr Andrew Young were named 
Scrutineers of the Balloting Lists. They reported that the following Council had been 
unanimously elected : — 

Sir William Thomson, LL.D., F.R.S., President. 

David Milne Home, LL.D., 

John Murray, Ph.D., 

Professor Sir Douglas Maolagan, 

rp, tj T , ,, > Vice-Presidents. 

The Hon. Lord Maclaren, 

The Rev. Professor Flint, D.D., 

Professor Chrystal, 

Professor Tait, M.A., General Secretary. 

Professor Sir Wm. Turner, F.R.S., ) 

Professor Crum Brown, F.R.S., } Secretaries to 0rdinar y Meetin S s - 

Adam Gillies Smith, Esq., C.A, Treasurer. 

Alexander Buchan, Esq., M.A., LL.D., Curator of Library and Museum. 

COUNCILLORS. 

Professor Butcher, M.A. Robert M. Ferguson, Esq., PhD. 

Professor M'Kendrick, F.R.S. A. Forbes Irvine, Esq. of Drum, LL.D. 

Thomas Muir, Esq., M.A., LL.D. Dr J. Batty Tuke, F.R.C.P.E. 

Professor M'Intosh, F.R.S. Professor Bower, M.A., F.L.S. 

Sir Arthur Mitchell, OB. Dr G. Sims Woodhead. 

Stair A. Agnew, Esq., C.B., M.A. Robert Cox, Esq. of Gorgie, M.A. 



1142 APPENDIX. — PROCEEDINGS OF STATUTORY MEETINGS. 

The Treasurer's Accounts for the past Session, with the Auditor's Report thereon, were 
read. On the motion of Sir Douglas Maclagan, seconded by Sheriff Forbes Irvine, these 
were unanimously approved. 

Sheriff Irvine, seconded by the Lord Provost, moved that the Auditor be reappointed. 
Agreed to. 

On the motion of the General Secretary, a vote of thanks was passed to the Chair- 
man for presiding. 

Douglas Maclagan, V.-P. 



( 1143 ) 



STATUTORY MEETING. 



HUNDRED AND SIXTH SESSION. 

Monday, 26th November 1888. 

At a General Statutory Meeting, 

Sir Douglas Maclagan in the Chair. 

The Minutes of last General Statutory Meeting of 28th November 1887 were read, 
approved, and signed. 

On the motion of Dr Buchan, Messrs Forbes Ievine and Young were invited to act as 
Scrutineers. 

A Ballot having been taken, the Scrutineers reported that the following new Council 
had been unanimously elected : — 

Sir William Thomson, LL.D, F.R.S, President. 

John Murray, Esq., LL.D., 

Professor Sir Douglas Maclagan, 

Hon. Lord M'Laren, LL.D., 

Rev. Professor Flint. D.D., 

Professor Chrystal, LL.D., 

Thomas Muir, Esq., LL.D., 

Professor Tait, M.A., General Secretary. 

Professor Sir Wm. Turner, F.R.S., ) 

Professor Crum Brown, E.R.S., \ Secretaries to Ordinary Meetings. 

Adam Gillies Smith, Esq., C.A., Treasurer. 

Alexander Buchan, Esq., M.A., LL.D, Curator of Library and Museum. 



> Vice-Presidents. 



1144 APPENDIX. — PROCEEDINGS OF STATUTORY MEETINGS. 

COUNCILLORS. 

Sir Arthur Mitchell, K.C.B. Dr G. Sims Woodhead, F.R.C.P.E. 

Stair Agnew, Esq., OB. Robert Cox, Esq. of Gorgie, M.A. 

Robert M. Ferguson, Esq., Ph.D. Professor Isaac B. Balfour, F.R.S. 

A. Forbes Irvine, Esq. of Drum, LL.D. Professor Ewing, F.R.S. 

Dr J. Batty Tuke, F.R.C.P.E. Professor Jack, LL.D. 

Professor Bower, F.L.S. Professor James Geikie, LL.D., F.R.S. 

The Treasurer's Accounts with the Auditor's Report were presented. On the motion 
of Mr Forbes Irvine, seconded by Dr Buchan, the Auditor was reappointed. 

On the motion of the General Secretary, a vote of thanks was given to the Chairman . 

John Murray, V.-P. 



*/ 



( 1145 ) 



The following Public Institutions and Individuals are entitled to receive Copies of 
the Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh : — 



London, British Museum. 

Royal Society, Burlington House, 
London. 

Anthropological Institute of Great Bri- 
tain and Ireland, 3 Hanover Square, 
London. 

British Association for the Advancement 
of Science, 22 Albemarle Street, 
London. 

Society of Antiquaries, Burlington 
House. 

Royal Astronomical Society, Burlington 
House. 

Royal Asiatic Society, 22 Albemarle 
Street. 

Society of Arts, John Street, Adelphi. 

Athenaeum Club. 

Chemical Society, Burlington House. 

Institution of Civil Engineers, 25 Great 
George Street. 

Royal Geographical Society, Burlington 
Gardens. 

Geological Society, Burlington House. 

Royal Horticultural Society, South Ken- 
sington. 

Hydrographic Office, Admiralty. 

Royal Institution, Albemarle Street, W. 

Linnean Society, Burlington House. 

Royal Society of Literature, 4 St Mar- 
tin's Place. 

Medical and Chirurgical Society, 53 
Berners Street, Oxford Street. 

Royal Microscopical Society, King's 
College. 

Museum of Economic Geology, Jermyn 
Street. 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich. 

Pathological Society, 53 Berners Street. 

Statistical Society, 9 Adelphi Terrace, 
Strand, London. 

Royal College of Surgeons of England, 
40 Lincoln's Inn Fields. 



London, United Service Institution, Whitehall 
Yard. 
University College, Gower Street. 
Zoological Society, 11 Hanover Square. 
... The Editor of Nature, 29 Bedford 

Street, Covent Garden. 
... The Editor of the Electrician, 396 
Strand. 
Cambridge Philosophical Society. 

University Library. 
Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society. 
Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. 
Oxford, Bodleian Library. 
Yorkshire Philosophical Society. 

SCOTLAND. 

Edinburgh, Advocates Library. 
University Library. 
College of Physicians. 
Highland and Agricultural Society, 

3 George IV. Bridge. 
Royal Medical Society, 7 Melbourne 

Place, Edinburgh. 
Royal Observatory. 
Royal Physical Society, 40 Castle 

Street. 
Royal Scottish Society of Arts, 117 

George Street. 
Royal Botanic Garden, Inverleith 
Row. 
Aberdeen, University Library. 
Dundee, University College Library. 
Glasgow, University Library. 

Philosophical Society, 207 Batli Street. 
St Andrews, University Library. 

IRELAND. 

Royal Dublin Society. 

Royal Irish Academy, 19 Dawson Street, 

Dublin. 
Library of Trinity College, Dublin. 



1146 



APPENDIX. 



COLONIES, DEPENDENCIES, &C. 

Bombay, Royal Asiatic Society. 

Elphinstone College. 
Calcutta, Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

Geological Survey of India. 
Madras, Literary Society. 
Canada, Library of Geological Survey. 
Queen's University, Kingston. 
Royal Society of Canada, Parliament 

Buildings, Ottawa, Canada. 
Quebec, Literary and Philosophical 

Society. 
Toronto, Literary and Historical Society. 
The Canadian Institute. 
Cape of Good Hope, The Observatory. 
Melbourne, University Library. 
Sydney, University Library. 

Linnsean Society of New South Wales. 
Royal Society of New South Wales. 
Wellington, New Zealand Institute. 

CONTINENT OP EUROPE. 

Amsterdam, Koninklijke Akademie van Weten- 
schappen. 
Koninklijk Zoologisch Genootschap. 
Athens, University Library. 
Basle, Die Schweizerische Naturforschende Gesell- 

schaft. 
Bergen, Museum. 
Berlin, Konigliche Akademie der Wissenschaften. 

Physicalische Gesellschaft. 
Bern, Allgemeine Schweizerische Gesellschaft fur 

die gesammten Naturwissenschaften. 
Bologna, Accademia delle Scienze dell' Istituto. 
Bordeaux, Society des Sciences Physiques et 

Naturelles. 
Brussels, Academie Royale des Sciences, des 
Lettres et des Beaux-arts. 
Musee Royal d'Histoire Naturelle de 

Belgique. 
L'Observatoire Royal. 
La Societe Scientifique. 
Bucharest, Academia Romana. 
Buda-Pesth, Magyar Tudomdnyos Akademia — Die 
Ungarische Akademie der Wissenschaften. 
... Konigliche Ungarische Naturwissenschaft- 
liche Gesellschaft. 
Catania, Accademia Gioenia di Scienze Naturali. 
( ;iiristiania, University Library. 



Christiania, Meteorological Institute. 

Coimbra, University Library. 

Copenhagen, Royal Academy of Sciences. 

Danzig, Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 

Dorpat, University Library. 

Ekatherinebourg, La Society Ouralienne d'Ama- 

teurs des Sciences Naturelles. 
Erlangen, University Library. 
Frankfurt-am-Main, Senckenbergische Naturfor- 
schende Gesellschaft. 
Gand (Ghent), University Library. 
Geneva, Societe de Physique et d'Histoire Natu- 
relle. 
Genoa, Museo Civico di Storia Naturale. 
Giessen, University Library. 
Gbttingen, Konigliche Gesellschaft der Wissen- 
schaften. 
Graz, Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Steier- 

mark. 
Haarlem, Societe Hollandaise des Sciences Exactes 
et Naturelles. 
Musee Teyler. 
Halle, Kaiserliche Leopoldino - Carolinische 
Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 
Hamburg, Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein, 6 

Domstrasse. 
Helsingfors, Sallskapet pro Fauna et Flora 
Fennica. 
Societas Scientiarum Fennica (Societe 
des Sciences de Finlande). 
Jena, Medicinisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Gesell- 
schaft. 
Kasan, University Library. 
Kiel, University Library. 
... Ministerial-Kommission zur Untersuchung 
der Deutschen Meere. 
Kiev, University of St Vladimir. 
Konigsberg, University Library. 
Leyden, Neerlandsche Dierkundige Vereeniging. 

The University Library. 
Leipzig, Prof. Wiedemann, Konigliche Sachsischc 

Akademie. 
Lille, Societe des Sciences. 
Lisbon, Academia Real das Sciencias de Lisboa. 

Sociedade de Geographia, 5 Rua Capello. 
Louvain, University Library. 
Lucca, M. Michelotti. 
Lund, University Library. 



APPENDIX. 



1147 



Lyons, Academie des Sciences, Belles Lettres et 
Arts. 
... Soci^te' dAgriculture. 
Madrid, Real Academia de Ciencias. 

Comision del Mapa Geologico de Espafia. 
Milan, Eeale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze, Lettere, 

ed Arti. 
Modena, Regia Accademia di Scienze, Lettere, ed 

Arti. 
Montpellier, Academie des Sciences et Lettres. 
Moscow, Societe Imp6riale des Naturalistes de 
Moscou. 
Societe Imperiale des Amis d'Histoire 
Naturelle, dAnthropologie et d'Eth- 
nographie. 
Mus^e Poly technique. 
L'Observatoire Imperial. 
Munich, Kb'niglich-Bayerische Akademie der Wis- 

senschaften (2 copies). 
Naples, Zoological Station, Dr Anton Dohrn. 

Societa Reale di Napoli — Accademia delle 
Scienze Fisiche e Matematiche. 
Neufchatel, Societe des Sciences Naturelles. 
Nice, L'Observatoire. 

Palermo, Signor Agostino Todaro, Giardino 
Botanico. 
Societa di Scienze Naturali ed Econo- 
miche. 
Paris, Academie des Sciences de l'lnstitut. 
. . . Academie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres 
de l'lnstitut. 
Association Scientifique de France. 
... Socie^ d' Agriculture, 18 Rue de Belle- 

chasse. 
... Society Nationale des Antiquaires de 
France. 
Sociele de Biologie. 
... Societe" de Geographie, 184 Boulevard St 

Germain. 
... Societe G^ologique de France, 7 Rue des 
Grands Augustins. 
Soci6te d'Encouragement pour l'lndustrie 

Nationale. 
Bureau des Longitudes. 
. . . Dejpot de la Marine. 
... Societ6 Math6matique, 7 Rue des Grands 

Augustins. 
... Ecole des Mines. 
. . . Ministere de l'Instruction Publique. 
VOL. XXXV. PART IV. 



Paris, Musee Guimet, 3Cf Avenue du Trocadero. 
... Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Jardin des 
Plantes. 
L'Observatoire. 

Ecole Normale Superieure, Rue d'Ulm. 
. . . Societe Frangaise de Physique, 44 Rue de 

Rennes. 
... Ecole Polytechnique. 
... Societe Zoologique de France, 7 Rue des 
Grands Augustins. 
Prague, Konigliche Sternwarte. 

Kb'niglich-Bohmische Gessellschaft der 
Wissenschaften. 
Rome, R. Accademia dei Lincei. 

Accademia Ponteficia dei Lincei. 
Societa Italiana delle Scienze detta dei 
XL. 
. . . Societa degli Spettroscopisti Italiani. 
Comitato Geologico. 
Rotterdam, Bataafsch Genootschap der Proefon- 

dervindelijke Wijsbegeerte. 
St Petersburg, Academie Imperiale des Sciences. 
Commission Imperiale Archeblo- 

gique. 
Comity Geologique. 
L'Observatoire Imperial de Pul- 

kowa. 
Physikalisches Central-Observato- 

rium. 
Physico-Chemical Society of the 
University of St Petersburg. 
Stockholm, Kongliga Svenska Vetenskaps-Acade- 

mien. 
Strasbourg, University Library. 
Stuttgart, Verein fur Vaterlandische Naturkunde 

zu Wiirtemberg. 
Throndbjem, Videnskabernes Selskab. 
Toulouse, Faculte des Sciences. 

L'Observatoire. 
Tubingen, University Library. 
Turin, Reale Accademia delle Scienze. 
Upsala, Kongliga Vetenskaps-Societeten. 
Venice, Reale Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere 

ed Arti. 
Vienna, Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissen- 
schaften. 
Novara Commission. 

Oesterreichische Gesellscbaft fur Mete- 
orologie, Hohe Warte, Wien. 

8 K 



1148 



APPENDIX. 



Vienna, Geologische Reich sanstalt. 

Zoologisch-Botanische Gesellschaft. 
Zurich, University Library. 

Commission G^ologique Suisse. 

ASIA. 

Java, Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en 
Wetenschappen. 
... The Observatory. 
Japan, The Imperial University of Tokio 
(Teikoku-Daigaku ) . 

UNITED STATES OP AMERICA. 

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Street. 
Scottish Meteorological Society, 122 

George Street. 
Pharmaceutical Society, 36 York PI. 
Geological Society of Glasgow, 207 Bath Street. 



The Glasgow University Observatory. 
Berwickshire Naturalists' Club, Old Cambus, 
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ENGLAND. 

London, Geologists' Association, University 

College. 
Mathematical Society, 22 Albemarle 

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Institution of Mechanical Engineers, 

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Westminster. 



APPENDIX. 



1149 



London, Meteorological Office, 1 16 Victoria Street. 
The Meteorological Society, 25 Great 

George Street, Westminster. 
Nautical Almanac Office, 3 Verulam 

Buildings, Gray's Inn. 
Pharmaceutical Society, 17 Bloomsbury 
Square, London. 
Birmingham Philosophical Society, King Edward's 

Grammar School. 
Cornwall, Geological Society. 

Koyal Institution of Cornwall, Truro. 
Epping Forest and County of Essex Naturalists' 

Field Club. 
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Yorkshire. 
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Microscopical Society, care of the 
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and Mechanical Engineers. 
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Museum, Norwich. 
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IRELAND. 

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COLONIES, DEPENDENCIES, ETC. 

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The Observatory. 



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CONTINENT OF EUROPE. 

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... K. Technische Hochschule. 
Bonn, Naturhistorischer Verein der Preussischen 

Rheinlande und Westfalens. 
Bern, Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 
Bordeaux, Societe de la G^ographie Commerciale. 
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Bucharest, Institut Metdorologique de Roumanie. 
Cassel, Verein fiir Naturkunde. 
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relles. 
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Dijon, Acad6mie des Sciences. 
Erlangen, Physico-Medical Society. 
Gratz, Chemisches Institut der K. K. Universitat. 
Halle, Verein fiir Erdkunde. 

. . . Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fiir Sachsen 
und Thiiringen. 
Hamburg, Verein fiir Naturwissenschaftliche 

Unterhaltung, 29 Steindamm, St Georg. 
Helsingfors, Societe de G^ographie Finlandaise. 
Iceland, Islenzka Fornleifafelag,Reikjavik, Iceland. 
Lausanne, Societe Vaudoise des Sciences Natu- 

relles. 
Leipzig, Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 
Lille, Society G6ologique du Nord. 
Luxembourg, Societ6 des Sciences Naturelles. 
Lyons, Societe Botanique. 

Societe Linneenne, Place Sathonay. 
Marseilles, Societe Scientifique Industrielle, 61 

Rue Paradis. 
Milan, Societa Crittogamologica Italiana. 
Modena, Societa dei Naturalisti. 
Nijmegen, Nederlandsche Botanische Vereeniging. 
Oberpfalz und Regensburg, Historischer Verein. 



1150 



APPENDIX. 



Odessa, New Natural History Society. 
Offenbach, Verein fiir Naturkunde. 
Paris, Societe d'Anthropologie (4 Rue Antoine 
Dubois). 
... Societe Philomathique. 
. . . Ecole Libre des Sciences Politiques. 
. . . Bureau des Ponts et Chauss^es. 
. . . Societes des Jeunes Naturalistes et d'Etudes 
Scientifiques, 35 Rue Pierre-Cbarron. 
Pisa, Nuovo Cimento. 
St Petersburg, Imperatorskoe Russkoe Geogra- 

pbicheskoe Obtsh6stvo. 
Stockholm, Svenska Sallskapet for Anthropologi 

och Geografi. 
Tiflis, Physical Observatory. 
Trieste, Societa Adriatica di Scienze Naturali. 

Museo Civico di Storia Naturale. 
Tromso, The Museum. 
Utrecht, Provinciaal Genootschap van Kunsten 

en Wetenschappen. 
Vienna, K. K. Naturhistorisches Hof museum., 

I., Burgring, 7. 
Zurich, Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 

ASIA. 

China, Shanghai, North China Branch of the 

Royal Asiatic Society. 
Japan, Tokio, The Seismological Society. 

Yokohama, Deutsche Gesellschaft fiir 
Natur- und Vb'lkerkunde Ostasiens. 
Java, Koninklijke Natuurkundige Vereeniging, 
Batavia. 

UNITED STATES. 

Annapolis, Maryland, St John's College. 
California, State Mining Bureau, Sacramento. 

The Lick Observatory, Mount Hamil- 
ton, vid San Jos6, San Francisco. 

University of California (Berkeley). 



Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Elisha Mitchell 

Scientific Society. 
Chicago Observatory. 
Cincinnati, Observatory. 

Society of Natural History. 
Ohio Mechanics' Institute. 
Colorado, Scientific Society. 
Connecticut, Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
Davenport, Academy of Natural Sciences. 
Iowa, The State University of Iowa. 
Minnesota, The Geological and Natural History 
Survey of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. 
Nebraska, The University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 
New Orleans, Academy of Sciences. 
New York, The American Museum of Natural 
History. 
The American Geographical and Sta- 
tistical Society, No. 11 West 29th 
Street, New York. 
Philadelphia, Wagner Free Institute of Science. 
Salem, The Essex Institute. 

Peabody Academy of Science. 
Trenton, Natural History Society. 
Washington, Philosophical Society. 

American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, Central Park. 
United States National Museum. 
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SOUTH AMERICA. 

Rio de Janeiro, Museo Nacional. 

Santiago, Deutscher Wissenschaftlicher Verein. 



MEXICO. 



Metorologico- Magnetico 



Mexico, Observatorio 

Central. 
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Tacubaya, Observatorio Astronomico. 



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( 1151 ) 



INDEX TO VOL. XXXV. 



A 

Acid Rocks in British Isles, 143. 

Adiantides, 421. 

Aitken (John). On the Number of Dust Particles 
in the Atmosphere, 1. Introduction to the 
Method of Counting, 2. Description of Appa- 
ratus, 5. Estimated Number of Particles in Air 
from Different Sources, 18. 

Alethopteris, 322, 410. 

Alkali-Metals. The Behaviour of the Hydrates 
and Carbonates of the Alkali-Metals at High 
Temperatures. By Professor W. Dittmab, 
429. 

Annularia, 320. 

Aniholithus, 414. 

Archceopteris, 424. 

Asterocalamites, 420. 

B 

Barium. The Behaviour of the Hydrates and Car- 
bonates of at High Temperatures. By Professor 
W. Dittmab, 429. 

Basic Dykes in British Isles, 29. 

Beddard (Frank E.), M.A. On the Anatomy, His- 
tology, and Affinities of Phreoryctes, 629. 

Benzyl Phosphines and their Derivatives. By Pro- 
fessor E. A. Letts and E. F. Blake. See 
Letts (Professor E. A.). 

Blake (E. F.), and Professor E. A. Letts. On 
Benzyl Phosphines and their Derivatives. See 
Letts (Professor E. A.). 

Bosses and Sheets of Gabbro in British Isles, 122. 

Bothrodendron, 412. 

Brady (George Stewardson), M.D., LL.D., F.E.S. 
On Ostracoda collected by H. B. Brady, LL.D., 
F.E.S., in the South Sea Islands, 489. Podo- 
copa, 490. Myodocopa, 513. Platycopa, 
517. 

Brady (H. B.), LL.D., F.E.S. Ostracoda collected 
by him in the South Sea Islands, 489. 



Cadell (Henry M. ), B. Sc. Experimental Eesearches 
in Mountain Building, 337. A. On the Be- 
haviour of Strata when thrust over an Immov- 
able Surface, 339. B. On the Origin of Thrust 
Planes and " Fan Structure," 348. C. On the 
Eelation between Folding and Eegional Meta- 
morphism, 353. 

Calamariai, 398. 

Catamites, 320, 326, 398, 400. 

Calamitina, 326, 398, 400. 

Calamocladus equisetiformis, 326, 401. 

Cardiocarpus, 330. 

Carpolithus, 330. 

Coal Measures, Flora of. By Eobert Kidston, 
320, 325, 391. 

Cordaites, 324, 330, 414, 426. 

Curve on one of the Coordinate Planes, which forms 
the Outer Limit of the Positions of the Point 
of Contact of an Ellipsoid of Eevolution. By 
Dr G. Plarr, 471. 

Curves. Classification of Central Curves, and of 
Curves whose Equations are Homogeneous. 
See Equations (Homogeneous and Central) of the 
nth Degree. By the Hon. Lord M'Laren, 1043. 

Cyperites, 323, 329. 

D 

Dactylotheca, 409. 

Dittmar (Professor W.). On the Behaviour of the 
Hydrates and Carbonates of the Alkali-Metals 
and of Barium at High Temperatures, and on 
the Properties of Lithia and the Atomic Weight 
of Lithium 429. 

Dugong (Halicore), The Placentation of. By Pro- 
fessor Sir "William Turner, M.B., LL.D., 
D.C.L., 641. 

Dust Particles in the Atmosphere, 1. Method of 
Counting, 2. Estimated Number from Different 
Sources, 18. By John Aitken. 



1152 



INDEX. 



E 

Earth Thermometers at the Royal Observatory, Edin- 
burgh. Eight Years' Observations of. By C. 
Piazzi Smyth, late Astronomer-Eoyal for Scot- 
land, 287. 

Ellipsoid of Revolution. See Plark (Dr G.). 

Equations. On Systems of Solutions of Homo- 
geneous and Central Equations of the rath 
Degree and of two or more Variables ; with a 
Discussion of the Loci of such Equations. By 
the Hon. Lord M'Laren, 1043. 

Eucalamites, 400. 



Fan Structure of Mountains, 348. 

Fishes, Development and Life Histories of. See 
M'Intosh (Professor W. O). 

Flora of the Upper Coal Measures, 320, 397. Flora 
of the Middle Coal Measures, 325, 394. Flora 
of the Lower Coal Measures, 393. By Bobert 
Kidston. 

Fossil Plants. See Kidston (Bobert). 

Fraser (Professor Thomas B.), M.D., F.E.SS. Lond. 
and Edin. Strophanthus hispidus : its Natural 
History, Chemistry, and Pharmacology, 955. 
Historical Introduction, 955. Use in Africa as 
an Arrow-Poison, and Description of Arrows, 
960. Botanical Description, 960. Chemistry } 
993. 

G 

Gases. On the Foundations of the Kinetic Theory 
of Gases. III. By Professor Tait, Sec. E.S.E., 
1029. 

Geikie (Archibald, LL.D.). The History of Vol- 
canic Action during the Tertiary Period in the 
British Isles, 21. The Basic Dykes, 29. The 
Volcanic Plateaux, 74. The Bosses and Sheets 
of Gabbro, 122. The Acid Bocks, 143. 

H 

Halirore Dugong, The Placentation of. By Sir 
William Turner, M.B., LLD., D.C.L., 641. 

Halonia, 412. 

Helme (T. Arthur), M.B., Histological Observations 
on the Muscular Fibre and Connective Tissue 
of the Uterus during Pregnancy and the Puer- 
perium, 359. 

Homogeneous and Central Equations of the nth 
Degree and of two or more Variables; with a 
Discussion of the Loci of such Equations. By 
the Hon. Lord M'Laren, 1043. 



Iron and Nickel, Belations between Magnetism and 
Twist in. By Prof. Cargill G. Knott, 377. 

K 
Kidston (Bobert). On Neuropteris plicata, Stern- 
berg, and Neuropteris rectinerins, Kidston, 313. 
On the Fossil Flora of the Staffordshire Coal 
Fields, 317. Flora of the Upper Coal Mea- 
sures, 320. Flora of the Middle Coal Measures, 
325. 
On the Fossil Plants in the Bavenhead Collection 
in the Free Library and Museum, Liverpool. 
Parts I. and II., 391. 
On some Fossil Plants from Teilia Quarry, 
Gwaenysgor, near Prestatyn, Flintshire, 419. 
Kinetic Theory of Gases. III. By Professor Tait, 

Sec. B.S.E., 1029. 
Knots, Non- Alternate + , of Orders Eight and Nine. 
By Professor Little, Nebraska University, 663. 
Knott (Professor Cargill G.). On some Belations 
between Magnetism and Twist in Iron and 
Nickel. Part I., 377. 



Lepidodendron, 323, 326, 411. 

Lepidophloios, 411, 426. 

Lepidophyllum, 412. 

Lepidostrobus, 323, 327, 411. 

Letts (Professor E. A.), and B. F. Blake. On 
Benzyl Phosphines and their Derivatives, 527. 
Part I.— Benzyl Phosphines, 528. Part II.— 
The Action of Alcohols on a Mixture of Phos- 
phorus and its Iodide, 589. Part III. — The 
Products of the Oxidation of Benzyl Phos- 
phines, 609. 

Lithia, The Properties of. By Professor W. Ditt- 
mar, 429. 

Lithium, The Atomic Weight of. By Professor W. 

DlTTMAR, 429. 

Little (Professor C. N., Nebraska Univ.). Non- 
Alternate ± Knots of Orders Eight and Nine, 
663. 

M 

M'Intosh (Professor W. C), and E. E. Prince, 
B.A. On the Development and Life Histories 
of the Teleostean Food- and other Fishes, 665. 

M'Laren (The Hon. Lord). On Systems of Solu- 
tions of Homogeneous and Central Equations of 
the rath Degree and of two or more Variables ; 
with a Discussion of the Loci of such Equa- 
tions, 1043. 



INDEX. 



1153 



Magnetism and Twist, Their Relations in Iron and 
Nickel. Part I. By Professor Cargill G. 
Knott, 377. 

Manganese-Steel. The Thermal Conductivity and 
Specific Heat of Manganese-Steel. By A. 
Crichton Mitchell, B.Sc, 947. 

Mariopteris, 326, 409. 

Megapfiyton, 410. 

Meteorology, Mean Scottish for the last Thirty- 
Two Years (prior to 1888). By C. Piazzi 
Smyth, late Astronomer-Royal for Scotland, 
185. 

Mitchell (A. Crichton), B.Sc. On the Thermal 
Conductivity and Specific Heat of Manganese- 
Steel, 947. 

Mountain Building, Experimental Researches on, 
By Henry M. Cadell, 337. 

Myodocopa, 513. List of Species, 521. 

N 

Neuropteris plieata and Neuropteris rectinervis. By 

Robert Kidston, 313. 
Neuropteris, 321, 326, 408. 
Nickel, Relations between Magnetism and Twist in, 

377. 

O 

Odontopteris, 321, 409. 

Ostracoda collected by H. B. Brady, LL.D., in the 

South Sea Islands. By George Stewardson 

Brady, M.D., LL.D., 489. 



Pecopteris, 322, 409. 

Phosphines. On Benzyl Phosphines and their De- 
rivatives. By Professor E. A. Letts and R. F. 
Blake, 527. 

Phreoryctes, The Anatomy, Histology, and Affinities 
of. By Frank E Beddard, M.A., 629. 

Pinnularia, 324, 415. 

Plarr (Dr G.). Determination of the Curve, on one 
of the Coordinate Planes, which forms the 
Outer Limit of the Positions of the Point of 
Contact of an Ellipsoid of Revolution, which 
always touches the Three Planes of Reference, 
471. 

Platycopa, 517. List of Species, 521. 

Podocopa, 490. List of Species, 519. 

Pregnancy and Puerperium. See Uterus. 

Prince (E. E.), B.A., and Professor W. C. 
M'Intosh. On the Development and Life 
Histories of the Teleostean Food- and other 
Fishes, 665. 



R 

Ravenhead Collection of Fossil Plants. By Robert 

Kidston, 391. 
Rhacophyllum, 410. 
Rhacopteris, 422, 424. 

S 

Scottish Meteorology for the last Thirty-Two Years 
{prior to 1888.) By C. Piazzi Smyth, late 
Astronomer-Royal for Scotland, 185. 

Sigillaria, 323, 327, 413. 

Smyth (C. Piazzi), late Astronomer-Royal for Scot- 
land. Mean Scottish Meteorology for the last 
Thirty-Two Years (prior to 1888), discussed for 
Annual Cycles, as well as Super- Annual Curves, 
on the Basis of the Observations of the Scottish 
Meteorological Society, as published by the 
Registrar-General of Births, Deaths, &c, in 
Scotland, after being computed for that officer 
at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, 1 85. 

Eight Years' Observations of the New Earth 

Thermometers at the Royal Observatory, Edin- 
burgh, 1879-1888, 287. 

Sphenophyllum, 321, 401. 

Sphenopteris, 403, 424, 426. 

Sphyropteris, 402. 

Steel. See Manganese-Steel. 

Sternbergia approximata, 324, 414. 

Stigmaria, 324, 329, 413, 414. 

Strophanthus hispidus: its Natural History, Chemis- 
try, and Pharmacology. By Professor Thomas 
R. Fraser, M.D., F.R.SS. Lond. and Edin., 
955. 

Stylocalamites, 400. 



Tait (Professor), Sec. R.S.E. On the Foundations 

of the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Part III., 

1029. 
(XV.) Special Assumption as to Molecular Force, 

1031. 
(XVI.) Average Value of Encounter and of Im- 
pact, 1031. 
(XVII.) Effect of Encounter on Free Path, 

1035. 
(XVIII.) Average Duration of Entanglement, and 

consequent Average Kinetic Energy, 1037. 
Appendix : — A. Loss of Energy by Impact, 1038. 

B. Law of Distribution of Speed, 1039. C. 

Viscosity, 1039. D. Thermal Conductivity, 

1040. 
Teilia Quarry Fossil Plants. By Robert Kidston, 

419. 



1154 



INDEX. 



Teleostean Food- and other Fishes, Development 

and Life Histories of. By Professor W. C. 

M'Intosh and E. E. Prince, B.A., 665. 
Tertiary Period in the British Isles, Volcanic Action 

during, By Archibald Geikie, LL.D., 21. 
Tliermometers (New Earth) at the Royal Observatory, 

Edinburgh. Eight Years' Observations. By 

C. Piazzi Smyth, late Astronomer-Royal for 

Scotland, 287. 
Thrust Planes, 348. 
Trigonocarpus, 414. 
Turner (Professor Sir William), M.B., LL.D., 

D.C.L. On the Placentation of Halicore 

Dugong, 641. 
Twist and Magnetism, Their Relations in Iron and 

Nickel. By Professor Cargill G. Knott, 

377. 



U 
Uterus during Pregnancy and the Puerperium. By 
T. Arthur Helme, M.B., 359. 



V 

Variables of the u th Degree. See Equations of the 
n ih Degree and of two or more Variables. By 
the Hon. Lord M'Laren, 1043. 

Volcanic Action during the Tertiary Period in the 
British Isles. By Archibald Geikie, 21. 

Volcanic Plateaux in British Isles, 74. 



W 



Walchia imbricata, 324. 



Zeilleria, 403. 



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